UW to host Civil Rights attorney Jason Downs, lawyer on Freddie Gray and Flint, Mich. cases

Nov. 1 SJT: Public Defense’s Role in Advancing Social Justice

SJTTime: 12:30 to 1:20 p.m.

Date: Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016.

Place: UW School of Law, Room 127.

This event will provide an introduction to the defenders; Seattle’s front-line soldiers in the battle for criminal justice reform. Besides providing legal representation to indigent clients in several practice areas, the King County Department of Public Defense also works to address racial disproportionality in the criminal justice system, the collateral consequences of justice involvement, and other structural issues that undermine the rights of the criminally accused. DPD representatives will speak to their own experience in criminal law, as well as their role in justice reform movements currently underway here in King County.

Panelists include: La Mer Kyle-Griffiths is the Training Director for the King County Department of Public Defense in Seattle, WA. Before that, she practiced for over 15 years as a public defender in both Kentucky and Massachusetts. She has tried juvenile, adult and a death penalty case as well as arguing two cases to the Kentucky Supreme court; Amy Parker has been serving as a public defense attorney in King County for more than a decade, and recently served as the interim supervisor for the Associated Counsel for the Accused at Seattle Municipal Court. She is a leader in the public defense community and a respected litigator who has brought multiple felony cases to trial; Sade Smith grew up in Pullman, Washington and graduated from the University of Illinois College of Law in 2011. Sade entered public defense shortly after graduation as a public defender in Burlington and Mount Vernon. Since 2014 she has been on case load with the Northwest Defenders Division of the King County Department of Public Defense.

Nov. 1: Panel on I-732: WA Carbon Tax Proposal

elslogoTime: 12:30 to 1:20 p.m.

Date: Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016.

Place: UW School of Law, Room 117.

Please join the Environmental Law Society for a 4-person panel to discuss the proposed Carbon Tax initiative, I-732, on the ballots for this election. Dr. Todd Wildermuth will be moderating the panel, which will include two panelists discussing support for the initiative and two panelists discussing opposition against the initiative. Panelists in support of I-732 will include representatives from Carbon WA and Audobon. Panelists in opposition to I-732 will include representatives from the Washington State Labor Council and One America.

Please join the Environmental Law Society for this great panel to learn more about the controversial Carbon Tax proposal in Washington and gain more insight to make an informed vote this voting season. Food will be provided and a 15-minute open Q&A session will allow for interested parties to ask questions from the panelists.

Nov. 1: Rape on the Night Shift Film Showing

PILA LogoTime: 6 to 9 p.m.

Date: Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016.

Place: UW School of Law, Room 127

The Public Interest Law Association (PILA) is hosting a showing of Rape on the Night Shift, a news investigation into the sexual abuse of immigrant women in the janitorial industry. Please join us for the film showing and a panel discussion that will follow the film. The panel will feature speakers from API Chaya, UNITE HERE! Local 8, and U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Food will be provided.

Nov. 4: Sexual Assault Trauma-Informed Victim Empowerment (STRIVE): Sexual Assault Protection Orders and Victim Rights

logo_ywcaTime: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Date: Friday, Nov. 4, 2016.

Place: Davis Wright Tremaine LLP, 1201 Third Ave., Suite 2200, Seattle, WA 98101

This CLE by the Sexual Violence Legal Services – YWCA will introduce participants to the unique legal needs of sexual assault survivors when seeking a civil protection order or protecting their privacy rights in criminal cases.  The program will provide an in-depth and interactive examination of Washington laws and statutes protecting survivors of sexual violence, along with ethical considerations when representing them.  Participants may earn up to an additional 24 CLE credits representing an SVLS-referred pro bono client.  Agenda and registration at here.

Nov. 7: Special Lunch with Civil Rights Attorney Jason Downs

UW Law LogoTime: 12:30 to 1:20 p.m.

Date: Monday, Nov. 7, 2016.

Place: UW School of Law, Room 115.

Join for an informal gathering preceding Mr. Downs’ evening presentation. Jason Downs is a trial attorney and partner at the Baltimore firm of Murphy, Falcon & Murphy. Mr. Downs focuses his practice on complex cases involving fraud, conspiracy, and police brutality. He was also a part of the litigation team that investigated and settled the Freddie Gray civil matter for $6.4 million. He is currently part of the litigation team handling a class action in the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals based on the Flint, Michigan water crisis. Also, he currently represents the family of Terrence Sterling in the police-involved shooting in Washington, DC. Read the flyer here.

Nov. 7: Racial Justice in Modern America: From Baltimore to Flint & Beyond

screenshot-2Time: 4 to 5 p.m.

Date: Monday, Nov. 7, 2016.

Place: UW School of Law, Room 133

Jason Downs is a trial attorney and partner at the Baltimore firm of Murphy, Falcon & Murphy. Mr. Downs focuses his practice on complex cases involving fraud, conspiracy, and police brutality. He was also a part of the litigation team that investigated and settled the Freddie Gray civil matter for $6.4 million. He is currently part of the litigation team handling a class action in the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals based on the Flint, Michigan water crisis. Also, he currently represents the family of Terrence Sterling in the police-involved shooting in Washington, DC. Read the flyer here.

Pro Bono training; SJT and Global Mondays host founder of the Roots Project; Fair housing webinar

Oct. 24: Building Resilience: Using Art to Economically, Socially and Culturally Empower Communities

global1Time: 12:30 to 1:20 p.m.

