It’s winter time, so warm up with some with these upcoming community events!

Jan. 24, 2015: Body-worn cameras: Will they increase police accountability? 

The Seattle Police Commission will be hosting a panel discussion about the initiation of Seattle Police Department’s body cameras to answer the community’s questions about the new initiative, in light of recent events. Panelists will include: Jay Hollingsworth (John T. Williams Organizing Committee), Marissa Johnson & Dan Bash (Outside Agitators 206), Andrew Myerberg (Assistant City Attorney of Seattle), Jennifer Shaw (ACLU), Detective Ron Smith (Seattle Police Officers’ Guild), and Mike Wagers (Seattle Police Department). The event will be moderated by Fe Lopez. The meeting will be held on Saturday, January 24 from 9:30am to 12:00pm at 7054 32nd Ave South. If you have any questions feel free to contact Tracy Whitlatch at (206) 233-2664 or tracym.whitlatch@seattle.gov.

Jan. 28: Job Search Strategies for People with Disabilities from 12:30-1:20 pm (Room 127)

What kinds of questions can employers ask regarding an applicant’s disability? Should you mention that you have a disability in a cover letter or interview? If so, how do you discuss it? Join the Disability Law Alliance, Diversity Committee, Center for Professionalism and Leadership Development, and Center for Public Service Law for a panel discussion on navigating some legal, professionalism and etiquette issues for people with disabilities seeking employment!

Jan. 27: Homeless youth in Seattle

Presented by: Street Youth Legal Advocates of Washington

SJTThe panel will discuss the challenges of working with homeless youth in the Seattle area. Their experiences include running programs for homeless youth, the mental health aspects of homelessness, and legislative advocacy. They will speak about the legal and non-legal issues facing homeless youth in Seattle, the organizations they work with, and how we as students can help.

Panelists:

  • Ellen Sims, Divine Roots Wellness
  • Hickory Gateless, Center for Children and Youth Justice
  • Katara Jordan, Columbia Legal Services

Jan. 29: Debt and Democracy – How the collection of civil fees and fines contributed to the unrest in Ferguson

This webinar will discuss the levying and collection of unfair fees and fines by municipalities and their courts. According to The New York Times, unjust municipal fee and fine practices were one of the “simmering” issues underlying tensions in Ferguson, Missouri following the killing of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown by a Ferguson police officer. According to The Times, “Young black men in Ferguson and surrounding cities routinely find themselves passed from jail to jail as they are picked up on warrants for unpaid fines.” The webinar will present an overview of the causes, consequences and pervasiveness of the problem, and impact on the community, both in Missouri and around the nation. The webinar will also discuss steps to address the problem, including policy advocacy, legislation and litigation. Register for the webinar here.

Jan 30-31: Arctic Encounter Symposium 

The second annual Arctic Encounter Symposium will challenge participants to tackle the shared interests and concerns of the United States and the global community as we look north to the last emerging frontier – the Arctic. Leading experts, CEOs, and thought leaders from the science, technology, maritime, and energy sectors, will gather to challenge the status quo dialogue, critically address challenges to realizing the Arctic’s full potential and collaborate on solutions. Participants will include key industry leaders, policy makers, and regional stakeholders.

This year’s symposium will focus on the role of the U.S. as an arctic nation and the challenges it will confront in its upcoming chairmanship of the Arctic Council, including: climate change, natural resources, investment opportunities, and international relations. The goal of the 2015 Arctic Encounter is to facilitate a creative environment for the development of a proactive agenda, short and long-term domestic and international priorities, and a strategic execution plan.

The two-day program includes complimentary continental breakfast, coffee, and keynote luncheons on both Friday and Saturday. Participants will enjoy a networking reception and seated dinner at the Museum of History and Industry (MOHAI) at Lake Union on the evening of Friday, January 30. A closing reception will take place at the conclusion of the program on Saturday, January 31.

