UW to host Civil Rights attorney Jason Downs, lawyer on Freddie Gray and Flint, Mich. cases

Nov. 1 SJT: Public Defense’s Role in Advancing Social Justice

SJTTime: 12:30 to 1:20 p.m.

Date: Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016.

Place: UW School of Law, Room 127.

This event will provide an introduction to the defenders; Seattle’s front-line soldiers in the battle for criminal justice reform. Besides providing legal representation to indigent clients in several practice areas, the King County Department of Public Defense also works to address racial disproportionality in the criminal justice system, the collateral consequences of justice involvement, and other structural issues that undermine the rights of the criminally accused. DPD representatives will speak to their own experience in criminal law, as well as their role in justice reform movements currently underway here in King County.

Panelists include: La Mer Kyle-Griffiths is the Training Director for the King County Department of Public Defense in Seattle, WA. Before that, she practiced for over 15 years as a public defender in both Kentucky and Massachusetts. She has tried juvenile, adult and a death penalty case as well as arguing two cases to the Kentucky Supreme court; Amy Parker has been serving as a public defense attorney in King County for more than a decade, and recently served as the interim supervisor for the Associated Counsel for the Accused at Seattle Municipal Court. She is a leader in the public defense community and a respected litigator who has brought multiple felony cases to trial; Sade Smith grew up in Pullman, Washington and graduated from the University of Illinois College of Law in 2011. Sade entered public defense shortly after graduation as a public defender in Burlington and Mount Vernon. Since 2014 she has been on case load with the Northwest Defenders Division of the King County Department of Public Defense.

Nov. 1: Panel on I-732: WA Carbon Tax Proposal

elslogoTime: 12:30 to 1:20 p.m.

Date: Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016.

Place: UW School of Law, Room 117.

Please join the Environmental Law Society for a 4-person panel to discuss the proposed Carbon Tax initiative, I-732, on the ballots for this election. Dr. Todd Wildermuth will be moderating the panel, which will include two panelists discussing support for the initiative and two panelists discussing opposition against the initiative. Panelists in support of I-732 will include representatives from Carbon WA and Audobon. Panelists in opposition to I-732 will include representatives from the Washington State Labor Council and One America.

Please join the Environmental Law Society for this great panel to learn more about the controversial Carbon Tax proposal in Washington and gain more insight to make an informed vote this voting season. Food will be provided and a 15-minute open Q&A session will allow for interested parties to ask questions from the panelists.

Nov. 1: Rape on the Night Shift Film Showing

PILA LogoTime: 6 to 9 p.m.

Date: Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016.

Place: UW School of Law, Room 127

The Public Interest Law Association (PILA) is hosting a showing of Rape on the Night Shift, a news investigation into the sexual abuse of immigrant women in the janitorial industry. Please join us for the film showing and a panel discussion that will follow the film. The panel will feature speakers from API Chaya, UNITE HERE! Local 8, and U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Food will be provided.

Nov. 4: Sexual Assault Trauma-Informed Victim Empowerment (STRIVE): Sexual Assault Protection Orders and Victim Rights

logo_ywcaTime: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Date: Friday, Nov. 4, 2016.

Place: Davis Wright Tremaine LLP, 1201 Third Ave., Suite 2200, Seattle, WA 98101

This CLE by the Sexual Violence Legal Services – YWCA will introduce participants to the unique legal needs of sexual assault survivors when seeking a civil protection order or protecting their privacy rights in criminal cases.  The program will provide an in-depth and interactive examination of Washington laws and statutes protecting survivors of sexual violence, along with ethical considerations when representing them.  Participants may earn up to an additional 24 CLE credits representing an SVLS-referred pro bono client.  Agenda and registration at here.

Nov. 7: Special Lunch with Civil Rights Attorney Jason Downs

UW Law LogoTime: 12:30 to 1:20 p.m.

Date: Monday, Nov. 7, 2016.

Place: UW School of Law, Room 115.

Join for an informal gathering preceding Mr. Downs’ evening presentation. Jason Downs is a trial attorney and partner at the Baltimore firm of Murphy, Falcon & Murphy. Mr. Downs focuses his practice on complex cases involving fraud, conspiracy, and police brutality. He was also a part of the litigation team that investigated and settled the Freddie Gray civil matter for $6.4 million. He is currently part of the litigation team handling a class action in the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals based on the Flint, Michigan water crisis. Also, he currently represents the family of Terrence Sterling in the police-involved shooting in Washington, DC. Read the flyer here.

Nov. 7: Racial Justice in Modern America: From Baltimore to Flint & Beyond

screenshot-2Time: 4 to 5 p.m.

Date: Monday, Nov. 7, 2016.