Date: Monday, Oct. 24, 2016

Place: UW School of Law, Room 117

Speaker: Anyieth D’Awol, Founder the Roots Project. Roots of South Sudan is a 501c3 founded in 2011 to empower South Sudanese women and youth through the preservation of traditional Sudanese arts & crafts. Roots of South Sudan raises funds and facilitates grant applications on behalf of The Roots Project, a Sudanese NGO founded by Anyieth D’Awol. The funds are used to support its facility (located in Juba), the project’s craft activities, equipment and learning materials and provide members with job skills, literacy and math training; and a safe environment for mothers and their young children to work and learn. Read the flyer here.

Oct. 25 SJT: Navigating Times of Rapid Social Change

sjtTime: 12:30 to 1:20 p.m.

Date: Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016

Place: UW School of Law, Room 127

Join us for a conversation with Dr. Joy Williamson-Lott from the UW College of Education. Dr. Williamson-Lott’s primary research agenda examines the reciprocal relationship between social movements–particularly those of the middle twentieth century–and institutions of higher education. She will discuss her research and the current state of social movements across the country with an eye towards how they impact students on campuses like the UW.  Hosted by the UW Law Diversity Committee.

Oct. 25: Advocating for Workplace Justice

Peggy Browning FundTime: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.

Date: Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016

Place: UW School of Law, Room 127

Join the Peggy Browning Fund in hosting a panel, discussion, and reception discussing the rights and needs of workers. Learn about the Peggy Browning Fund’s paid Summer Fellowships ($6,000 & up); network with Labor and Employment Lawyers; free refreshments. Read the flyer here.

Oct. 26: Asylum Application Help (App Help) Training

CHRJ LogoTime: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.

Date: Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016

Place: UW School of Law, Room 127

Interested in human rights work, immigration law, or serving asylum-seekers in the Seattle area? App Help is a student-run project that partners with the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project (NWIRP) to serve asylum-seekers who lack legal representation. Most of the people App Help assists are detained in the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma. We help asylum-seekers fill out their applications for asylum, write declarations about their experiences of persecution, and compile evidence packets in support of their claims. App Help is an excellent opportunity to work directly with clients and gain on-the-ground human rights experience. Interested? Attend the App Help training. Food provided!

Oct. 26: Ensuring Fair Housing for People with Criminal Records: A Conversation with HUD

Shriver CenterTime: 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Date: Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016

Place: Webinar, register here.

Millions of Americans—a disproportionate number of whom are people of color—have criminal records that can be a barrier to housing. Earlier this year, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development issued groundbreaking guidance stating that admission denials, evictions, and other adverse housing decisions based on a person’s criminal record may constitute racial discrimination under the Fair Housing Act.

Join the Shriver Center and officials from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) for a webinar on October 26th to learn answers to pressing questions. The webinar will feature an overview of the guidance, an interview with a HUD official, and a live Q&A session including questions from attendees. The Housing Authority of New Orleans will also discuss its innovative criminal background check policy and how the policy’s focus on individualized assessments will help to improve public safety. Read more here.

 

Oct. 28: Immigrant Family’s Advocacy Project’s annual CLE 

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Time: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Date: Friday, Oct. 28, 2016

Place: Perkins Coie LLP, 1201 Third Ave., Room  4819/4820/4821

The Immigrant Families Advocacy Project is a partnership between Northwest Immigrant Rights Project and UW. Clients are survivors of qualifying crimes who’ve been helpful to police or prosecutors and are eligible for U-Visas. The CLE topics covered include: basic structure of the immigration system; working with immigrant survivors of domestic violence; introduction to U-Visa petitions and adjustment of status; confidentiality and ethics; supervising law students. Email theifap@uw.edu if you’re interested in attending and to learn more.

Exposing human rights violations, Sherman Alexie, and Afghanistan’s political transition

Oct. 10: Indigenous Peoples’ Day Celebration with Sherman Alexie

sherman-alexie

Photo courtesy of The Seattle Office for Civil Rights

Time: 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

Date: Monday, Oct. 10, 2016

Place: Bertha Knight Landes Room, Seattle City Hall  600 4th Avenue

To honor Seattle’s Indigenous Peoples’ Day on the 2nd Monday in October, you are invited to attend a lunchtime event at Seattle City Hall, featuring guest speaker, Native American novelist and poet Sherman Alexie.

Sherman Alexie won the National Book Award for his young-adult novel, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian. Alexie grew up on the Spokane Indian Reservation in Washington, but it wasn’t until a college professor recognized his “intensity of language, passion, and energy” that he fully committed to writing. Shortly after, his first books of poetry were published, and he began developing into a gifted orator, telling tales of contemporary American Indian life with razor-sharp humor, unsettling candor, and biting wit. His novels, such as Reservation Blues, Indian Killer, and The Toughest Indian in the World, have won numerous awards and accolades, including Booklist’s Editor’s Choice Award, the PEN/Malamud Award, and Publishers Weekly’s Book of the Year.

Register and read more here.

Oct. 11 SJT: Closing the Access to Justice Gap in Washington- How You Can Make a Difference through Pro Bono 

sjt

Time: 12:30 to 1:20 p.m.

