Attentions Law Students! Limited Funding Available for Equal Justice Works Career Fair! Apply Now!

Equal Justice Works Career Fair Limited Funding Support for UW Law Students

EJW Logo

As noted in the CommonGoodUW.org blog, UW Law students can request up to $450 in reimbursement for the cost of attending the Equal Justice Works Conference and Career Fair October 23-24, 2015 in Arlington, VA.  Priority in selection will be given to students who have secured interviews and to 3Ls.

Application Procedure & Deadlines for UW Law:

To apply for funding please email Dean Storms at mestorms@uw.edu and provide a resume and a brief written statement describing why EJW career fair attendance will be useful for you. If you have applied for or secured an interview during the career fair please include this information.

Monday, October 5, 5:00 p.m.: deadline to apply for travel funding

Friday, October 9, noon: students to be notified of funding awards

Please note: the stipend will reimburse up to $450 of documented travel expenses.  Receipts are strictly required.

The Return of the Debtor’s Prison

Empty Pockets

By Anthony D. Romero | Huffington Post | Photo Credit to Huffington Post

The debtors’ prison was supposed to be a thing of the past–a relic of the colonial era that was outlawed by the United States government nearly two centuries ago. More recently, the Supreme Court ruled that jailing people who lack the means to pay criminal justice fines or fees–a modern-day form of debtors’ prison–is unconstitutional. Ultimately, debtors’ prisons are not only illegal, they are counterproductive: incarceration strains limited public resources and can have devastating consequences on the lives of the poor.

Nonetheless, in the wake of the recent economic recession, cash-strapped state and local governments have aggressively targeted poor individuals who have already served their criminal sentences. The March 2015 U.S. Justice Department’s report on Ferguson, Missouri, provides a horrifying glimpse of what can happen when governments treat the poor as mere revenue sources.

Continue reading here.

Establishing the White House Legal Aid Interagency Roundtable

UN Peace Justice and Strong Institutions

By Director Lisa Foster of the Office for Access to Justice

“Providing meaningful access to justice is a national responsibility and a moral charge.  I am delighted by President Obama’s action to expand legal aid resources for Americans in need, and excited for all that the White House Legal Aid Interagency Roundtable will achieve as it works to advance opportunity, promote equality, and ensure justice for all.” – Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch

What do 20 federal agencies, the United Nations, and civil legal aid have in common?  Plenty, according to President Obama who recently issued a presidential memorandum formally establishing the White House Legal Aid Interagency Roundtable (LAIR).  The presidential memorandum was announced by Roy Austin Jr., Deputy Assistant to the President for Urban Affairs, Justice and Opportunity as well as Ambassador Samantha Power, U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations at an event held on the eve of the UN’s Sustainable Development Summit in New York.  The event highlighted the inclusion of Goal 16 in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.  Goal 16 calls for the promotion of peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, for access to justice for all and for the building of effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels.  With Goal 16, the international community has recognized that access to justice is essential to sustainable development and necessary to end poverty.

Continue reading here.

Pro Bono Gives Solos Experience and Satisfaction

Jill Metz

By Kevin Davis | ABA Journal | Photo of Jill Metz; Photo by Wayne Slezak

When Chicago attorney Jill Metz started practicing as a solo attorney in the early 1980s, she decided she would always make time to do pro bono work.

Though she needed to get her practice off the ground and earn a living, Metz volunteered five to 10 hours a week for the People’s Law Office in the Uptown neighborhood, doing criminal defense work and housing law for the mostly poor clientele.

Recent news stories have exposed that major law firms donate only 0.1 percent of their proceeds to legal aid for low-income people, making the contributions by lawyers like Metz even more crucial for impoverished clients.

Continue reading here.

Attention Spanish-Speaking 2Ls and 3Ls!  International Human Rights Pro Bono Opportunity! EarthRights International Seeks 2L or 3L for Remote Litigation Support

ERI Logo

EarthRights International seeks a 2L or 3L for remote litigation support.  The time commitment is 9-10 hours per week.  No prerequisites, but experience with U.S. litigation is a plus.  The position requires proficiency in Spanish.  The volunteer will work closely with one of the attorney’s at EarthRights International with regular weekly check ins.

The volunteer will be conducting factual and U.S. legal research to assist ERI in developing a transnational injunctive strategy against a mega development project in the Amazon that poses a high risk of environmental and human rights abuses.