CLE credit is available to attending attorneys. Please direct questions to mgavin2@uw.edu

The AES Committee is pleased to announce the following committed speakers at this time:

  • Senator Lisa Murkowski, United States Senate – Alaska State Legislature
  • Vice Admiral Charles W. Ray, Pacific Area Commander, U.S. Coast Guard Defense Force West
  • Fran Ulmer, Chair, U.S. Arctic Research Commission
  • Rear Admiral Daniel B. Abel, Commander, 17th Coast Guard District
  • Edward Itta, U.S. Arctic Research Commission, former Mayor of the North Slope Borough of Alaska, former President of the Barrow Whaling Captains Association and the Inuit Circumpolar Council – Alaska
  • Brigadier General Guy Hamel, Royal Canadian Air Force, Deputy Director, Strategy, Policy and Plans, North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) and United States Northern Command (USNORTHCOM)
  • Representative Bob Herron, Co-Chair, Alaska Arctic Policy Commission, Alaska
  • Mikå Mered, Managing Partner, POLARISK Group – London
  • Marilyn Heiman, Director, U.S. Arctic Program, The Pew Charitable Trusts
  • Brendan Kelly, Chief Scientist, Monterey Bay Aquarium, former Assistant Director for Polar Sciences, The White House
  • Rick Fox, President & General Manager, Edison Chouest Offshore
  • Senator Lesil McGuire, Co-Chair, Alaska Arctic Policy Commission, Alaska State Legislature
  • Dr. Lawson Brigham, Distinguished Professor of Geography & Arctic Policy, University of Alaska Fairbanks; and Fellow, U.S. Coast Guard Academy Center for Arctic Studies & Policy
  • Mead Treadwell, Owner, Treadwell Development; Lieutenant Governor of Alaska, 2010-2014; Advisor and Former Chair, U.S. Arctic Research Commission
  • Adrianna Muir, Ph.D., Deputy Senior Arctic Official, U.S. Department of State
  • Alice Rogoff, Publisher, Alaska Dispatch News; Co-Founder, The Arctic Circle
  • Dr. James Kendall, Regional Director, Alaska OCS Region, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management
  • Michael K. Young, President, The University of Washington
  • Kellye Testy, Dean, UW School of Law
  • Craig H. Allen Sr., Judson Falknor Professor of Law; Director, UW Arctic Law & Policy Institute
  • Reggie Joule, Mayor, The Northwest Arctic Borough
  • Rachel Kallander, Founder & Executive Director, Arctic Encounter Symposium; Manager, Kallander & Associates LLC
  • John Iani, Partner, Perkins Coie LLP
  • Chris Gregorich, Chief of Staff, The Office of Mayor Murray, City of Seattle
  • Steve Wackowski, Operations Manager, Tulugaq, LLC
  • Captain John Reeves, USCG Cutter HEALY

Feb. 4: Panel on the Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act

The Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act (PTFA), which offered important protections to tenants in  residential property subject to foreclosure, expired at the end of 2014. Housing advocates are invited to join us for a free webinar to discuss strategies to protect tenants post-PTFA. Five panelists, including Jeremy Bergstrom of the Shriver Center, Kent Qian of the National Housing Law Project, Tristia Bauman of the National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty, Matt Hill of the Public Justice Center, and Linda Couch of the National Low Income Housing Coalition, will discuss the implications of the PTFA’s expiration and state initiatives to pass similar protections.Feb. 4: Panel about the Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act

Department of Justice Seeks Trial Attorney, Applications Due 2/14

Attention Recent Grads!  DOJ’s Office of Internal Affairs Seeks Trial Attorney, Due 2/14

US DOJ logo

The Criminal Division of the U.S. Department of Justice is seeking Attorney(s) for permanent position(s) in the Office of International Affairs. Positions are based in Washington, DC. Upon accepting an offer of employment, applicants must make a three-year commitment to the Office of International Affairs.

The attorney(s) selected will likely be assigned to one of six geographical teams. Responsibilities will include extensive, high-volume casework (international extradition and mutual legal assistance), law enforcement treaty negotiations and implementation consultations, preparation of briefing materials for the Attorney General and Department principals, and other international criminal law matters. These responsibilities require regular contact regarding a wide range of complex law enforcement issues with U.S. federal, state, and local prosecutors and law enforcement personnel, other Department components, the State Department and various other federal agencies, as well as law enforcement counterparts abroad.

For more information and application details, click here.

Center for Reproductive Rights Offers Summer Internships

2014 Summer Internship in Africa Regional Office, Due 2/20

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The Center for Reproductive Rights is a non-profit legal advocacy organization dedicated to advancing reproductive freedom as a fundamental right that all governments are legally obligated to protect, respect, and fulfill.  The Center engages in cutting-edge impact litigation, policy analysis, advocacy, research and public education throughout the world, to achieve women’s equality in society and to ensure that all women have access to appropriate and freely chosen reproductive health services.