Date: Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2016

Place: Room 127

Washington state recently underwent a comprehensive study to better understand the civil legal needs of low-income communities. The results are daunting. The good news is that we can all can do something to help close the access to justice gap. Learn about the community need and how law students can be part of the solution. This SJT will feature Jay Doran, Communications & Advocacy Director, Legal Foundation of Washington. If you would like lunch please RSVP via Symplicity.

Oct. 13: Women Pursuing Justice in an Age of Extremism: Afghanistan after Obama
10-13-najla-slider-pic-43155_958x340

Photo courtesy of World Affairs Council

Time: 6:00 to 7:30 p.m.

Date: Thursday, Oct. 13, 2016

Place: Seattle University Law School, 901 12th Ave, Sullivan Hall, Room C-1, Seattle, WA 98122

Please join the World Affairs Council, Channel Foundation, Linksbridge SPC, and the Seattle University Law School Center for Global Justice in welcoming Afghan Judge Najla Ayubi for a moderated discussion with Center for Global Justice Director Dr. Tayyab Mahmud. In this conversation, Judge Ayubi will share her insights on the current social, economic, and security situation in Afghanistan, as well as her unique perspective on the political transition in Afghanistan, and the role of Pakistan and India in Afghanistan’s future.

This event is free to the community but registration is required. Register and read more here. 

Oct. 14: Human Rights Abuses: Expose the Cover-ups

cropped-humanrightsconf-final4_mayTime: 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Date: Friday, Oct. 14, 2016

Place: UW School of Law

Seattle-area partners are hosting a conference on exposing human rights abuses. Keynotes by Vince Warren, Executive Director for the Center for Constitutional Rights, and Almudena Bernabeu, Director of the Center for Justice and Accountability. Register and read more here. 

Photo courtesy of http://exposecoverups.com/

This week: Rights-focused student orgs host first general membership meetings

UW Law Logo

Student Animal Legal Defense Fund (SALDF) General Meeting

Time: 12:30 to 1:20 p.m.

Date: Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2016

Place: Room 116

Student Animal Legal Defense Fund, SALDF, first general meeting of 2016-2017. Food will be provided and animals other than humans will be discussed. In particular, we will talk about SALDF UW’s goals, as well as this year’s possible activities and pro bono projects. Contact Jennifer at jdcalkins2001@me.com with any questions.

Center for Human Rights and Justice (CHRJ) General Membership Meeting

Time: 12:30 to 1:20 p.m.

Date: Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2016

Place: Room 119

Mark your calendars, folks. Wednesday, October 12th in room 119 12:30-1:30pm (lunch) is the General Membership Meeting for the Center for Human Rights and Justice. There will be food, and we will discuss 1L board positions, as well as our fall quarter programming.

The Center for Human Rights and Justice (CHRJ) exists to train University of Washington School of Law students in human rights law and to educate the community in human rights issues. We realize this goal by hosting speakers, symposia, and events on a wide variety of human rights topics. We coordinate human rights projects with area practitioners, lobby for a strong human rights curriculum, and fund student work in human rights through a Public Interest Law Association (PILA) grant.

Black Law Student Association (BLSA) General Meeting

Time: 12:30 to 1:20 p.m.

Date: Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2016

Place: Room 118

Join the Black Law Students Association (BLSA) for the upcoming general meeting. Lunch will be provided.

 

Be sure to check out the play “Force Continuum” at UW!

April 26: RACE TALKS @ 12:30 p.m.- Room 447

taupc7ah_400x400The Dean’s Advisory Committee on Diversity urges you to “drop in” on an ongoing discussion about race, power and the law. This is an ongoing, open-ended conversation. Feel free to stop by anytime between 12:30 and 1:20 to listen and share your thoughts. Professor Brenda Williams will moderate

Lunch will be provided.

April 27: Financial Planning for Grads

taupc7ah_400x400Wednesday, April 27, 12:30-1:20 pm Room 127
Are you worried about repaying your student loans and other debt? Please join us for this informative 50 minute session.

Speakers:

  • Mathiew Le, UW, Assistant Dean Admissions and Financial Aid
  • Aline Carton-Listfjeld, UW, Director, Center for Public Service Law

It is important for law students to master the basics of personal financial management. Basic principles of personal finance are not difficult to learn and apply, but they may seem so because they are rarely explained in a simple, straightforward manner.

This presentation will provide an overview of the fundamentals of personal financial management for law students with little or no prior exposure to the subject. Topics covered will include strategies to track income and expenses, repayment loan options and establish budget priorities including common mistakes to avoid.

April 27-May 8: FORCE CONTINUUM

force820x400_2MFA director Malika Oyetimein will stage Kia Corthron’s explosive socio-political drama about three generations of African American police officers torn apart by the very organization to which they have dedicated their loyalty and working lives. Corthron tells an unflinching and deeply felt story of tragically flawed human beings trying to do the right thing in difficult circumstances and getting it very, very wrong.

As timely now as it was when first produced in 2001, Force Continuum stands as a potent theatrical criticism of modern day police brutality and the relationship between police and the black community.

To buy tickets, click here.