To apply, send a cover letter, resume and writing sample to Maryum Jordan, maryum@earthrights.org.  The application deadline is rolling until the position is filled.

Want Direct Client Experience and Make a Difference? Applications Now Being Accepted for Bridging the Gap/Moderate Means Program- Due 10/19

Bridging the Gap Logo

Bridging the Gap provides legal referrals for low and moderate income individuals as a part of the WSBA Moderate Means Program.

Bridging the Gap is a UW Law in-house pro bono program. The goal of the program is to increase access to civil legal services for people of moderate means who cannot afford an attorney but make too much money to qualify for traditional free legal aid services. The program is focused in the areas of Family, Housing and Consumer law.

Law students serving as Bridging the Gap volunteer interns interview potential clients by telephone to collect information and evaluate their cases. Qualifying cases will be referred by interns to participating attorneys who have agreed to represent clients for a reduced fee. After completing training, Bridging the Gap interns will be expected to commit to a minimum of five hours a week for the duration of fall and winter quarters (one hour is a weekly staff meeting).

Benefits to students:

  • Hands-on experience interviewing clients;
  • Training in substantive legal issues, issue-spotting, interviewing skills and ethics;
  • Instruction on how to use the Legal Server database, which is used by most of the civil legal aid organizations in Washington State, and many other states;
  • Supervision and mentoring by experienced attorneys;
  • The satisfaction of helping low and moderate income individuals who otherwise might not receive any legal help at all;
  • Time spent volunteering for Bridging the Gap counts for recognition with the Pro Bono Honors Society.

Upper level students (2L, 3L and LLM) may participate in training for the program now (fall quarter) and begin interviewing clients in November. 1Ls can train now and begin interviewing clients in January.

To apply for the program, submit a letter of interest and resume to Ann Spangler at spangler@uw.edu by October 19, 2015.

Wayfind Microenterprise Clinic and Nonprofit Law Clinic – UW Law Student Volunteers Needed- Application Due 10/20

wayfind logo

Assist pro bono transactional lawyers at either microenterprise clinics or nonprofit legal clinics by taking client interview notes and drafting the client “work plan” which summarizes the legal advice given by the attorney. 

Wayfind provides free business legal services for nonprofit organizations and low-income microentrepreneurs.  Wayfind pro bono attorneys assist non-profit organizations with a range of legal matters including real estate, tax, non-profit governance, and intellectual property.  Wayfind pro bono attorneys also help low-income microentrepreneurs at legal clinics on legal matters including review of contracts, operating agreements and leases, business entity selection, intellectual property matters including publishing and trade name, and adding people to a partnership.

Wayfind hosts different types of legal clinics for its two client populations: non-profit organizations and microentrepreneurs.

For more information, click here.

Attention Spanish Speakers Interested in Family Law & Equal Justice! Pro Bono Opportunity with the King County Bar Association Family Law Program

KCBA Logo

The Family Law Programs of the King County Bar Association’s Pro Bono Services promote family safety and equal access to the legal system by assisting domestic violence survivors, children at risk of abuse or neglect, and clients facing barriers to accessing the courts due to language, disability, and other factors. The Kinship Care Solutions program provides pro bono representation in nonparental custody actions, and the Self-Help Plus program provides pro se assistance in uncontested dissolutions and parenting plan actions. The programs have expanded to help unaccompanied children from Central America who have been abused, neglected or abandoned by a parent and who may be eligible for protective immigration relief called Special Immigrant Juvenile Status (SIJS). Volunteer attorneys assist caregivers and family law members with family law actions in order to obtain court findings that may be used in the SIJS process.

This position will provide experience in practical legal skills such as client interviewing, legal issue spotting, case development, and working with immigrant clients. In addition, the intern will learn substantive and procedural aspects to family law practice and exposure to immigration law. This position is unpaid but can be sponsored for academic credit if available through the student’s school.

For more information, click here.

Attention 1Ls and 2Ls! International Human Rights Pro Bono Opportunity!

Liberty scales

An international corporate accountability and human rights NGO seeks a first- or second-year law student for a short-term unpaid legal internship to begin immediately.  Working closely with the NGO’s attorneys, the intern will conduct legal research and analysis to support litigation in U.S. federal court regarding environmental and human rights violations committed abroad.  The work will be completed remotely and on the intern’s own schedule as long as agreed-upon deadlines are met.  We estimate an initial commitment of 10-20 hours of work in the next month, with the possibility of additional assignments depending on how the matter proceeds.  Please submit a writing sample and a CV to Chris Benoit at chris@coylefirm.com. Applications accepted on a rolling basis.