We seek to hire one skilled and highly-motivated legal intern to work with the Africa program between 2nd June and 8th August 2014. As an intern based in the Center’s Nairobi Office in Kenya, you will assist members of the regional  legal team in Nairobi and New York with a range of activities.

For a complete description and application details, click here.

2014 Summer Federal Advocacy Intern

CRR Logo

The Center for Reproductive Rights is a non-profit legal advocacy organization dedicated to advancing reproductive freedom as a fundamental right that all governments are legally obligated to protect, respect, and fulfill. The Center’s domestic and international programs engage in litigation, policy analysis and advocacy, legal research, and public education seeking to achieve women’s equality in society and ensure that all women have access to appropriate and freely chosen reproductive health services.

For a complete description and application details, click here.

Congressional Executive Commission on China Seeks Summer Intern for 2014, Due 3/1

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The Congressional-Executive Commission on China (www.cecc.gov) is offering paid internships to qualified undergraduates, graduate students, or recent graduates this coming summer in Washington, D.C. Interns must be U.S. citizens. The application deadline is March 1, 2014 for the Summer 2014 internship that runs from June to August 2014. Summer internships are full-time; interns are expected to work from 32 to 40 hours per week.

For application instructions, click here.

Attention 3Ls and Recent Grads! NALP Street Law Seeking Legal Diversity Pipeline Project Fellow for 2014-2016, Due 3/15

NALP Street Law Logo

This two-year fellowship provides a wonderful opportunity for a public interest-minded law graduate who also has an interest in education and diversity in the legal profession.  The NALP/Street Law Legal Diversity Pipeline Program, a joint initiative undertaken by both organizations in 2008, is designed to provide information about the law and the legal profession to high school students and encourage them to pursue legal careers.  In particular, the program targets students from minority groups that are underrepresented in the practice of law.

For more information and application details, click here.

KCBA Offers Pro Bono Council Internship for Summer 2014, Due 4/4

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The Pro Bono Council (PBC) was formed as a committee of the Washington State Access to Justice Board in January 2014. The PBC works on behalf of pro bono programs throughout Washington State that provide free legal services to low-income individuals through recruiting, training, and retaining volunteer attorneys.  The PBC will support pro bono programs through the development and implementation of both statewide and local projects.  The PBC intern will directly assist in the development and implementation of these projects and have the opportunity to take part in increasing access to effective and efficient pro bono legal services in Washington State.

For more information and application details, please click here.

Awesome Opportunities- Bring it On!

Echoing Green Announces Next Fellowship Application Cycle

echoinggreenHave an entrepreneurial idea for social justice organization ? Interested in some seed money and technical support to launch this organization?

Echoing Green’s Fellowship Programs will offer more than $3.8 million in seed-stage funding and support this year to emerging leaders working to bring about positive social change. From thousands of applicants, only about 1 percent are ultimately awarded a Fellowship. During their first two years, Fellows receive up to $90,000, participate in leadership development gatherings, and have access to the powerful network of Echoing Green Fellows, partners, and friends. We continue to support our Fellow community long after their initial funding period with ongoing programs and opportunities at critical inflection points in their organizations or careers.

We believe investing in and supporting the right people relative to the right ideas and ability to execute, rather than specific business plans, results in a lifetime of leadership. Echoing Green has invested over $33 million in seed-stage funding and strategic assistance in nearly 600 world-class leaders driving positive social change around the globe. Echoing Green Fellows include the founders of Teach For America, City Year, College Summit, Citizen Schools, One Acre Fund, and SKS Microfinance.

ECHOING GREEN MANAGES THREE DISTINCT FELLOWSHIP PROGRAMS

The Global Fellowship is our twenty-five year-old program for smart young leaders who are deeply connected to the needs and potential solutions that may work best for their communities. Any emerging social entrepreneur from any part of the world working to disrupt the status quo may apply.

The Open Society Black Male Achievement (BMA) Fellowship invests in emerging leaders dedicated to improving the life outcomes of black men and boys in the U.S. The BMA Fellowship unlocks access to the vast communities of Echoing Green and Open Society Foundations.

