Join journalist Düzen Tekkal to discuss ISIS, genocide, and her new film

Jan. 24, SJT: Immigration Post-Inauguration: What does Trump mean for sanctuary cities and immigration policy?

UW Law LogoTime: 12:30 to 1:20 p.m.
Date: Tuesday, Jan 24, 2017
Place: UW School of Law, Room 127

Heard about sanctuary cities but not quite sure what they are. Interested in immigration law? Concerned or thoughtful about Donald Trump’s extreme statements and stance on immigration?
Please join CHRJ as we host a panel dedicated to immigration policy in a Trump administration the (Social Justice) Tuesday after inauguration.

Panelists include:
Professor Hugh Spitzer, expert in local government and municipal law
Cuc Vu, director of the Seattle Mayor’s Office of Immigrant and Refugee Affairs
Chris Strawn, UW Immigration Clinic Director and Northwest Immigrant Rights Project attorney
Moderated by Professor Angelica Chazaro, expert in Immigration Law

Jan. 25: Shriver Center’s Fighting Poverty and Advancing Racial Justice in a New Political Landscape

Shriver CenterTime: 10:00 to 10:30 a.m. PST
Date: Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2017
Place: Online

Given the signals from the incoming administration, what should be the focus of an antipoverty and racial justice agenda now? Eight years ago, as the Obama administration was taking shape, the Sargent Shriver National Center on Poverty Law published a 12-point poverty-fighting agenda. Now, as President Obama is set to leave the White House as Donald Trump takes the oath of office on January 20, the Shriver Center has revisited that agenda. Read more and register here.

Jan. 30: Screening of “Hawar — My Journey to Genocide”

screenshot-48Time: 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.
Date: Monday, Jan. 30, 2017
Place: Kane Hall 120, University of Washington

In August 2014, ISIS swarmed over the Iraqi Sinjar region giving the Yazidis the choice to convert or die – leaving 5,000 dead, half a million displaced and more than 3,000 girls and women forced into sexual enslavement. “Hawar” is the story of Düzen Tekkal’s journey back to her Yazidi homeland and her arrival to an ISIS bloodbath. She is an award-winning German journalist and human rights activist of Kurdish-Yazidi origin.

Please join for a film screening and discussion with the renowned filmmaker. Read more here.

Feb. 24: RSVP to the PILA Benefit Auction 

PILA LogoTime: 5:30 p.m.
Date: Friday, Feb. 24, 2017. RSVP by Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2017.
Place: Husky Union Building, University of Washington

The Public Interest Law Association invites you to the 22nd Annual PILA Benefit Auction. This year’s theme is Masquerade Ball—formal attired encouraged.

Save the Date: Washington State Access to Justice Conference

racing-to-justiceTime: All day
Date: Friday, June 2 to June 4, 2017
Place: Yakima Convention Center, Yakima, WA

The Access to Justice (ATJ) Conference is a bi-annual event, being held this year in Yakima on June 2-4. This year, we will feature more opportunities for big picture discussions across disciplines, while also providing space for networking and resource development.  No Conference would be complete without social activities and to that end we will enjoy a reception on Friday evening and libations at a local winery on Saturday evening.

Regardless of where you are in your legal career, and given the shifting sands upon which we all appear to be standing, attendance at this year’s ATJ Conference is more vital than ever. Indeed the Conference’s theme, “Racing to Justice: Community Lawyering to Bend the Arc,” affirms that this is not a time for despair, but for bold life-affirming action that will bring everyone to a place of equity and fairness. We look forward to your attendance at the Conference as together we build a movement where justice for all becomes a reality. Read more and register here.

Not sure how to deal with that one family member at the reunion? SPLC has a guide for responding to everyday bigotry

During a time of great change, civil legal aid may be threatened

screenshot-37Originally published as “Prepare To Dig In To Preserve Civil Legal Aid” by Lonnie A. Powers, executive director of the Massachusetts Legal Assistance Corporation, on the Huffington Post. Image courtesy of the Huffington Post.

“We don’t quite know what to expect from the federal government in the weeks and months ahead in terms of support for civil legal aid. For decades, support for the Legal Services Corporation (LSC), the nonprofit that administers federal funding to legal aid programs across the country, has been seen as a smart investment by members of both parties.” Read the full article here.