April 27: From Standing in the Street to Having a Seat at the Table

jsternJoin CPSL and Jessica Stern, Executive Director of OutRight Action International for a discussion of OutRight’s work supporting LGBTQI individuals living in the Middle East. OutRight Action International is a leading international organization dedicated to human rights advocacy on behalf of people who experience discrimination or abuse on the basis of their actual or perceived sexual orientation, gender identity or expression. Jessica Stern specializes in gender, sexuality and human rights globally. As the first researcher on LGBT rights at Human Rights Watch and a Ralph Bunche Fellow at Amnesty International, she conducted fact-finding investigations and advocacy in relation to Iran, Kyrgyzstan, South Africa, and the United Arab Emirates. RSVP for this event through Symplicity. Campus location: William H. Gates Hall (LAW). Campus room: Room 138. Event types: Lectures/Seminars.

Event sponsors: The Center for Public Service Law and OutRight Action International. Wednesday, April 27, 2016, 3:30 PM – 4:30 PM.

May 3: SJT – Multi-Parent Adoptions within Washington State

SJTOutlaws is hosting a panel presentation regarding multi-parent adoptions within Washington State. The panel will explain to the audience the fundamentals of how Washington handles adoptions involving more than two legal parents, as well as Washington’s take on custody decisions involving more than two adults when there is a separation or dissolution of one or more adult relationships.

Room 127 at 12:30pm.

May 4: The “Ins and Outs” of Applying for a 2L Summer Position: A Student Panel Discussion and Networking Reception for 1L Students

taupc7ah_400x400Please join LBA and ILS on Wednesday, May 4 for a student panel discussion followed by a networking reception.

The event will begin at 3:30pm in room 138 with a moderated panel of 2L and 3L students who will share their experiences applying for a 2L summer position. Immediately following the panel, there will be reception held in the Gallagher Law Library with local recruiters and attorneys from law firms, government agencies, and public interest organizations. During the reception, students will have the opportunity to meet with attorneys and recruiters and learn more about their organizations. Additionally, students will have the opportunity to speak with current 2L and 3L students who can share lessons, experiences, and tips for researching and applying for a 2L summer position.

Room 138 and Gallagher Law Library at 3:30-6pm

Want to learn more about law-specific LGBTQ identities?

February 16: Introduction to Secondary Trauma & Compassion Fatigue for Advocates

  • How might working with a client in crisis impact the lawyer herself?SJT
  • What is secondary trauma and compassion fatigue? What are the signs?
  • How to do you prevent it from happening?
  • What viable strategies can be used mitigate or reduce its effects?

 Who should attend?

  • Clinical law students
  • Bridging the Gap/Moderate Means Program (MMP) volunteers
  • App Help volunteers
  • Immigrant Families Advocacy Project (IFAP) volunteers
  • Street Youth Legal Advocates of Washington (SYLAW) volunteers
  • Incarcerated Mothers Advocacy Project (IMAP) volunteers
  • or anyone who provides direct legal services to low-income and marginalized communities

 If you would like lunch please RSVP via Symplicity or gatespsl@uw.edu RSVP by 12:00 pm Monday, February 15, 2016.

February 17: Queer 101: A law-specific introduction to queer, trans, and non-binary identities

outlaws_logoWHAT IS THIS?
This training will give an overview of the language and concepts tied to LGBTQ identities, and provide a glimpse into the intersections of queerness and the legal system.

WHO SHOULD GO?
Anyone and everyone!
Particularly those likely to work with queer/trans people (a.k.a. anyone and everyone).

The training will be tailored towards law students and faculty.

YOUR FACILITATORS:
Erika Bleyl is a queer, mixed, femme 2L with a background in working with queer youth. Last summer they interned with TGI Justice Project and provided legal advocacy for transgender incarcerated people.

Nico Quintana is a student at UW Law and a Gates Public Service Scholar. Nico is a queer, trans, chicano activist and policy advocate. Prior to law school, Nico worked on issues of transgender health policy, economic justice and anti-violence work.

Wednesday, February 17, 2016 | 12:30 – 1:30pm | Room 207 | FOOD PROVIDED!

February 17: Access to Justice & the Power of Low Bono Lawyering

taupc7ahPromoting an expansive view of a public interest lawyer’s role, low bono or moderate means lawyering stresses the importance of thinking beyond the traditional public service model of facilitating access to justice. Low bono lawyers provide critical legal services to people of moderate means who don’t qualify for traditional free legal aid but also can’t afford to hire attorneys at a full rate.

Join us for a community dinner and opportunity for students to connect with and learn from inspiring low bono practitioners at the front lines of an expansive view of access to justice law- yering in the 21st century.

Featuring:

  • Jenny Anderson ’07, WSBA Low Bono Section
  • Clay Wilson ‘98, UW Law Bridging the Gap & SU Law Moderate Means Program

For more information, click here: (2016 Annual Public Service Law Dinner FINAL revised)

March 10: “The Right to Unite” screening

seiuNow is an important time for the Supreme Court case Friedrichs v. CTA, which threatens workers’ rights to organize in effective unions. The Court heard oral arguments on January 11. Join us for a special screening of The Right to Unite, our short film highlighting the importance of unions through the stories of two home healthcare workers. Following the film will be discussion about the case and the threat to all workers’ rights posed by the conservative majority.
Reception at 6:00PM | Program at 6:30PM | Refreshments Provided
SEIU 775, 215 Columbia St., Seattle, WA, 98104

May 11:  THE 2016 LEGAL EXECUTIVES DIVERSITY SUMMIT

avatar_dwt_logoSAVE THE DATE!  The 2016 Legal Executives Diversity Summit: Taking Back Affirmative Action – Coordinating Strategic Responses to I-200. Join members of the Washington legal community in discussing the benefits and burdens of I-200 and where to go from here.