The Climate Fellowship, announced in 2013, is specifically targeted for the best next-generation social entrepreneurs committed to working on innovations in mitigation and adaptation to climate change.

The 2014 Echoing Green Fellowship Application will be open from December 3, 2013 to January 6, 2014.

Lawyers Fostering Independence Program Seeking UW Law Student Summer Interns CCYJ

Center for Children & Youth Justice (CCYJ) is a private non-profit organization dedicated to reforming the state’s juvenile justice and child welfare system.  Lawyers Fostering Independence (LFI) program is an initiative within the CCYJ that connects former foster youth with pro bono legal representation on civil legal issues.  A part-time legal intern/extern is sought.  This person will work closely with the LFI Managing Attorney, conducting client screening, outreach and substantive legal research, and some administrative tasks.  The extern may also have the opportunity to work more hours and gain experience in other practice areas if interested in other projects at CCYJ.

This internship/externship is open to all law students.

Time commitment: Varies between 10-20 hours per week and can be extremely flexible around your schedule, though we ask that you try to work at least 5 hours, two days a week.  We also require a commitment for at least two quarters.
Location: 615 2nd Ave, Ste 275 (Pioneer Square), Seattle, WA

Recommended Skills: Demonstrated interested in child welfare, juvenile justice, or related fields, and/or experience working with youth, at-risk families or underserved communities.

Supervision/Training: Direct supervision by an attorney; training provided as needed.

Application Process: Send resume, transcript (unofficial is ok), and cover letter to the LFI Managing Attorney, Serena E. Holthe at sholthe@ccyj.org.  Writing sample and two professional references may be requested if selected for interview.

Application Deadline:  Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

Contact: Serena E. Holthe – sholthe@ccyj.org – 206-696-7503 x.17

Columbia Legal Services Seeking Bi-Lingual Staff Attorney for Yakima Office

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Columbia Legal Services seeks an experienced bilingual attorney to work on a broad range of systemic legal issues affecting farm and other low-wage workers and their family members in Washington, but particularly in the Central Washington region. The range of potential issues the attorney may work on include employment, health care, housing, food, benefits, and economic justice. Experience working with immigrant and indigenous populations on basic human needs or farm worker employment issues is strongly desired and bilingual skills in Spanish/English is required.

The position is full-time and will be located in Yakima. The position is open until filled. For complete job description and application instructions please click here.

Southern Poverty Law Center Seeks Staff Attorney for Immigrant Justice Project in Atlanta SPLC

The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) seeks an attorney to join its Immigrant Justice Project office in Atlanta, Georgia. The SPLC is dedicated to fighting hate and bigotry, and to seeking justice for the most vulnerable members of our society. Our Immigrant Justice Project works on cases involving the rights of immigrants in nine southern states. Representative cases include large scale litigation on behalf of victims of trafficking, class actions on behalf of guest workers based on violations of their federal employment rights, and civil rights litigation related to anti-immigrant laws, policies, and practices.

Applications accepted on a rolling basis. For complete job description and application instructions please click here.

The Northwest Immigrant Rights Project Seeks Law Student Interns for its Granger, Seattle, Tacoma and Wenatchee Offices

NWIRPThe Northwest Immigrant Rights Project is seeking law student applications for summer internship positions in its Granger, Seattle, Tacoma and Wenatchee offices. These internships are unpaid, but NWIRP will work with applicants to secure outside funding or academic credit.

Interested applicants should apply to each office individually by sending a cover letter and resume to the contact person listed here with “2014 Summer Internship” in the subject line.

For complete job descriptions and application instructions please click here. Full consideration will be given to applications received by December 5, 2013. No applications will be accepted after February 15, 2014.

Former Foster Kids Plead for Attorneys in WA, Haitian Cholera Victims Sue UN and Openly Gay, Secretly Undocumented