Place: UW School of Law, Room 133

Jason Downs is a trial attorney and partner at the Baltimore firm of Murphy, Falcon & Murphy. Mr. Downs focuses his practice on complex cases involving fraud, conspiracy, and police brutality. He was also a part of the litigation team that investigated and settled the Freddie Gray civil matter for $6.4 million. He is currently part of the litigation team handling a class action in the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals based on the Flint, Michigan water crisis. Also, he currently represents the family of Terrence Sterling in the police-involved shooting in Washington, DC. Read the flyer here.

Accountability Counsel is keeping an eye out for UW Law students for two fellowships & other job opportunities!

King County Public Defenders are seeking summer interns!

1280px-logo_of_king_county_washington-svgSummer 2016 1L Intern Announcement

The Department of Public Defense is a new King County department, providing indigent defense in all of the major case areas and serving more than 15,000 clients a year. It has four divisions, each with its own staff of lawyers, investigators, social workers, paralegals, docket clerks, and more. Those divisions – previously nonprofit law firms that provided public defense – are: Associated Counsel for the Accused (ACA), Northwest Defenders Association (NDA), Society of Counsel Representing Accused Persons (SCRAP) and The Defender Association (TDA).  The Director’s Office oversees policy development, staff training and caseload management and provides administrative support to the four divisions.

 There are opportunities for One L students to intern at one of these divisions or within the Director’s Office over the summer of 2016 and receive a variety of experiences. One L interns will be asked to assist in the research and writing of issues for the benefit of our indigent clients in the practice areas of Misdemeanor, Juvenile, Felony, Sex Offender Commitment, Involuntary Commitment, Dependency, Therapeutic Courts and more. A one L intern will be able to view various substantive court hearings, assist with preparation for such hearings, meet clients, visit the jail/other facilities where our clients are housed, assist with investigations, record gathering, and more.  Within the Director’s Office, interns will assist in editing and gathering resources and briefs, policy drafting, legislative responses and other macro-level functions to assist defenders and their clients. Possible placements are in Seattle, Redmond or Kent. All offices are accessible via public transportation.  All hiring will occur centrally.

 Contact La Mer Kyle-Griffiths, Training Director, at Lamer.kyle-griffiths@kingcounty.gov.  Materials requested are a cover letter, resume, writing sample and at least three references.  Please also mention your preferred start and end dates, as well as any geographic preference.

 Summer 2016 2L/3L Intern Announcement

The Department of Public Defense is a new King County department, providing indigent defense in all of the major case areas and serving more than 15,000 clients a year. It has four divisions, each with its own staff of lawyers, investigators, social workers, paralegals, docket clerks, and more. Those divisions – previously nonprofit law firms that provided public defense – are: Associated Counsel for the Accused (ACA), Northwest Defenders Association (NDA), Society of Counsel Representing Accused Persons (SCRAP) and The Defender Association (TDA).  The Director’s Office oversees policy development, staff training and caseload management and provides administrative support to the four divisions.

 There are opportunities for Rule 9-qualified students to intern at one of these divisions or within the Director’s Office over the summer of 2016 and receive a variety of experiences. Rule 9 interns will be able to represent clients, receiving active supervision and intensive training in both procedure and trial skills. In addition, Rule 9 students will be asked to assist in the research and writing of issues for the benefit of our indigent clients in the practice areas of Misdemeanor, Juvenile, Felony, Sex Offender Commitment, Involuntary Commitment, Dependency, Therapeutic Courts and more. Rule 9 students will also be able to view various substantive court hearings, assist with preparation for such hearings, meet clients, visit the jail and other facilities where our clients are housed, and assist with investigations, record gathering, and more.  There will also be positions in the Director’s Office, where 2Ls and 3Ls will assist in editing and gathering resources and briefs, policy drafting, legislative response, and other macro-level functions to assist defenders and their clients. Possible placements are in Seattle, Redmond or Kent. All offices are accessible via public transportation.  All hiring will occur centrally.

Contact La Mer Kyle-Griffiths, Training Director, at Lamer.kyle-griffiths@kingcounty.gov.  Materials requested are a cover letter, resume, writing sample and at least three references.  Please also mention your preferred start and end dates as well as any geographic preference.

Jackson County, OR – Deputy District Attorney I (District Attorney Criminal Division)

nlwvciovProvides legal representation to prosecute a broad range of crimes in Circuit Court. May prepare and handle child support enforcement and modification hearings and trials. May prepare and present juvenile delinquency and dependency matters in the Circuit Court.

Examples of Essential Position Duties

  • Reviews and evaluates factual and legal bases for cases filed to determine legal sufficiency. Prepares charges to be filed with the court.
  • Prepares for motion hearings and trial through witness interviews, legal research, and investigation of facts and information; drafts, prepares, and files appropriate legal documents. Consults with law enforcement personnel regarding cases.
  • Evaluates cases for appropriate disposition; prepares for and participates in plea negotiations with defense counsel as necessary.
  • Organizes cases for trial; drafts and files legal documents and prepares questions and arguments necessary for hearings or trials; notifies and interviews witnesses; reviews evidence.
  • Under general direction, conducts courtroom proceedings; determines strategy, organization, evidence presentation, appearance of witnesses, and jury instructions.
  • Remains current on new laws, regulations, and procedures.
  • Answers questions and provides information to law enforcement personnel, the public, victims, and others regarding general legal principles, the court process, and other related matters.
  • Adheres to County and departmental policies and procedures as well as safe work practices, policies and procedures.
  • Develops and maintains effective working relationships with other staff, public officials, the general public and representatives of other agencies.
  • Attends and participates in required trainings.
  • Has regular and reliable attendance.
  • Working irregular hours is required.
  • Performs other related duties as assigned.