1:00 PM AT DAVIS WRIGHT TREMAINE 1201 THIRD AVENUE, SUITE 2200, SEATTLE, WA. Reception following the summit.

 

 

Don’t miss the PILA Auction and these other events!

January 25: “Where Can Your Legal Education Take You?”

globalPlease join us on Monday, 1/25 at 12:30 in room 117 of William H. Gates Hall for an information session hosted by UW Law Global Affairs.

UW law students have many opportunities to study law in foreign countries during their studies, in preparation for a legal career in an increasingly globalized society.

The session will introduce various summer- and quarter-based options available through the Law School and UW, and some key considerations.

January 26: Social Justice Tuesday -Interested In A Career in International Law?

SJTInterested in international criminal law or working in the international courts? Wondering how to step from the local scene to the international stage? Come hear UW alum Kyle Wood speak about his last ten years prosecuting war criminals in the Hague. Mr. Wood recently moved back to Seattle after working in the Office of the Prosecutor at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. Prior to that, he worked in the criminal division of the King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office.

If you would like lunch please RSVP via Symplicity or gatespsl@uw.edu RSVP by 12:00 pm Monday, January 25, 2016.

February 1: American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) hosts Rachel Pulda!

ailalogoLaw students are invited to join the Washington State Chapter of the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) for a AILA meeting especially for law students and new attorneys with Rachel Pulda from AILA in Washington, DC. Please bring your lunch and come join local immigration attorneys for our monthly AILA meeting and training, followed by a session and Q&A especially for students and new attorneys. AILA attorneys look forward to meeting law students interested in immigration law!

Details:

February 1st at Davis Wright Tremaine (1201 3rd Ave #2200, Seattle, WA)

RSVP by January 29th: Brittany Lowe (AILA-WA Co-Chair for the New Member’s Division) brit@brittanylowelegal.com

February 5: 21st Annual PILA Benefit Auction: Off the Races! 

cardraise2At the Husky Union Building (HUB)
Doors open at 5:30 pm.

Register and Purchase tickets here.

Can’t attend this year? You can also donate directly to PILA here.

If you would like to donate items to be auctioned off at this year’s action, please fill out this form.

Why donate to PILA? 2015 Impact Statement

Where is the auction this year, anyway? Directions.

February 23:”Doing Race Better: Race and the Reform of Urban Schools” Featuring Charles M. Payne

payne_346x310How do racial dynamics shape urban schools and school systems? Why does the dominant discourse often define race as a problem? How can taking race more fully into account empower practice?

Please join the University of Washington School of Social Work for an important conversation about these issues with Dr. Charles M. Payne, author of So Much Reform, So Little Change and the forthcoming Schooling the Ghetto: Fifty Years of “Reforming” Urban Schools.

Prior to the lecture, School of Social Work Dean Eddie Uehara will host Dr. Payne and special guests for a reception with hors d’oeuvres and wine.

7:30 p.m., February 23 — Kane Hall
Reception at 6 p.m. in Kane Hall, Walker-Ames Room
Your nametag from the reception will guarantee your seat at the lecture!

RSVP by February 9 to Maya Trachtenberg at 206-543-3532 or mayadt@uw.edu.

Don’t miss this upcoming CLE on wage theft!

Tuesday, January 19: New Year, New You: Take Control of Your Student Loans- Free Debt Relief Webinar Hosted by Equal Justice Works

c4ca2-6a00d8341bfae553ef01b8d1022e63970c-800wiHappy New Year! While everyone else is making plans to hit the gym, we’ve got a better suggestion for your New Year’s Resolution: get a firm handle on your student loans!

Sounds like a lofty goal? No worries – Equal Justice Works is here to help! We’re offering our free monthly webinar, “Drowning in Debt! What Law Students & Lawyers Need to Know about Managing Student Loans & Earning Public Service Loan Forgiveness,” on Tuesday, January 19, 2015 from 3:00 to 4:00 pm EDT to help student loan borrowers plan out their finances just in time for the new year! Whether you’re currently a law student, recent law graduate, or professional attorney, this webinar will provide you with the information you need to know about Public Service Loan Forgiveness, income-driven repayment plans, and more. Come check it out and learn how to manage your student debt!

Also, this webinar will provide valuable information about the Department of Education’s new REPAYE Plan for loan repayment. Equal Justice Works also updated their free student debt e-book Take Control of Your Future to include all the in-depth information you need to know about REPAYE. Download it now to be notified automatically of all updates!

Students for Labor and Employment Justice (SLEJ) Presents Wage Theft: Now and Looking Forward

Photo Credit:https://www.flickr.com/photos/gazeronly/6745112495 

Program includes an overview 6745112495_4473880b49_o.jpgof wage and hour class action litigation,
individual and small group representation, an overview of private lien and bond claim, & new developments in Washington wage and hour law.

Register here!

Date & Time:Friday, February 12, 2016, 8:30 a.m. – 12:45 p.m. 

LocationUniversity of Washington School of Law William H. Gates Hall, Seattle, Washington

CLE Credits: 4.00 CLE Credits Approved

Cost: Bar Members………….$45.00 (includes lunch)
Students………………..Free

 

Social Justice Tuesday:Funding Your Summer Public Service Internship

Tuesday, January 12 12:30-1:20 pm @ Room 127

SJTAre you applying for unpaid summer internships with non-profit organizations or government agencies this summer?
Are you planning to apply for a PILA grant?
Do you want to increase your chances of getting summer funding?