Former Foster Children Plead for Kids to Have Attorneys

A bill stuck in the Legislature could make a difference for young people when they are most alone and in need.
foster kids bill
By John Stang- Crosscut.com. Photo courtesy by John Stang
October 4, 2013–The  common thread was control. Losing it.
Yearning for it. Grasping for it.That’s part of being in the foster care system. moving from foster family to foster family, from school to school without any legal say in your fate.Three women, all former foster kids, shared their experiences with the Washington House’s Early Learning & Human Services Committee and Judiciary Committee on Thursday at a hearing in Olympia. They testified in favor of a stalled bill that would require the state to provide foster kids — indeed, all kids — with an attorney in family court cases where the child’s parents have had their parental rights terminated.”I did not know what it would be like to feel alone until I was in foster care (at the age of 5),” Delilah Bruskas, 48, told the committee. Delilah, who is from Tacoma, lived with seven foster families, attending four elementary, two junior high and four high schools. “If I had legal representation,” she continued, “I’d have asked several questions: When can I see my mother? When can I go home? … I feared social workers. To me, they were the most powerful people on earth. They could take a child from a family. … I believe legal representation can ensure optimal outcomes.”“It takes away your humanity,” said Mikhail Stewart, 21, of Olympia, about her journey through 22 different foster homes in six years. “It seems like you’re a piece of property.”Mandy Urwiler, 19, of Seattle said the attorney she obtained in family court four years ago “treated me like an adult when the state treated me like a kid.”Washington’s 39 counties are a hodgepodge of different rules about when to provide attorneys for foster children whose parents had their rights terminated. Right now, the appointment of attorneys in such cases is discretionary — based on a judge’s determination — and it varies widely across the state. King County appoints an attorney for children 12 and older; the Benton-Franklin county system for kids eight and older; judges in several counties don’t appoint attorneys for kids at all.”Youths are constantly baffled by the fact that some kids get an attorney and some do not,” said Jim Theofelis,  executive director of The Mockingbird Society, a foster care advocacy organization. “Surely, we do not want a justice-by-geography system. … An unintended consequence of no legal representation is that it feeds that feeling of desperation in young people.” Continue reading here.Check out the full hearing here

Haitian Cholera Victims Sue UN for Gross Negligence

October 9, 2013, New York— Attorneys from the human rights groups Bureau des Avocats Internationaux(BAI) and Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti (IJDH), and civil rights law firm Kurzban, Kurzban, Weinger, Tetzelli & Pratt (KKWT), announced today the filing of a class action lawsuit against the United Nations (UN) on behalf of victims of the deadly cholera epidemic in Haiti.  Since October 2010, when the UN contaminated Haiti’s principal river with cholera-infected human waste, the disease has killed over 8,300, sickened more than 650,000, and continues to kill about 1,000 Haitians per year.

Speaking from Geneva, where he is being honored as a finalist for the Martin Ennals Human Rights Award, BAI Managing Attorney Mario Joseph said: “The filing of this lawsuit marks a critical step towards justice for Haiti and all those who have suffered and are suffering because of cholera.”  Joseph is co-counsel on the case and has led the fight for justice for cholera victims since 2011.

The plaintiffs in the case are five Haitians and Haitian-Americans whose family members died of the disease or who were infected but managed to survive life-threatening cholera. The plaintiffs are asking the court to certify the case as a class action, which will allow the plaintiffs to represent and obtain relief for the hundreds of thousands Haitians and Haitian-Americans who suffered injuries or died from cholera.

“The Plaintiffs have undergone indescribable suffering as a result of cholera and have to live with the knowledge that cholera can strike again. They have rights to have a Court hear their case and rights to damages that will help them go on with their lives and access clean water,” said Brian Concannon, Jr., Esq., director of IJDH and co-counsel for the plaintiffs.

The 67-page complaint, filed today in federal court in the Southern District of New York, details extensive evidence demonstrating that the UN knew or should have known that its reckless sanitation and waste disposal practices posed a high risk of harm to the population, and that it consciously disregarded that risk, triggering an explosive epidemic. The plaintiffs seek damages for personal injury, wrongful death, emotional distress, loss of use of property and natural resources, and breach of contract.

“We anticipate that the UN will seek to avoid responding to the evidence presented by the victims by arguing that the court does not have jurisdiction to hear the case. We are prepared for that challenge, and are confident that the court will find that the case must proceed because the victims have a recognized right to access courts that must be protected,” said Ira Kurzban, Esq., a civil rights litigator with KKWT and co-counsel on the case.

The UN has legal obligations under international treaties to provide people harmed by its operations either compensation or a fair forum to present their claims, but the organization has not complied with this requirement. In November 2011, BAI, IJDH and KKWT filed claims with the UN on behalf of 5,000 Haitian victims of cholera, seeking remedies and the establishment of the commission.