For more information about the position, click here.

The Office of Labor Standards is accepting applications for the position of Labor Standards Investigator

city_logoAs a leader on wage, labor and workforce practices that enhance equity, address wage gaps and create a fair and health economy for workers, businesses and residents, the City of Seattle created an Office of Labor Standards (OLS) in late 2014. OLS implements City ordinances on minimum wage, paid sick and safe time, use of criminal history in employment decisions, wage theft and other laws that the City may enact in the future. OLS is housed within the Seattle Office for Civil Rights (SOCR).

The Labor Standards Investigator position is a full-time emergency position with funding through December 31, 2016.

This position will be responsible for receiving and processing intakes, drafting complaints, and handling a complex caseload requiring investigation and resolution of complaints of violations of the Paid Sick and Safe Time Ordinance, Fair Chance Employment Ordinance (formerly known as the Job Assistance Ordinance), Minimum Wage Ordinance, Administrative Wage Theft Ordinance, and dual-filed discrimination cases in employment.
Applications close on Tuesday, February 2, 2016 at 4 pm.

Click here to apply.

Accountability Counsel is keeping an eye out for UW Law students for these two fellowships!

ac-logo-20141-300x75Washington, D.C.-based Policy Fellows

Policy Fellows will support Accountability Counsel in promoting corporate and government accountability and the protection of human and environmental rights. In this context, Fellows help advance our policy work toward the improvement of accountability mechanisms and their creation where they do not exist. Responsibilities include: conducting research and policy analysis; producing memos; reporting on international and domestic legal/policy developments; supporting our coalition-building efforts; and assisting with the development and implementation of advocacy strategies and campaigns. Fellows will participate in meetings with stakeholders in government, business, international institutions, and partner organizations, as appropriate.

Positions are unpaid, but we will be happy to work with your institution to arrange academic credit. We accept applications for semester- and year-long positions from law students, graduate students and recent graduates (within on year of graduation) in relevant fields. Please note that law student applicants are expected to have finished at least their 1L year.

Our Summer 2016 Policy Fellow application can be found here.  We will begin reviewing Summer Policy Fellow applications in January and will accept applications until the positions are filled. (Note for Law School student applicants: We will accept applications from 1Ls beginning December 1st. For 2Ls and higher, we accept applications on a rolling basis.)

Washington, D.C.-based South Asia Law Fellows

South Asia Law Fellows will primarily support Accountability Counsel in collaboration with South Asia-based communities in filing complaints and our development of resource materials for communities and advocates. South Asia Law Fellows will work with AC’s South Asia Director and be responsibly for legal research assignments and fact memos. They also may participate in meetings with community members, international institutions, and NGO colleagues as opportunities arise.

Positions are unpaid, but we will be happy to work with your institution to arrange academic credit. We accept applications from current law and graduate students and recent graduates (within one year of graduation). Please note that law student applicants are expected to have finished at least their 1L year.

Our Summer 2016 Washington, D.C.-based South Asia Law Fellow application can be found here. We will being reviewing South Asia Law Fellow applications beginning February 1st and will accept applications until the positions are filled

For more information, click here.

AMERICAN CIVIL LIBERTIES UNION (ACLU) – Fall 2016 Legal Internship Opportunity; Racial Justice Program, New York (NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS) 

15_1For nearly 100 years, the ACLU has been our nation’s guardian of liberty, working in courts, legislatures, and communities to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties that the Constitution and the laws of the United States guarantee everyone in this country. Whether it’s achieving full equality for the LGBT community, establishing new privacy protections for our digital age, ending mass incarceration, or preserving the right to vote or the right to have an abortion, the ACLU takes up the toughest civil liberties cases and issues to defend all people from government abuse and overreach. With more than a million members, activists, and supporters, the ACLU is a nationwide organization that fights tirelessly in all 50 states, Puerto Rico, and Washington, D.C., for the principle that every individual’s rights must be protected equally under the law, regardless of race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, disability or national origin.

 The Racial Justice Program of the ACLU’s National Office in New York City seeks legal interns for the Fall of 2016. A stipend is available for those students who do not receive outside funding and/or course credit.  Arrangements can also be made with the students’ law school for work/study stipends or course credit.