If you’ve answered yes to any of these questions, don’t miss
out on your chance to learn about a variety of summer grants other than PILA for which you will likely be eligible and competitive! Get hot tips and strategic advice from your peers and where to find the resources.

Panelists:

2L, James Carr, Equal Justice America Fellowship Recipient
2L, Ryan Jones, KCBA Labor & Employment Section Summer Grant Recipient
3L, Mariah Hanley, ABA John J. Curtin Fellowship Recipient
3L, Anna Rae Goethe, UW Law Joan Fitzpatrick Fellowship
Aline Carton-Listfjeld, Director, Center for Public Service Law

Hosted by: the Public Interest Law Association, Center for Human Rights & Justice and the Center for Public Service Law

Please RSVP via Symplicity by Monday, January 11

 

 

Attention Law Students! Interested in Networking with the WSBA Sections? Join the WYLC and WSBA Sections in Light Appetizers and Beverages!

January 12: Social Justice Tuesday – Public Service Summer Funding

SJT

Dates: Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2016
Time: 12:30 – 1:20 PM
Location: William H. Gates Hall, RM 127

Come and learn about all of the various funding sources for summer public service employment.

January 14: Equity & Difference: Keeping the Conversation Going – What’s the Difference with “Difference”?

Equity and Difference - Keeping the Conversation Going

Dates: January 14, January 21, February 4, February 10, February 23 2016
Time: 7:30 PM
Location: Kane Hall. RM 120, 4069 Spokane Ln., Seattle, WA 98105

A series that exposes and explains transgressions and struggles—both systematic and personal—experienced by too many in our communities today, featuring thought leaders who are working to open our eyes to the consequences of prejudice, and seeking solutions for change.

January 14th Speaker: Ralina L. Joseph, Director, CCDE, associate professor, department of communication, University of Washington

Today, we often employ the word “difference” as a catch-all word when we talk about race, gender, and sexuality. Difference replaces—or rather revises—‘diversity’, ‘multiculturalism’, or a long-connected string of descriptors such as race, gender, sexuality, class, nationality, and ability. But what does this shift in language mean and why is it significant for the ways in which we assess, inhabit, and perhaps even change our world? How does the Black Lives Matter movement illustrate our need to turn to difference, just as All Lives Matter illustrates the impossibility of indifference today? Can difference, instead of diversity, provide campus activists with a means to fight microaggression and structural racism?  Join Ralina Joseph as we discuss why words matter and how identity descriptions change over time.

For more information, click here.

January 19: New Lawyer Education: Mediation Basics

WSBA Logo

Date: Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2016
Time: 8:25 AM – 3:30 PM
Location: WSBA, 1325 Fourth Ave., Suite 600, Seattle, and via live webcast

CLE Credits: Ethics: 0.50, General: 5.00

Cost: $275

Resolving matters before trial is viewed as best practice. Mediation in particular is becoming a necessary step in many legal processes. In Washington, Chapter 7.06 of the RCW mandates arbitration for certain civil cases. Superior court has mandatory arbitration rules as well. In this seminar, our esteemed faculty will walk you through the world of alternative dispute resolution, with a focus on mediation. They will cover the process of mediation, various mediation styles and models used in Washington, considerations one must take before mediating a case, drafting settlements, and the ethics of mediation. This course is designed from the lens of an attorney representing a client in a mediation proceeding. It is not geared toward those who want to become mediators – although that is discussed briefly in the first session.

For more information, click here.

January 21: Open Sections Night in Seattle

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Date: Thursday, Jan. 21, 2016
Time: 5:00 – 7:00 PM
Location: WSBA Conference Center, 1325 Fourth Ave., Suite 600, Seattle, Washington

You’re invited to attend the Annual Winter Open Sections Night, sponsored by the Washington Young Lawyers Committee (WYLC) and the WSBA Sections. This popular event provides an excellent opportunity to network with young lawyers and experienced lawyers who serve as WSBA section leaders. The WSBA Sections offer a wealth of experience and resources to help new and young lawyers find their footing in a new practice area.

At this event you will:

  • Learn about the WYLC and WSBA sections
  • Have an opportunity to join a section and enter to win a drawing prize
  • Mingle with new and experienced attorneys in a fun, informal atmosphere

Light appetizers and beverages (including beer & wine) will be provided. WSBA Member funds were not used for the purchase of alcoholic beverages.

Register online here.

Join the Conversation with Award-Winning Honduran Activists on Indigenous Environmental Activism!

November 6: CLE on Transgender Health: Making Access to Care a Beauty

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Date: Friday, Nov. 6, 2015
Time: 12:30 PM – 5:00 PM
Location: K&L Gates (925 Fourth Ave, Suite 2900, Seattle)
CLE credits: 4.0 General Credits

Advocates have made great progress in ending discriminatory exclusions against transgender people in health plans issued in Washington State. But many transgender people continue to be denied coverage for medically necessary care by their health insurers and face difficulties navigating the process for appealing denials of coverage.  Please join the QLaw Foundation and community partners for training to learn how to assist transgender clients who are denied coverage by their health insurers. The training is open to attorneys, law students, health care providers, and other advocates who work with transgender clients.