SPLC: “Speak Up: Responding to Everyday Bigotry”

SPLC LogoOriginally published by the Southern Poverty Law Center. This guide provides ideas and actions for responding to bigotry and ignorance in everyday life.

“Your brother routinely makes anti-Semitic comments. Your neighbor uses the N-word in casual conversation. Your co-worker ribs you about your Italian surname, asking if you’re in the mafia. Your classmate insults something by saying, “That’s so gay.”

And you stand there, in silence, thinking, “What can I say in response to that?” Or you laugh along, uncomfortably. Or, frustrated or angry, you walk away without saying anything, thinking later, “I should have said something.” Learn how to deal with these types of situations with the Speak Up guide. Read the full guide here.

Shriver Center creates “Racial Justice Training Institute”

Shriver CenterIn the face of a coming transition in federal leadership and deep societal divisions, anti-poverty advocates must understand and address issues of race, implicit bias, and how to affirmatively advance racial equity. The Racial Justice Training Institute is a groundbreaking national leadership program that offers a transformative experience to build and fortify agents for change.

Working in teams, and with support from skilled faculty and coaches, you’ll learn how to use new racial justice knowledge and skills in your daily work and apply these to a racial equity initiative that your team will work on throughout the Institute. Learn more and apply to the institute here.

Register now for the 8th Annual Global Washington conference

Dec. 8: Global Washington conference

global-waTime: 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Date: Thursday, Dec. 8, 2016
Place: Bell Harbor International Conference Center, Seattle, WA

Featured speakers include Shelmina Abji, Advisory Board, United Nations Foundation Girl Up and Former Vice President, IBM; Michael Bowers, Vice President of Humanitarian Leadership and Response, Mercy Corps; Sheri Flies, Assistant General Merchandise Manager, Global Sourcing
Costco Wholesale Corporation; Mary Snapp, Corporate Vice President and President
Microsoft Philanthropies; Simon Winter, Senior Vice President of Development, TechnoServe.

Click here to view the program for the 8th Annual Global Washington conference. Click here to register.

Dec. 14: Supreme Court Recap: Federal Court Access Decisions from an Eight-Member SCOTUS webinar

Shriver CenterTime: 10:00 to 10:30 a.m.
Date: Wednesday, Dec. 14, 2016
Place: Online, register here.

The 2015 Supreme Court Term was unusual because of Justice Scalia’s unexpected death and his still-vacant seat on the Court. How did this eight-member Court rule on issues affecting access to the federal courts?

Join the Shriver Center‘s next Advocacy Exchange, our live monthly video broadcast with advocates advancing change. We’ll talk with Gill Deford of the Center for Medicare Advocacy, Jane Perkins of the National Health Law Program, Gary Smith of Legal Services of Northern California, and Mona Tawatao of the Western Center on Law and Poverty to get their annual recap of the previous Supreme Court Term and its implications for access to the federal courts.

Dec. 14: ABA Webinar on Establishing and Enhancing Legal Clinics to Serve Veterans

abasTime: 10:00 to 11:30 a.m.
Date: Wednesday, Dec. 14, 2016
Place: Online. Register here.

This webinar is designed to inspire and assist civil legal aid organizations, law schools and bar associations in creating legal clinics to serve veterans in their communities.  Speakers will provide instruction on how to establish legal clinics in or near VA Medical Centers, how to establish a legal clinic as a Medical Legal Partnership, and how to create law school clinics that serve veterans.  Discussion will include identification of VA Medical Centers in need of legal clinics and examples of successful urban and rural models around the country.  The panel will also discuss the need to engage in culturally competent practices when representing veterans including referrals to wraparound services to address the needs of veterans and their families holistically.  Speakers will include representatives from the US Department of Veterans Affairs, National Center for Medical Legal Partnerships, civil legal aid organizations, and law school clinic Professors.

ACLU invites you to watch arguments for landmark discrimination case before WA Supreme Court

Nov. 7: Special Lunch with Civil Rights Attorney Jason Downs

UW Law Logo

We are no longer collecting RSVPs. This event is now full. Please join us for the talk at 4pm.

Time: 12:30 to 1:20 p.m.

Date: Monday, Nov. 7, 2016.

Place: UW School of Law, Room 115.