The UN refused to receive the claims in February 2013, claiming that they were “not receivable” because considering them would “require a review of political or policy matters.” The UN has come under strong criticism for its handling of the case, which includes denial of responsibility, stonewalling press inquiries, and a refusal to even meet with the cholera victims or their lawyers.

Openly Gay, Secretly Undocumented

NewAmericanMedia

New America Media / Coachella Uninc., News Feature, Brenda R. Rincon, Posted: Oct 02, 2013. Photo courtesy, New America Media

PALM SPRINGS, Calif. – Juan Ceballos came to the United States so he could live freely as an openly gay man. But the move came with a high cost: he had to take on another secret identity as an undocumented immigrant.

Ceballos was 17 when he entered the United States by foot, a backpack on his shoulders, easily passing as an American student through the Tijuana border.

He quickly realized that, as an undocumented immigrant, it wouldn’t be easy to stay in the United States. And as a gay man, it wouldn’t be easy to go back to Mexico.

Ultimately, his fear of being deported outweighed his fear of being ostracized in Mexico.

“To be here was more difficult,” says Ceballos. “I was afraid.”

After only two months of living as an undocumented immigrant in the United States, Ceballos decided to go back to Mexico.

But he didn’t last long there either.

His return to his hometown of San Luis Potosí, in central Mexico, thrust him back into the same bullying and verbal abuse that he had tried to escape.

Ceballos, who knew he was gay at a very young age, had a difficult relationship with his father, who he describes as “macho.” The treatment he received from his father upon his return home eventually drew him back to the United States.

Continue reading here.

Human Rights Webinar, NARPA Conference & Support OneAmerica and Real Change

September 17- OneAmerica Open House

OneAmericaThe Board and staff of OneAmerica are pleased to invite you to join us for complimentary beverages and hors d’oeuvres in OneAmerica’s office in Seattle’s International District for an Open House and special update on its work in the immigrant community this fall and beyond.

As we organize, advocate and build power in immigrant communities statewide, we want you and our other valued supporters to have an opportunity to hear about our achievements, plans and strategy.

We will also be featuring our Youth Program, which is a winner of the 2013 Colleen Willoughby Youth Civic Education Award from CityClub Seattle and has recently been highlighted in the Seattle Globalist.

When? Tuesday, September 17, 2013, 4:30 – 6:30 p.m.

Where? OneAmerica 1225 S. Weller Street, Suite 430 Seattle, WA 98144

To RSVP, please email becky@weareoneamerica.org or call 206-452-8411.

September 24- Come to the 19th Annual Real Change Breakfast

real change breakfast

Registration: 7:30 AM – 8:00 AM
Breakfast: 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM

Washington State Convention Center

Speakers: This year’s Breakfast will feature Senator Ed Murray and Mayor Mike McGinn, being interviewed by Q13 Political Analyst C.R. Douglas, as they stake out their positions on homelessness and housing affordability to help us decide who should be the next Mayor of Seattle. This should be an exciting and informative discussion, and we hope you’ll join us for it.
Join the Party!
• Interested in becoming a Sponsor?  Check out our Sponsor Packet for more information.
• Want to invite your friends and family?  Learn more about becoming a Table Captain andclick here to register.
• Just want to come and find out what we’re all about?  Click here to register as an individual.
Please register by Monday, 9/16/13.
If you have questions about this event or would like to be a Sponsor, Table Captain, or Volunteer, please call 206.441-3247 ext. 221 or email breakfast@realchangenews.org

September 25-Human Rights Webinar: Focus on International Child Abduction

universal-declaration-of-human-rightsWednesday, September 25,  3:30 PM – 4:30 PM PST

The Local Human Rights Lawyering Project holds regular webinars to introduce legal aid attorneys to the Human Rights in the U.S. Handbook for Legal Aid Attorneys. This webinar will focus on a new section of the Handbook on International Child Abduction and the Hague Convention. Pamela Brown, Director of the Bi-National Family Violence Project of Texas RioGrande Legal Aid, Inc., will lead the webinar and discuss how to formulate human rights arguments for U.S. courts and policymakers in international child abduction cases.

The online training is free and registration is open. Register here.