Applicants should send a cover letter, describing their interest in racial justice issues and civil liberties, including any relevant life or work experience gained before or during law school; a resume and two references, an official or unofficial transcript, and a legal writing sample of no more than ten pages in length, to hrjobsRJP@aclu.org reference [RJP Fall 2016 Legal Internship/ACLU-W] in the subject line. Please note that this is not the general ACLU applicant email address.  This email address is specific to Racial Justice Program postings. In order to ensure your application is received please make certain it is sent to the correct e-mail address. 

For more information, click here.

HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH – DISABILITY RIGHTS RESEARCHER/ADVOCATE

2000px-hrw_logo-svgThe Disability Rights Division (“DRD”) of Human Rights Watch (“HRW”) is seeking highly qualified applicants for the position of Disability Rights Researcher/Advocate. This position will be responsible for developing and implementing research and advocacy strategies on the human rights of persons with disabilities.  Ideally, the position will be based in HRW’s New York office and will report to the Director of the Disability Rights Division.

Contact: Please apply immediately or by  February 22, 2016 by emailing, in a single submission, a letter of interest describing your experience, resume, contact details for three references, and a brief writing sample (unedited by others) to disability@hrw.org. Please use “Disability Rights Researcher/Advocate Application Ref: DRD-16-1002” as the subject of your email. 

For more information, click here

CENTER FOR SCIENCE IN THE PUBLIC INTEREST (CSPI) – 2016 FOOD LAW & REGULATORY POLICY INTERNSHIP

WordPerfect CSPI with NAH color logoThe Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) is a non-profit health-advocacy group based in Washington, D.C., that focuses on nutrition and food safety.  CSPI publishes Nutrition Action Healthletter, the nation’s largest?circulation nutrition newsletter.  CSPI provides valuable, objective information to the public, represents citizens’ interests before governmental bodies, and serves as a watchdog over industry.  CSPI is supported by the subscribers to Nutrition Action, donors, and foundation grants.

CSPI’s food-regulation team, working with staff scientists, led efforts to win passage of the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act and Food Allergen Consumer Protection Act; restrict the use of unsafe food additives; stop numerous deceptive ads and labels; and reduce amounts of sodium and trans fat in processed food.  The Food Law and Regulatory project leads CSPI’s efforts to use regulation, legislation, and other strategies to promote smarter government policies and better corporate practices to improve the public’s health. 

We’re searching for a bright, hardworking law student to work closely with the Director of Regulatory Affairs on food labeling and misbranding, food additives and government oversight of the food supply before federal agencies and in Congress. The work involves legislative analysis and regulatory filings as well as litigation over principles of administrative law and food law. Projects may involve research for policy analysis and development, op-ed pieces, reports, tracking regulation and legislation and assisting in ongoing policy advocacy. Applicants should have a strong background in public interest advocacy and must submit a non-technical writing sample (i.e., not a legal memo) as part of their application.

To apply, please email a cover letter indicating dates of availability, resume, and legal writing sample, to hr@cspinet.org.  Please include “PSJD-FL” in the email subject line.   

For more information, click here

City of Seattle releases “Race & Social Justice Community Survey”

New CAGJ Webinar: “Linking Food Justice to Trade Policy”

3815441846_4f038805b5_o_dWebinar: “Linking Food Justice to Trade Policy”
A 30 min. webinar (on you-tube) about how food justice and food sovereignty are threatened by new (so-called) free-trade agreements,  the TPP/Trans-Pacific Partnership, and TTIP/Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership.
Background:

  • About Food Sovereignty & Fair Trade, What is Fair about Free Trade? What is Fast Track?
  • Corporate Influence on Free Trade Agreements (FTAs), Impacts of NAFTA on Mexico, FTAs and the Domestic Economy, Currently proposed Trade Agreements

After Overpayment Of Benefits, VA Wanted $38,000 Back – Patricia Murphy

clayhull-2015-8edit_custom-afe9e1889c09769894f8e31e7c7abe20fabeafa0-s800-c85Clay Hull has a stubborn sense of justice.

After an improvised explosive device blast in Iraq ended his time in the military, he fought the Army and the Department of Veterans Affairs over the amount of compensation they awarded him for his injuries.

“If I’m in the wrong, I’ll admit it. But I’m not going to let somebody just push me around, especially the VA,” he says.

It was complicated and drawn out, but Hull now gets the maximum the VA pays for disability.

The money pays for his mortgage, support for his young son and feed for the livestock on Hull’s 3 acres in south central Washington — 2 1/2 hours from Seattle.

He has a day job as a shipping clerk and then comes home to work on his place. He’s currently fixing a fence that runs along his property line.

Four years after he moved in, Hull went to prison on a weapons charge. Hull notified the VA he was in prison.

Continue reading here

Photo credit: Gordon King for NPR

AP: Feds imperiled many migrant kids during surge

4556659182_c4981bc62d_o_dLOS ANGELES — As tens of thousands of children fleeing violence in Central America crossed the border in search of safe harbor, overwhelmed U.S. officials weakened child protection policies, placing some young migrants in homes where they were sexually assaulted, starved or forced to work for little or no pay, an Associated Press investigation has found.