Join for an informal gathering preceding Mr. Downs’ evening presentation. Jason Downs is a trial attorney and partner at the Baltimore firm of Murphy, Falcon & Murphy. Mr. Downs focuses his practice on complex cases involving fraud, conspiracy, and police brutality. He was also a part of the litigation team that investigated and settled the Freddie Gray civil matter for $6.4 million. He is currently part of the litigation team handling a class action in the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals based on the Flint, Michigan water crisis. Also, he currently represents the family of Terrence Sterling in the police-involved shooting in Washington, DC. Read the flyer here.

Nov. 7: Racial Justice in Modern America: From Baltimore to Flint & Beyond

screenshot-2Time: 4 to 5 p.m.

Date: Monday, Nov. 7, 2016.

Place: UW School of Law, Room 133

Jason Downs is a trial attorney and partner at the Baltimore firm of Murphy, Falcon & Murphy. Mr. Downs focuses his practice on complex cases involving fraud, conspiracy, and police brutality. He was also a part of the litigation team that investigated and settled the Freddie Gray civil matter for $6.4 million. He is currently part of the litigation team handling a class action in the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals based on the Flint, Michigan water crisis. Also, he currently represents the family of Terrence Sterling in the police-involved shooting in Washington, DC. Read the flyer here.

November 8: Election Day. Do Your Part-Don’t Forget to Vote!

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November 8: Social Justice Tuesday- Student-Led Pro Bono Projects: Rewards, Challenges & Opportunities

sjt

Time: 12:30-1:20pm

Date: Tuesday, Nov. 8

Place: W.H. Gates Hall room 127

Interested in student-led law-related pro bono projects?  

Curious about what it takes to lead a mini-non-profit organization trying to increasing access to justice to underserved communities?  

Come hear from a panel of your colleagues who are taking on leadership roles with student-led pro bono projects here at UW Law. You’ll learn about the work of these projects and get an opportunity to speak to the students leading the charge. They are eager to share with you the project missions, goals and why there is a need for these kinds of projects here in Washington State. RSVP in Symplicity for lunch.

Nov. 14: Let’s Talk About Justice Speaker Series: “Criminal Justice Reform: National & Local Efforts”

seattle_university_school_of_lawTime: 6:30 to 8 p.m.

Date: Monday, Nov. 14, 2016

Place: Seattle University School of Law, Sullivan Hall

The Let’s Talk About Justice Speaker Series is the first in what we hope will be provocative gatherings featuring change agents, policy makers, and civil legal aid providers discussing issues facing the growing number of low-income families in America. These events will shed light on the important role of civil legal aid in alleviating the effects of poverty and we’ll hear first-hand from our grantees providing legal aid around the state. Featuring Alison Holcomb, ACLU Campaign for Smart Justice, Director and Rhona Taylor, Columbia Legal Services Institutions Project, Director.

Nov. 15: Join the ACLU support the Arlene’s Flowers plaintiffs

ACLU of WATime: 7: 30 a.m.

Date: Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2016

Place: Bellevue College, Carlson Theatre

Curt Freed and Robert Ingersoll wanted flowers for their wedding, but a flower shop in Tri-Cities turned them away because they are gay.  The case is now before the state’s highest court and the ACLU is representing the couple.

Join us on November 15 at 7:30 am at Carlson Theatre on the campus of Bellevue College to support Curt and Rob at oral argument of their case, Ingersoll v. Arlene’s Flowers, before the Washington Supreme Court. We anticipate a large showing of people in support of the florist.  Please join us to show Curt and Rob we support their courageous effort to fight discrimination in Washington state. Discrimination hurts. No one should be turned away from a public business just for being who they are. Businesses open to the general public may not violate anti-discrimination laws, even on the basis of sincerely held religious beliefs.

Please let the ACLU-WA know if you can join us so we have an accurate count.  Here’s to equality!

Nov. 16: Live Broadcast: Making the Case for Community Lawyering

Shriver CenterTime: 10 to 10:30 a.m.

Date: Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2016

Place: Online, register here.

Legal aid lawyers and community organizers may work with the same client groups, but their strategies and perspectives may not always align. Can lawyers and organizers ever work together? Can such a community lawyering practice benefit clients?

Join our next Advocacy Exchange, our live monthly video broadcast with advocates advancing change. We’ll talk with Taylor Healy—a Bread for the City attorney—and Aja Taylor—a Bread for the City organizer—about their community lawyering practice.