Attention 3Ls, Recent Grads and Project Based Fellowship Applicants!

UW Law

Did you just submit an EJW or other project based fellowship application? Here’s another opportunity to get your innovative project up and running. Apply for the Berkeley Law Foundation Fellowship! Application due January 15. UW Law students have been past recipients!

For complete info, click here.

Want To Share About Your Summer Experience? Submit Photos to the Summer Experience Photo Contest!

UW Career Center Invites You to Participate in Its Student Photo Contest

UW Summer Experience Photo Contest

We are excited to announce our first-ever student photo contest!  We are encouraging any UW student to take a picture of their “Summer Experience,” which can pertain to their internship, part-time job, travel, volunteer, job shadow, etc.  Students will then post their pictures via their personal Twitter or Instagram accounts, write a short caption describing the context of the picture, and include the hashtag #UWCCPhoto.   The contest runs from August 22nd-September 24th.  Prizes will be awarded!

For full details of the contest and how students submit photos, click here.  We are also tracking photo submissions here.   

2014 King County Support for Solo and Small Firm Attorneys Grants Sponsored by Washington Women Lawyers, King County Chapter

WWL

The King County Chapter of Washington Women Lawyers (KCWWL) is pleased to provide a grant opportunity of up to $1,500 each to two or more awardees to complement our traditional academic scholarships for University of Washington and Seattle University Law School students in 2014.  The Support for Solo and Small Firm Attorneys program is intended to recognize excellence in practice for new solo or small firm (2-3 attorneys) practitioners whose work benefits women directly or improves women’s access to justice in Seattle/King County.

KCWWL has recognized many factors impacting new attorneys as they attempt to enter the work force in the Seattle/King County area, and is continuing its efforts at retaining diversity in the field of law.  This grant is focused on: 1) reducing the numbers of women attorneys leaving the profession; and 2) lessening the impact of the recession on recent bar certified attorneys graduating with record levels of law school debt.

For more information, click here.

New Disability Rights Guide Released by the Washington Leadership Institute on Washington Law Help

Washington Leadership Institute Logo

Knowing your rights as a person with a disability is an important part of being an effective self-advocate and making decisions about your own life. This guide is designed to provide young people with disabilities information and resources so that you can understand and exercise your legal rights.

Check out the new guide online here.

The New Voting Rights Act & Ethical and Risk Management Solutions for the New Solo Practitioner

November 26: Social Justice Tuesday- “History did not end in 1965”: Shelby County and the Voting Rights Act

sjtlogoTuesday, November 26, 12:30-1:20 pm, Room 133

In June 1963, the situation in Birmingham, Alabama had gotten so bad – the violence against and suppression of civil rights activists so abhorrent – that President John F. Kennedy announced on national TV that the events had “so increased the cries for equality that no city or state or legislative body can prudently choose to ignore them.”

In June 2013, another Alabama jurisdiction prevailed before the United States Supreme Court in its challenge to the Voting Rights Act of 1965, perhaps the most important and sweeping civil rights legislation in the country’s history – and a direct legislative response to that violence from fifty years before.  In explaining his ruling, Chief Justice Roberts announced that “history did not end in 1965” and, moreover, that “things have changed dramatically.”  In dissent, Justice Ginsburg argued not only that the “scourge of discrimination” still exists, but also that invalidating the Voting Rights Act was as fundamentally wrongheaded as “throwing away your umbrella in a rainstorm because you are not getting wet.”

In this discussion, we will address the Voting Rights Act, the Court’s decision in Shelby County, the effects of the Court’s ruling, and what interested observers might do in response.

Professor Lisa Manheim will give a short lecture on the implications of that decision for the future of elections in this country with respect to race and socioeconomic class.

If you would like lunch please RSVP via Symplicity or gatespsl@uw.edu by Monday, November 25.

November 28: Happy Thanksgiving UW Law Community!

TG2

December 5: Ethical and Risk Management Solutions for the New Solo Practitioner

Pete RobertsThursday, December 5, 12-5pm, UW Law Gates Hall, Room 119

Thinking about starting your own private practice firm to do plaintiff-side public interest work? Don’t  miss this must attend CLE!Ethical & risk mgt