Without enough beds to house the record numbers of young arrivals, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services lowered its safety standards during border surges in the last three years to swiftly move children out of government shelters and into sponsors’ homes. The procedures were increasingly relaxed as the number of young migrants rose in response to spiraling gang and drug violence in Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador, according to emails, agency memos and operations manuals obtained by AP, some under the Freedom of Information Act.

First, the government stopped fingerprinting most adults seeking to claim the children. In April 2014, the agency stopped requiring original copies of birth certificates to prove most sponsors’ identities. The next month, it decided not to complete forms that request sponsors’ personal and identifying information before sending many of the children to sponsors’ homes. Then, it eliminated FBI criminal history checks for many sponsors.

Continue reading here.

Photo credit: https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3498/4556659182_c4981bc62d_o_d.jpg

It’s here! The Race and Social Justice Community Survey

official_seal_of_seattle The City of Seattle wants to hear from YOU! Seattle has launched its second Race and Social Justice Community Survey. The survey measures how people who live, work or go to school in Seattle think the City is doing on jobs, housing, meeting community needs and race and equity. The information collected will help guide the City’s racial equity work and determine areas for City government to prioritize through its policies and programs. The survey is anonymous and takes about 12 minutes to complete.

Take the survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/RSJCommunitysurvey 

The survey runs for three weeks from January 13th through Friday, February 5th. To ensure representation from Seattle’s diverse communities and those without access to the internet, the Seattle Office for Civil Rights is conducting targeted outreach and partnering with community organizations. The survey is also available in Spanish, Vietnamese, Korean, Amharic, Somali, Oromo and Chinese. The links to translated surveys will be available starting the week of Jan 19th at http://www.seattle.gov/rsji/community/survey.

Survey results will be shared at a community meeting in the spring of 2015. 

To learn more visit www.seattle.gov/rsji or contact Brenda Anibarro at (206) 684-4514 or email Brenda.Anibarro@Seattle.gov

Attention Law Students! Interested in Networking with the WSBA Sections? Join the WYLC and WSBA Sections in Light Appetizers and Beverages!

January 12: Social Justice Tuesday – Public Service Summer Funding

SJT

Dates: Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2016
Time: 12:30 – 1:20 PM
Location: William H. Gates Hall, RM 127

Come and learn about all of the various funding sources for summer public service employment.

January 14: Equity & Difference: Keeping the Conversation Going – What’s the Difference with “Difference”?

Equity and Difference - Keeping the Conversation Going

Dates: January 14, January 21, February 4, February 10, February 23 2016
Time: 7:30 PM
Location: Kane Hall. RM 120, 4069 Spokane Ln., Seattle, WA 98105

A series that exposes and explains transgressions and struggles—both systematic and personal—experienced by too many in our communities today, featuring thought leaders who are working to open our eyes to the consequences of prejudice, and seeking solutions for change.

January 14th Speaker: Ralina L. Joseph, Director, CCDE, associate professor, department of communication, University of Washington

Today, we often employ the word “difference” as a catch-all word when we talk about race, gender, and sexuality. Difference replaces—or rather revises—‘diversity’, ‘multiculturalism’, or a long-connected string of descriptors such as race, gender, sexuality, class, nationality, and ability. But what does this shift in language mean and why is it significant for the ways in which we assess, inhabit, and perhaps even change our world? How does the Black Lives Matter movement illustrate our need to turn to difference, just as All Lives Matter illustrates the impossibility of indifference today? Can difference, instead of diversity, provide campus activists with a means to fight microaggression and structural racism?  Join Ralina Joseph as we discuss why words matter and how identity descriptions change over time.

For more information, click here.

January 19: New Lawyer Education: Mediation Basics

WSBA Logo

Date: Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2016
Time: 8:25 AM – 3:30 PM
Location: WSBA, 1325 Fourth Ave., Suite 600, Seattle, and via live webcast

CLE Credits: Ethics: 0.50, General: 5.00

Cost: $275

Resolving matters before trial is viewed as best practice. Mediation in particular is becoming a necessary step in many legal processes. In Washington, Chapter 7.06 of the RCW mandates arbitration for certain civil cases. Superior court has mandatory arbitration rules as well. In this seminar, our esteemed faculty will walk you through the world of alternative dispute resolution, with a focus on mediation. They will cover the process of mediation, various mediation styles and models used in Washington, considerations one must take before mediating a case, drafting settlements, and the ethics of mediation. This course is designed from the lens of an attorney representing a client in a mediation proceeding. It is not geared toward those who want to become mediators – although that is discussed briefly in the first session.

For more information, click here.