 

Pro Bono training; SJT and Global Mondays host founder of the Roots Project; Fair housing webinar

Oct. 24: Building Resilience: Using Art to Economically, Socially and Culturally Empower Communities

global1Time: 12:30 to 1:20 p.m.

Date: Monday, Oct. 24, 2016

Place: UW School of Law, Room 117

Speaker: Anyieth D’Awol, Founder the Roots Project. Roots of South Sudan is a 501c3 founded in 2011 to empower South Sudanese women and youth through the preservation of traditional Sudanese arts & crafts. Roots of South Sudan raises funds and facilitates grant applications on behalf of The Roots Project, a Sudanese NGO founded by Anyieth D’Awol. The funds are used to support its facility (located in Juba), the project’s craft activities, equipment and learning materials and provide members with job skills, literacy and math training; and a safe environment for mothers and their young children to work and learn. Read the flyer here.

Oct. 25 SJT: Navigating Times of Rapid Social Change

sjtTime: 12:30 to 1:20 p.m.

Date: Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016

Place: UW School of Law, Room 127

Join us for a conversation with Dr. Joy Williamson-Lott from the UW College of Education. Dr. Williamson-Lott’s primary research agenda examines the reciprocal relationship between social movements–particularly those of the middle twentieth century–and institutions of higher education. She will discuss her research and the current state of social movements across the country with an eye towards how they impact students on campuses like the UW.  Hosted by the UW Law Diversity Committee.

Oct. 25: Advocating for Workplace Justice

Peggy Browning FundTime: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.

Date: Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016

Place: UW School of Law, Room 127

Join the Peggy Browning Fund in hosting a panel, discussion, and reception discussing the rights and needs of workers. Learn about the Peggy Browning Fund’s paid Summer Fellowships ($6,000 & up); network with Labor and Employment Lawyers; free refreshments. Read the flyer here.

Oct. 26: Asylum Application Help (App Help) Training

CHRJ LogoTime: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.

Date: Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016

Place: UW School of Law, Room 127

Interested in human rights work, immigration law, or serving asylum-seekers in the Seattle area? App Help is a student-run project that partners with the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project (NWIRP) to serve asylum-seekers who lack legal representation. Most of the people App Help assists are detained in the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma. We help asylum-seekers fill out their applications for asylum, write declarations about their experiences of persecution, and compile evidence packets in support of their claims. App Help is an excellent opportunity to work directly with clients and gain on-the-ground human rights experience. Interested? Attend the App Help training. Food provided!

Oct. 26: Ensuring Fair Housing for People with Criminal Records: A Conversation with HUD

Shriver CenterTime: 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Date: Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016

Place: Webinar, register here.

Millions of Americans—a disproportionate number of whom are people of color—have criminal records that can be a barrier to housing. Earlier this year, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development issued groundbreaking guidance stating that admission denials, evictions, and other adverse housing decisions based on a person’s criminal record may constitute racial discrimination under the Fair Housing Act.

Join the Shriver Center and officials from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) for a webinar on October 26th to learn answers to pressing questions. The webinar will feature an overview of the guidance, an interview with a HUD official, and a live Q&A session including questions from attendees. The Housing Authority of New Orleans will also discuss its innovative criminal background check policy and how the policy’s focus on individualized assessments will help to improve public safety. Read more here.

 

Oct. 28: Immigrant Family’s Advocacy Project’s annual CLE 

here

Time: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Date: Friday, Oct. 28, 2016

Place: Perkins Coie LLP, 1201 Third Ave., Room  4819/4820/4821

The Immigrant Families Advocacy Project is a partnership between Northwest Immigrant Rights Project and UW. Clients are survivors of qualifying crimes who’ve been helpful to police or prosecutors and are eligible for U-Visas. The CLE topics covered include: basic structure of the immigration system; working with immigrant survivors of domestic violence; introduction to U-Visa petitions and adjustment of status; confidentiality and ethics; supervising law students. Email theifap@uw.edu if you’re interested in attending and to learn more.

Want to Get Plugged In To the Community? Volunteer Opportunities at ELAP

Volunteer Opportunities with Eastside Legal Assistance Program (ELAP)

ELAP Logo

ELAP is in need of volunteers in several areas. Here are two great opportunities. Come help make equal access to justice in our community a reality by assisting ELAP in one of these areas.