Cost: 

  • Free for QLaw Foundation LGBTQ volunteer attorneys, as well as for attorneys, health care providers, and other advocates who agree to be on call to assist at least one transgender client with a health insurance issue before the end of 2016.
  • $40 for attorneys who are unable to commit to volunteering

To register, click here.

Questions? Contact transhealth@qlawfoundation.org.

November 10: Part Two of Social Justice Tuesday Presentations – Resistance to Immigration Detention: From the Local to the National

SJT

Date: Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2015
Time: 12:30 – 1:20 PM
Location: William H. Gates Hall, RM 127 unless otherwise noted

In the absence of effective immigration reform, the federal government’s use of detention as an immigration enforcement strategy has increased exponentially.  To keep up with the national quota that requires Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to maintain no less than 34,000 immigration detention beds at all times, immigrants, including lawful permanent residents and asylum seekers, are detained for months and sometimes years. Conditions of confinement in immigration detention facilities are deplorable and yet there are no enforceable regulations that govern management of the detention facilities.  Without access to affordable legal services, conditions of confinement often go unaddressed and immigrant detainees remain particularly vulnerable.  While detained individuals and their families suffer greatly, the private prison industry that contracts with the government to oversee immigration detention facilities are using “guaranteed minimum” contract provisions to maintain profits whether the beds are filled or not.  This contract scheme safeguards profits for private companies while incentivizing the incarceration of immigrants. Problematic partnerships between ICE and local law enforcement only exacerbate the problem, leading to the transfer of immigrants from jails and prisons to immigration detention centers.

Our two-part Social Justice Tuesday Presentations will address the proliferation of immigration detention and showcase stories and strategies of resistance and defiance both locally and nationally.

If you would like lunch please RSVP via Symplicity or gatespsl@uw.edu RSVP by 12:00 pm Monday, November 9.

November 16: Increasing Diversity in Legal Leadership: A Managing Partner’s Perspective

UW Law

Date: Monday, Nov. 16, 2015
Time: 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
Location: William H. Gates Hall RM 217

Ben Wilson is the Managing Principal at Beveridge & Diamond, P.C., a Washington, DC-based law firm of 100 attorneys specializing in environmental law.   Mr. Wilson.  A native of Jackson, Mississippi, and a graduate of Dartmouth College and Harvard Law, Mr. Wilson has been with Beveridge & Diamond since 1986.  He has represented the environmental interests of major consumer product corporations, municipal government agencies in major cities, and financial bodies, as well negotiated player contracts on behalf of professional athletes.

Mr. Wilson received the Spirit of Excellence Award in 2014 from the American Bar Association (ABA) Commission on Racial and Ethnic Diversity in the Profession, the Commission’s highest honor. Earlier in 2013, Mr. Wilson received the ABA Section of Environment, Energy, and Natural Resources’ Dedication to Diversity and Justice Award.

Mr. Wilson will visit with students to talk about his experience as a managing partner at a law firm, and to discuss the skills and strategies he advocates widely to increase diversity and promote inclusion at the management levels of legal practice.

Space is limited.  RSVP accepted via Symplicity on a first-come, first-served basis.

November 16: Indigenous Environmental Activism in Central America – A Conversation with Award-Winning Activists Miriam Miranda & Berta Caceres

Honduran Activists Event Poster

Date: Monday, Nov. 16, 2015
Time: 3:30 PM
Location: Thomson Hall 317

Two globally-renowned environmental justice activists will discuss their strategies and struggles to protect the land and natural resources of indigenous peoples in Honduras.  Berta Caceres, winner of the 2015 Goldman Prize, will share how she has rallied the indigenous Lenca people and waged a grassroots campaign that successfully pressured the world’s largest dam builder to pull out of the Agua Zarca Dam.  Miriam Miranda, winner of the 2015 Food Sovereignty Prize, will discuss a landmark legal case that brought Afro-indigenous Garifuna communities to defend their natural resources and land rights against corporate-led development projects.

For more information about the speakers, click here.

December 8: Free Screening with the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project of Underwater Dreams

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Date: Tuesday, Dec. 8, 2015
Time: 6:00 PM
Location: Central Library of the Seattle Public Library

Join NWIRP at the Central Library of the Seattle Public Library on Tuesday, December 8th at 6pm for a free screening of Underwater Dreams, a new documentary by award-winning filmmaker Mary Mazzio and narrated by Michael Peña. Underwater Dreams tells the story of four teenage boys, the sons of Mexican immigrants, who beat MIT in an underwater robotics competition.

For more information about the film, click here.

Want to Learn More about Prison Reform and Immigration Detention? Check Out the Lunch Events This Week!