January 21: Open Sections Night in Seattle

WSBA Logo

Date: Thursday, Jan. 21, 2016
Time: 5:00 – 7:00 PM
Location: WSBA Conference Center, 1325 Fourth Ave., Suite 600, Seattle, Washington

You’re invited to attend the Annual Winter Open Sections Night, sponsored by the Washington Young Lawyers Committee (WYLC) and the WSBA Sections. This popular event provides an excellent opportunity to network with young lawyers and experienced lawyers who serve as WSBA section leaders. The WSBA Sections offer a wealth of experience and resources to help new and young lawyers find their footing in a new practice area.

At this event you will:

  • Learn about the WYLC and WSBA sections
  • Have an opportunity to join a section and enter to win a drawing prize
  • Mingle with new and experienced attorneys in a fun, informal atmosphere

Light appetizers and beverages (including beer & wine) will be provided. WSBA Member funds were not used for the purchase of alcoholic beverages.

Register online here.

Interested in Volunteering for the UN? Join the Discussion with UW Law Alumna, Johanna Gusman!

December 3: A Conversation with Johanna Gusman on UN Volunteer Work

Johanna Gusman

Date: Thursday, Dec. 3, 2015
Time: 8:30 AM
Location: TBA (Please contact Professor Anita Ramasastry)

Next Thursday Johanna Gusman, a UW Law School alumna and Gates Scholar, will visit us from Cairo via a Google hangout, to discuss how to work as a UN Volunteer (which is actually a quasi paid opportunity).  This is a great way for lawyers and others to get their “foot in the door” to work with the UN on longer term contracts.  We will connect with her online at 8:30 a.m. on 12/3 — Room TBA.  For those of you who are not in Seattle or who need to listen from home, please contact Professor Anita Ramasastry as soon as possible, and she will transmit instructions for how to join us via Google.

For more information, please contact Professor Ramasastry at arama@uw.edu.

December 4: Rahul Gairola Presentation on Migrations in Absentia: Digital Advertising & Manipulation of Partition Trauma

Rahul Gairola

Date: Friday, Dec. 4, 2015
Time: 3:30 PM – 4:30 PM
Location: Seattle University, Hunthausen Hall 100

This paper contributes to existing and new scholarship in Partition and affect studies, on the one hand, and cultural and digital humanities studies, on the other, as the 70th anniversary of the geo- political division of South Asia approaches in 2017. I begin by proposing a rationale for two digital advertisements by Google and Coca Cola that attempt to capitalize on the trauma of Partition by celebrating both products as facilitating harmony between India and Pakistan. Indeed, these advertisements market “happiness” as the ultimate horizon of neoliberal experience for the subjects that they depict.

While I do not here want to undermine the nostalgic value or the raw emotions behind the subjects and sentiments portrayed, I would argue that it is crucial to question the ethical dilemmas of marketing products that utopically represent the Partition’s communal bloodshed. In particular, these advertisements promise what I call “migrations in absentia,” or the promise of movement across borders without moving from one’s geo-political space. I conclude that despite the hege-monic pull of both ads, a number of resistant representations counter their influence in the digital public sphere

Rahul Krishna Gairola is an Assistant Professor of English & Comparative Liter-ature at the Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, India. He is, with Amritjit Singh and Nalini Iyer, co-editor of a collection of essays titled Revisiting India’s Partition: Poli-tics, Memories, & Culture (Lexington Books/ Rowman & Littlefield, 2016). He is working on two additional book projects – Homelandings: Diasporic Genealogies of Belonging in Nation and Digital Homes: Electronic Agency in 21st Century South Asia. He is an Article Editor for Postcolonial Text, and Editor of salaam: the newslet-ter of the south asian literary association.

For more information, contact the English Department at 296-5420

December 10: RSJI Speaker Series Presents Kimberlé Crenshaw – Annual Human Rights Day Celebration – Black Lives Matter

RSJI Speaker Series Logo

Date: Thursday, Dec. 10, 2015
Time: 7:00 PM
Location: Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., Seattle, WA 98101

The event is free and open to the public. Tickets are not required.
Please join us for a reception starting at 6:00 pm. Light refreshments will be served.

Kimberlé Crenshaw teaches Civil Rights and other courses in critical race studies and constitutional law. Her primary scholarly interests center around race and the law, and she was a founder and has been a leader in the intellectual movement called Critical Race Theory. She was elected Professor of the Year by the 1991 and 1994 graduating classes. She now splits her time each year between UCLA and the Columbia School of Law.

At the University of Wisconsin Law School, where she received her LL.M., Professor Crenshaw was a William H. Hastie Fellow. She then clerked for Justice Shirley Abrahamson of the Wisconsin Supreme Court.

In 2007, Professor Crenshaw was awarded the Fulbright Chair for Latin America in Brazil. In 2008, she was nominated an Alphonse Fletcher Fellow. In the same year she joined the selective group of scholars awarded with an in-residence fellowship at the Center of Advanced Behavioral Studies at Stanford.

For more information, click here.