ELAP Intern Videographer – Do you like being behind the camera, capturing important moments?  Or creating videos that move people to action? Come help make equal access to justice in our community a reality by assisting Eastside Legal Assistance Program (ELAP) in producing a variety of content for powerful, thought provoking videos that tell our story and get people on board with our mission.   The Intern Videographer will work closely with our Lead Videographer on various multi-media projects.  The goal of this effort is to record video CLEs for our online CLE library, increase the visibility and awareness of ELAP services, and to encourage a greater understanding of ELAP’s mission.  Please click here for more details.

ELAP Family Law Legal Support – Do you have legal assistant skills or experience and want to use these skills to help survivors of domestic violence? Come make equal access to justice in our community a reality by assisting Eastside Legal Assistance Program (ELAP) staff attorneys.  Note: this position is based out of the Domestic Abuse Women’s Network (DAWN) offices in Tukwila,WA to support the ELAP DV Staff Attorney placed on-site at DAWN.  Please click here for more details.

To volunteer, fill out a volunteer applicationELAP also has other volunteer opportunities which are listed on the volunteer page on our website.

Federal Practice Manual for Legal Aid Attorneys

Shriver Center

The Shriver Center’s Federal Practice Manual for Legal Aid Attorneys covers all stages of federal litigation, from drafting and filing the complaint to trial practice and limitations on relief. This popular resource, available free of charge online, includes relevant recent caselaw and legal developments. Edited by Jeffrey S. Gutman, Professor of Clinical Law at George Washington University Law School, with the assistance of a group of experienced legal aid advocates, the manual includes links to federal statutes, Supreme Court case citations, and relevant regulations. Moreover, the full text of the manual is searchable by keyword.

Click here for more information.

PLI Offering Free Prison Law Webcast on 10/30

PLI logo

Live Webcast – October 30, 2014

Co-Chairs:
Tamar Kraft-StolarDirector, Women in Prison Project, Correctional Association of
New York
Alexander A. ReinertProfessor of Law, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law

Join PLI’s Webcast of Prison Law 2014 on October 30, 2014 and learn about the legal framework for civil litigation filed on behalf of incarcerated people across the country. Experienced faculty will discuss women in prison, including legal issues that arise for these women, the role of gender and gender identity in prisons, and client-based issues and non-litigation advocacy reforms. By watching this Webcast program, advocates will learn how to better navigate this frequently complex and challenging legal environment.

Click here for more information.

The Cork Online Law Review at University College Cork, Ireland Calling for Submissions, Due 1/16/15

Cork Online Law Review

The Cork Online Law Review at University College Cork, Ireland is a non-profit Law Review which provides an opportunity for undergraduates and graduates alike, to have their work published. The Cork Online Law Review (more fondly known as COLR) was revolutionary when established by law students who had the vision of forming Ireland’s only online law review to be run solely by law students.  The Cork Online Law Review is internationally renowned, having been described by the New York University Law Faculty as ‘the leading online law review in Ireland,’ and can be viewed at http://corkonlinelawreview.com.

The Editorial Board of the Cork Online Law Review is currently seeking submissions for the 14th Edition which is due to be published online here and in hard copy on the 26th March 2015. All submissions should be on a legal topic, and be between three and nine thousand words in length. Submissions are also welcome in Irish, French and German. Book reviews and case notes will also be considered. We use the Oxford Style guide as our house style guide.

There is a medal for the overall best submission, with an accompanying cash prize of €300. There is also a medal for best non-English submission.

The closing date for submissions is 16th January 2015. All interested parties should submit their articles and enquiries to Kate Murphy: editor@corkonlinelawreview.com.

Register for PLI’s Free Seminar on Unaccompanied Immigrant Children – Effective Representation 2014

PLI logo

Date: 11/25/14
Location: Online
Time: 9:00 AM EST / 6:00 AM PST
Attorneys interested in representing unaccompanied immigrant children will learn the framework for legal relief for these clients and effective strategies for working with children.
What you will learn:
  • How removal proceedings against children are conducted, and some of the key affirmative defenses available under US immigration law
  • Eligibility requirements and procedural steps in seeking special immigrant juvenile status, a remedy for certain children subjected to maltreatment by one or both parents
  • Eligibility requirements and procedural steps in seeking asylum as an unaccompanied child
  • Best practices in representing children

Register online here.