November 2: End It, Don’t Mend It!: Abolition & the Mainstreaming of Prison and Police Reform

Date: Monday, Nov. 2, 2015
Time: 12:30 – 1:20 PM
Location: William H. Gates Hall, RM 127 unless otherwise noted

IMAP Event Flyer

November 3 & 10: Two-Part Social Justice Tuesday Presentations – Resistance to Immigration Detention: From the Local to the National

SJT

Date: Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2015; Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2015
Time: 12:30 – 1:20 PM
Location: William H. Gates Hall, RM 127 unless otherwise noted

In the absence of effective immigration reform, the federal government’s use of detention as an immigration enforcement strategy has increased exponentially.  To keep up with the national quota that requires Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to maintain no less than 34,000 immigration detention beds at all times, immigrants, including lawful permanent residents and asylum seekers, are detained for months and sometimes years. Conditions of confinement in immigration detention facilities are deplorable and yet there are no enforceable regulations that govern management of the detention facilities.  Without access to affordable legal services, conditions of confinement often go unaddressed and immigrant detainees remain particularly vulnerable.  While detained individuals and their families suffer greatly, the private prison industry that contracts with the government to oversee immigration detention facilities are using “guaranteed minimum” contract provisions to maintain profits whether the beds are filled or not.  This contract scheme safeguards profits for private companies while incentivizing the incarceration of immigrants. Problematic partnerships between ICE and local law enforcement only exacerbate the problem, leading to the transfer of immigrants from jails and prisons to immigration detention centers.

Our two-part Social Justice Tuesday Presentations will address the proliferation of immigration detention and showcase stories and strategies of resistance and defiance both locally and nationally.

Tuesday, Nov. 3rd:  Panel 1:  The Problem and The Local Response:
The first panel will help frame our discussion and bring the problem to life. The panel will highlight immigrant activists who were on the front lines of the hunger strikes at the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma.  Their experiences and insights will lay the foundation a legal advocate from the ACLU of Washington to examine the role of lawyers in the detention resistance efforts.  The panel will conclude with the perspective of a community organizer who is engaged in fighting against the privatization of prisons.

Maru Mora Villalpando, Latino Advocacy /Northwest Detention Center Resistance
Maru Mora Villalpando is a bilingual community organizer, consultant and political analyst with more than 10 years of experience working on immigrant rights and racial justice issues. She is the founder of Latino Advocacy Inc. which provides consulting for non-profits in the areas of policy and membership development, workshops and meetings facilitation.

Margaret Chen, ACLU of Washington
Margaret Chen is a Staff Attorney at the ACLU of Washington  She was one of the attorneys that sought a Temporary Restraining Order (TRO) to prohibit U.S. Immigration and Enforcement (ICE) from retaliating against immigration detainees who engage in First Amendment-protected activities by placing them in solitary confinement.  The lawsuit grew out of events at the Northwest Detention Center (NWDC) in Tacoma, Washington.  Several hundred detainees at (NWDC) initiated a hunger strike to express concerns with national immigration policy and to raise awareness about the conditions of their confinement.  In response, ICE began placing individuals in solitary confinement in retaliation for their support of the hunger strikes.

Andrea Lopez-Diaz, Community Organizer, Ending the Prison Industrial Complex/YUIR
Andrea Lopez-Diaz is a community organizer whose woks focuses on prison reform issues in Washington state.

If you would like lunch please RSVP via Symplicity or gatespsl@uw.edu RSVP by 12:00 pm Monday, November 2.

November 12: Fania Davis – Understanding the Intersection of Restorative and Racial Justice

Fania Davis Flyer

Date: Thursday, Nov. 12, 2015
Time: 6:30 PM
Location: Langston Hughes Performing Arts Institute, 104 17th Ave. S., Seattle, WA 98144

FREE ENTRY.  Join us for a casual reception starting at 5:30 PM.  Light refreshments will be served.

Fania Davis is a founder and current Director of RJOY (Restorative Justice for Oakland Youth). She has been active for many decades in the civil rights, Black liberation, women’s, prisoners’, peace, anti-racial violence and anti-apartheid movements.

Founded in 2005, RJOY focuses on reducing racial disparities by promoting restorative approaches that engage families, communities, and systems. Beginning in 2007, RJOY’s West Oakland Middle School pilot project eliminated violence and expulsions, and reduced suspension rates by 87%.

For more information, click here.


December 10 – 13: Early Bird Rates Ends November 6! Register Now for Conference on Advancing Human Rights 2015 – Sharpening Our Vision, Reclaiming Our Dreams

 

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Date: Thursday, Dec. 10, 2015 – Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015
Time: 5:00 AM EST – 5:00 AM EST
Location: Hilton Austin, 500 E. 4th St., Austin, TX 78701

This year’s conference theme is Sharpening our Vision, Reclaiming our Dreams. This theme reflects the deep need to re-center an economic, social and cultural rights (ESCR) agenda as a key component of our movement work. Building off of Martin Luther King, Jr’s Poor People’s Campaign and his understanding that an end to racial oppression requires addressing poverty and all human rights, we seek to re-affirm and elevate the link between inequality, violence, and the criminalization of economically and politically marginalized groups. Effective human rights movement building demands an intersectional approach in which equal attention is given to the role and impact of race, gender and gender identity, economic and social class, sexuality, disability, age, immigration status and other dimensions of our lives.

For more information, click here.

January 15: Save the Date! King County Bar Association Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Annual Luncheon

KCBA 2016 Luncheon Banner

Date: Friday, Jan. 15, 2015
Time: 12:00 PM
Location: Seattle Sheraton Hotel, 1400 Sixth Ave., Seattle, WA

Keynote Speaker: 

C.T. Vivian

Additional Information about C.T. Vivian

  • Legendary Civil Rights Activist
  • Presidential Civil Rights Advisor
  • Founder, C.T. Vivian Leadership Institute

Please join us on January 15 to honor and celebrate Dr. King’s birthday and his legacy.

Questions, please call the KCBA CLE & Events Department at 206.267.7067.