December 15: Conversations: Charlesworth and Chinkin Re-Examine the Boundaries of International Law

Hilary Charlesworth and Christine Chinkin

Date: Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2015
Time: 6:30 PM – 8:00 PM
Location: LSE Centre for Women, Peace and Security, London, UK

In 2000 ‘The Boundaries of International Law: a feminist analysis’ shone a spotlight on the status of women in human rights and international law. The authors, Hilary Charlesworth and Christine Chinkin, took a critical look at the development of international law, arguing that the absence of women had produced a narrow and inadequate jurisprudence that legitimated the unequal position of women rather than confronted it. They called for the boundaries of international law to be redrawn to create more equitable status of women in society.

15 years on, Charlesworth and Chinkin revisit their ground-breaking feminist analysis. What has been achieved, and what challenges remain?

To register, click here.

Attention Recent Grads! Employment Opportunities in the Washington Courts, Immigration Law, and Public Defense

KIND Seeking Children’s Coordinating Attorney and Pro Bono Coordinating Atorney in Seattle

KIND Logo

Kids in Need of Defense (KIND) is an innovative partnership among the Microsoft Corporation, Angelina Jolie and other interested philanthropists, law firms and corporate supporters.

KIND seeks a Children’s Coordinating Attorney to provide representation to unaccompanied immigrant children in Seattle area.

Based in KIND’s Seattle field office, the Children’s Coordinating Attorney will have the following responsibilities:

  • Provide appropriate legal orientation presentations to immigrant children at risk of deportation;
  • Complete detainee intakes following presentations;
  • Prepare and conduct pro se workshops and individual orientations to assist these children;
  • Undertake direct representation as permitted for children in their cases before the immigration court and/or review boards;
  • File all relevant paperwork and applications with government agencies, immigration court, and state courts, where applicable;
  • Recruit, train, and provide hands-on mentorship to volunteer attorneys representing unaccompanied children in immigration matters;
  • Participate in staff meetings and KIND-wide calls;
  • Assist in the supervision of law student interns and volunteers;
  • Assist with periodic trainings and presentations; and
  • Serve as an ambassador of KIND with local coalitions, courts, and agencies.

Responsibilities of the Pro Bono Coordinating Attorney include, but are not limited to, the following:

  1. Interview and screen individual child clients, some in the custody of the Office of Refugee Resettlement, and help them prepare for their immigration hearings;
  2. Match child clients with pro bono attorneys;
  3. Recruit, train, and provide hands-on mentorship to volunteer attorneys representing unaccompanied children in immigration matters and related state court matters;
  4. Develop and maintain updated guidance materials, sample filings, and legal training presentations;
  5. Foster and manage KIND relationships with law firms and corporate counsel in coordination with the Director of Pro Bono Recruitment and Training;
  6. Assist in office operations, including case management, data entry and maintenance, and reports;
  7. Participate in conferences, meetings and trainings as needed;
  8. Potentially provide direct representation to individual child clients in immigration or state court dependency proceedings; and
  9. Collaborate with KIND management in support of KIND’s mission.

For more information, click here.

American Civil Liberties Union – Capital Punishment Project Seeking Spring 2016 Legal Intern for ACLUF Capital Punishment Project

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For nearly 100 years, the ACLU has been our nation’s guardian of liberty, working in courts, legislatures, and communities to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed by the Constitution and laws of the United States.

The Capital Punishment Project (CPP) of the ACLU’s National Office in Durham, N.C. seeks applicants for its Spring 2016 Legal Internship. A stipend is available for those students who do not receive outside funding and/or course credit. Arrangements can be made with the student’s school for a work/study stipend or course credit.

The Capital Punishment Project, part of the ACLU’s Center for Justice, challenges the unfairness and arbitrariness of capital punishment while working toward the ultimate goal of abolishing the death penalty. The Project engages in public advocacy and strategic litigation, including direct representation of capital defendants. The Project’s litigation is conducted throughout the country, with a particular focus on the South.

For more information, click here.

Neighborhood Defender Service of Harlem Seeking NDS Fellow for Fall 2016, Due 11/25

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THE NEIGHBORHOOD DEFENDER SERVICE OF HARLEM (NDS) is a community-based, holistic public defender office located in Harlem.

NDS Fellows assume the responsibilities of a Staff Attorney, representing clients on misdemeanor cases. This includes appearing in court at clients’ arraignments, regular court appearances, plea negotiations, hearings, and trials. NDS Fellows interview clients and their families in the office or the local jails, conduct legal research, write motions, and compose pre-pleading and pre-sentencing memoranda. NDS Fellows spearhead and coordinate work performed by team members (investigators, social workers, team administrators).

NDS Fellows participate in a rigorous and comprehensive training program over the course of the Fellowship. This training includes significant internal training and orientation at the commencement of the Fellowship period, as well as ongoing internal and external training opportunities over the life of the Fellowship. NDS places a high priority on continuing education for staff, and the Fellows are expected to participate in our training program.

For more information, click here.