September 26-28- National Association for Rights Protection and Advocacy Annual Rights Conference

NARPA logoThe National Association for Rights Protection and Advocacy’s (NARPA) mission is to promote policies and pursue strategies that result in individuals with psychiatric diagnoses making their own choices regarding treatment. We educate and mentor those individuals to enable them to exercise their legal and human rights with a goal of abolition of all forced treatment.

For 31 years, NARPA has provided an educational conference with inspiring keynoters and outstanding workshops. We learn from each other and come together as a community committed to social justice for people with psychiatric labels.

The Hilton Hartford                          Register Here:   (PDF)   (DOC)
315 Trumbull Street
Hartford, Connecticut                      Full Schedule 

 
Select List of Confirmed Presentations:

Exciting Internships & Externships Revealed

Attention Rising 2Ls! Native American Rights Fund Accepting Applications for Paid Summer 2014 Clerkships/Internships

narf_logoFounded in 1970, the Native American Rights Fund (NARF) is the oldest and largest nonprofit law firm dedicated to asserting and defending the rights of Indian tribes, organizations and individuals nationwide. NARF’s practice is concentrated in five key areas: the preservation of tribal existence; the protection of tribal natural resources; the promotion of Native American human rights; the accountability of governments to Native Americans; and the development of Indian law and educating the public about Indian rights, laws, and issues. 

NARF is currently seeking candidates for its Summer 2014 Clerkships. Each year, NARF conducts a nation-wide search for law students to participate in its Law Clerk Program. Positions are available in all three of NARF’s offices: Anchorage, AK; Boulder, CO; and Washington, D.C. Coursework in Native American Law required. Applicants must have completed their 2L year by Summer 2014. Clerks are paid $20/hour.

Requested Documents: Resume, Cover Letter, Unofficial Transcript, Writing Sample. Please include one letter of recommendation and references. To apply, please send your complete application packet to: Chrissy Johnson Dieck, Law Clerk Program Coordinator, Native American Rights Fund, 1506 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80302.

Please direct all questions to Chrissy Johnson Dieck at cjohnson@narf.org. Applications Accepted Until: November 1.

WA Attorney General’s Office’s Social & Health Services Division Seeking Fall Externs

WA AGO sealThe Washington State Attorney General’s Office’s Tacoma Division has an excellent and challenging opportunity for a qualified law student to earn academic credit by serving in its Social and Health Services Section during an upcoming semester or quarter. A large percentage of the work of the Tacoma Division involves juvenile litigation, which is done on behalf of the Children’s Services Administration of the Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS). The Tacoma Division attorneys also handle licensing actions relating to foster homes, as well as guardianships and adult family home and boarding home licensing actions for the Aging and Disability Services Administration of DSHS. The selected candidate would work as a part of a team of attorneys, paralegals, and other experts within the Division in investigating, filing and litigating cases during an upcoming academic quarter/semester.

Qualified applicants are individuals who excel academically as demonstrated by law school grades and class standing, and who demonstrate a high degree of competence based on prior experiences. The AGO seeks applicants who are committed to public service as demonstrated by an applicant’s background, talents, attitude, and enthusiasm for public law practice. We also seek applicants with a diverse background in education, previous work experience, law school activities, extracurricular activities, community service and areas of interest that enhance our office. Eligibility for WSBA Rule 9 status at the time of the service is strongly preferred.

In order to be considered for this externship position, candidates must submit a cover letter, AGO application form, esume, transcript and one letter of recommendation to Linda Nakamura at 800 Fifth Avenue, Suite 2000, Seattle, WA 98104. Please email your application materials to linda.nakamura@atg.wa.gov.

For information about this opportunity, please contact Section Chief and Senior Counsel Julian Bray at 253.597.4106 and JulianB@atg.wa.gov.

Applications Accepted Until: August 31.

National Housing Law Project Seeks Fall Interns

 NHLP

The National Housing Law Project seeks students for fall 2013 internships. Recent significant student work projects have included writing amicus curiae briefs; drafting testimony for Congressional hearings; submitting comments on proposed regulations; researching the impact of proposed housing legislation and regulations; drafting amendments to federal housing legislation; summarizing briefs in preparation for oral arguments; providing research assistance in drafting pleadings and motions; drafting portions of advocacy guides used by housing advocates across the country; and researching and writing articles for NHLP’s monthly Housing Law Bulletin.