Pro Bono Service Opportunity with the Volunteer Tax & Loan Program in Alaska

VTLP

The Alaska Business Development Center, Inc. (ABDC), a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization based in Anchorage, Alaska, has been providing a wide spectrum of business consulting services to rural Alaska since 1978. ABDC created the Volunteer Tax and Loan Program (VTLP) after recognizing the need for quality tax services in the isolated, rural communities of Alaska that are very often only accessible by small aircraft. Since 1996, VTLP has strived to provide quality tax preparation services and education on taxpayer rights and obligations to rural residents across the state.

VTLP is seeking volunteers from various professions and local universities to participate in the program. Volunteers will be trained as either a tax preparer or educator/team leader, or both.  Volunteers typically travel in teams of two to four volunteers, one educator/leader and up to three preparers based on the needs of the community.  The weekend trips are three to four days, depending upon flight schedules, while the week long trips are for a week and typically service multiple communities. Prior tax experience is helpful but not required.

To participate, submit a completed application and attend an interview.

For more information, please click here.  The application is accessible here.  Click here for the flyer.

The VTLP qualifies for recognition for the Pro Bono Honors Society.  Track your hours and submit them for recognition at graduation!

Racial Justice Training Institute, ATJ Essay Contest & Using the Human Rights Framework in the U.S.

The Shriver Center Announces New Racial Justice Training Institute

Racial Justice Institute

Fifty years after the Civil Rights Movement and the launch of the War on Poverty, the inextricable links between race and poverty continue. Marking these two anniversaries and recognizing the critical role that lawyers and advocates can play in advancing racial equity, the Sargent Shriver National Center on Poverty Law announces the first Racial Justice Training Institute. By placing tools of race conscious advocacy in the hands of front line advocates, the Institute will ensure that race is front and center in our efforts to eradicate poverty in the communities we serve. 

The Institute will cover a wide range of equity best practices ranging from traditional litigation and policy advocacy to media and messaging to the latest debiasing strategies. Working in race-equity teams, and with support from skilled faculty and facilitators, participants will use new racial justice knowledge and skills in their daily work and in the race-equity initiatives that teams will pursue throughout the Institute.

Taking place over seven months (late May-November 2014), the Institute includes three parts:

PART 1: Online (May 26 – June 13, 2014)

PART 2: Onsite in Chicago (June 17-20, 2014)

PART 3: Online (July – November 2014)

Up to 35 advocates will be selected for the first Institute cohort based on a variety of factors, including experience, interest, goals, capacity, and racial and geographic diversity.

Learn more about the Racial Justice Training Institute

Application Deadline: February 14, 2014

A Different Lens: Applying a Human Rights Framework to Disparities in the United States

PRRACbanner1by Salimah Hankins & Balthazar Becker in the current issue of Poverty
& Race
of the Poverty & Race Research Action Council.

Despite its complicated history in American politics and activism, human rights discourse is emerging once more as a powerful alternative framework to scrutinize issues related to poverty and race in the United States. This article offers a brief introduction of the U.S. Human Rights Network’s (USHRN) 2013 report, “Advancing Human Rights: A Status Report on Human Rights in the United States,” which outlines the implications of human rights as they relate, among other things, to housing, education and the criminal justice system. The article highlights pivotal policies reviewed in the report and examines the ways in which a human rights lens can provide a public forum for resolving civil rights abuses on a national level.

While the language of civil rights, revolving around the U.S. Constitution, usually dominates much of mainstream discourse in this nation, for at least 65 years there has existed an alternative ethical and legal horizon. African-American organizations and individuals instantly recognized the rhetorical power and political potential of the emerging human rights discourse at its onset in response to the ravages of World War II and the Holocaust. Fully aware of the inherent contradiction of the United States’ ascension to moral world leadership— while the nation was holding on to a system of segregation in the South and practicing unequal access in a variety of areas, including housing and education— the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and others had, in Carol Anderson’s words, “already decided that only human rights could repair the damage that more than three centuries of slavery, Jim Crow, and racism had done to the African American community.” Continue reading here.

$5000 Access to Justice Essay Contest Sponsored by Public Justice 

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