Qualifications: Ideal candidates must possess high-caliber research and writing skills; demonstrate a commitment to working with low-income and underserved populations; and demonstrate an ability to work independently as well as a member of a team. Students will have an opportunity to develop a writing sample as part of their work. NHLP has sponsored several of its former interns for post-graduate fellowships, including Skadden and Equal Justice Works.

Salary: NHLP is happy to work with students who will be receiving credit, work study, or a stipend from their schools for their internship.

Application Instructions: To apply, please e-mail or mail a cover letter, resume, writing sample, and 3 references to: Deborah Thrope, Staff Attorney, National Housing Law Project, 703 Market Street, Suite 2000, San Francisco, CA 94103. dthrope@nhlp.org 415-546-7000 x. 3124

Applications accepted on a rolling basis through September 13.

HealthHIV in DC Announces Health Policy (Legal) Paid Internship for Fall, Spring & Summer

HealthHIVHealthHIV, a national, minority-based nonprofit advancing effective prevention, care and treatment for people at risk for, or living with, HIV or hepatitis, seeks law students for an internship in health policy.

Description HealthHIV’s health policy legal interns are highly motivated second and third-year law students who are interested in health equity and health policy as related to HIV and hepatitis prevention, care, and treatment.   Applicant should be enrolled in an ABA-accredited law school, and available to commit to at least 10 hours a week.

Key Functions Working with the Director of Prevention and Policy, the Health Policy Law Clerk will: • Contribute to analysis of health care policy that impacts HIV and hepatitis prevention, care, treatment, and health equity. • Research areas of health law, and write policy guidance on a wide range of health issues. • Monitor implementation of the Affordable Care Act, including the establishment of State Insurance Exchanges, expansion of Medicaid, development of essential health benefits, and impact of cost containment measures on people at risk for, or living with,   HIV or hepatitis.  • Develop best practice health policy papers for local advocates on topics impacting state health departments, community health centers, community-based organizations, and consumers. • Monitor federal and/or state legislation and regulations.  • Coordinate advocacy meetings and policy briefings with federal, state, and local legislators.

Necessary Skills and Abilities The successful applicant will: • Possess strong project management skills, • Balance multiple responsibilities, • Deliver quality customer service and work products, • Work effectively as part of a team with a diverse staff, • Possess a knowledge of HIV or hepatitis prevention, care, and treatment and/or health equity, and • Possess excellent oral and written communication skills.

To Apply  Submit curriculum vita/resume, brief cover letter defining your areas of interest, and a writing sample of a policy brief to jobs@healthhiv.org.

Coalition of Irish Immigration Centers Seeking National Coordinator for US

CIICThe Coalition of Irish Immigration Centers (CIIC) is a national umbrella group for all of the Irish Immigration Centers in the US, established in 1996 to promote the welfare of Irish immigrants in the US at a national level.

CIIC is seeking a Coordinator to administer the daily operations of the Coalition consistent with its mission and values.

The Coordinator’s primary responsibilities are to act as the main contact for the Coalition, promote the sharing of information and best practices among member centers, advance community outreach, coordinate annual and member meetings, and assist with strategic planning and fundraising as directed by the regionally diverse Board of Directors.

This administrative position is considered part-time at 20 hours per week with some flexibility required based on work volume and coordination of events, board meetings and trainings. Position location flexible within the US. Some travel within the US may be required.

Remuneration will be competitive relevant to the successful candidate’s experience and in keeping with current non-profit standards. A full job description can be obtained by emailing info@ciic-usa.org

Interested applicants are invited to submit a cover letter and resume to info@ciic-usa.org by close of business on Friday, August 23. Due to the anticipated high volume of applicants only qualified candidates will be contacted for interview.

Gender Odyssey Conference, Washington Attorney General Open House & 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington

WA AGO open house.

MLK 50

gender odyssey

Gender Odyssey is an international conference focused on the needs and interests of transgender and gender-nonconforming people. Packed with thought-provoking workshops, discussion groups, social events and entertainment, this one-of-a-kind annual gathering attracts people from all over the world for an uplifting weekend of skill sharing and community in Seattle, USA. Learn more about Gender Odyssey »

Happening Now! Gender Odyssey Conference 2013: August 1st – 4th

Last year’s 11th year anniversary conference was the most well-attended ever with over 25% increased attendance. Don’t miss out on our 2013 gathering!