US Department of Health & Human Services Office of the General Counsel, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Division Seeking 2016 Summer Honors Legal Intern, Due 11/27

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The U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Office of the General Counsel (OGC), Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Division, is seeking motivated and enthusiastic applicants for its 2016 Summer Honors Legal Intern Program. Legal internship opportunities are available in our Washington, DC and Baltimore, MD offices.

The OGC-CMS Division recruits law students to work as interns each summer. Interns will have the opportunity to assist Division attorneys in all aspects of their work, including research, writing, and client meetings.

For more information, click here.

Attention 1Ls & 2Ls! Public Counsel Seeking Summer Interns

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Public Counsel has nine exciting law projects and several subprojects that accept summer interns. Our projects include a sophisticated appellate law practice, a comprehensive children’s rights program that handles school condition and discipline matters, special education cases, and adoptions, a community development team that supports affordable housing development and assists non-profit and small businesses with a variety of transactional needs, an immigrants’ rights group that does compelling asylum work on behalf of victims of torture and political persecution, a homelessness prevention unit that defends unlawful detainer complaints, advocates for welfare benefits, and eliminates outstanding tickets and warrants for persons at-risk of homelessness, and complex consumer fraud and impact litigation that addresses the injuries of individuals as well as systemic reform.

Public Counsel’s 2016 summer internship program will run for ten weeks, commencing on May 31, 2016, and ending on August 5, 2016. Both 1L’s and 2L’s are eligible for these internships. Applications are reviewed on a rolling basis.

Applications from 2L’s are currently being received and considered.  Applications from 1L’s will not be accepted until December 1, 2015. If you are a 1L, please wait until December 1 to transmit your application.

For more information, click here.

Interested in Working for the US Department of Justice This Summer? 

Wide Range of Practice Areas: As the nation’s largest legal employer, DOJ  offers opportunities for law students and attorneys in virtually every legal practice area. Explore the work of various DOJ organizations and find those that best match your interests and expertise.

Offices Nationwide: Several organizations have offices throughout the country, including the Antitrust Division, the Federal Bureau of Prisons, the U.S. Trustee Program, the Executive Office for Immigration Review, the Environment and Natural Resources Division, and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.  The 94 U.S. Attorneys’ Offices are organized into districts and located in every state and territory.  More information about Justice field-office locations employing attorneys is available on the DOJ Offices by State Chart.

Law Student Opportunities: Learn everything you need to know about interning or externing at the DOJ. From the Volunteer Internship Program* to the paid SLIPS Program** there’s an opportunity out there for you!

*Please note that application deadlines for the volunteer internship program varies by office.
** The summer 2016 SLIPS deadline has passed. Summer 2017 applications will open in July 2016.

Court of Appeals, Division I of Seattle Seeking Staff Attorney, Position Open Until Filled

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Staff Attorneys assist the court in resolving all types of motions and cases before the court and in handling court administrative matters as requested. Typical duties include reviewing briefs and trial court record, drafting prehearing memoranda, opinions, rulings, and orders. Knowledge and experience handling personal restraint petitions is highly desirable.

Graduation from an accredited law school AND a member in good standing in the Washington State Bar Association AND four years experience in public or private appellate practice, an appellate court, or judicially related system

For more information, click here.

Seattle University School of Law’s Center for Professional Development Hiring Associate Director

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Seattle University has an exciting, dynamic opportunity for a Associate Director to join our community.

Reporting to the Director of the Center for Professional Development(CPD), this position will counsel law students and law school alumni/ae to identify their career interests and goals, as well as to develop skills and strategies for their job searches and professional development.

This position will focus on public interest and government opportunities including the Presidential Management Fellowship Program and the law school’s Summer in D.C. Program.

For more information, click here.

Attention Attorneys with 2+ Years Experience! Nez Perce Tribe Seeking Tribal Prosecutor

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Nez Perce Tribe seeks Tribal Prosecutor to:

  • Represent the Tribe in all criminal and juvenile cases before Nez Perce Tribal Court, reviewing reports and charging cases, drafting written complaints, motions, proposed orders, legal briefs, jury instructions, sentencing recommendations, and other legal documents.
  • Work closely with the Tribal Police Department, Conservation Enforcement, Social Services, Probation, Domestic Violence Programs, and other tribal agencies in filing and prosecuting their cases in Tribal Court.
  • Supervise an office assistant, deputy prosecutor, and Child Support Enforcement attorney.

For more information, click here.

City of Seattle Seeking Race and Social Justice Initiative Manager, Position Open Until Filled

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The City of Seattle’s Race and Social Justice Manager will provide leadership and vision to ensure innovative, effective strategies to achieve racial equity in the City of Seattle.

The ideal candidate is an experienced and effective advocate for structural change, grounded in principles of racial equity and social justice; a creative thinker; and an effective collaborator, supervisor and project manager.

The RSJI Manager reports directly to the Director of the Seattle Office for Civil Rights (SOCR), which coordinates RSJI across Seattle city government. The RSJI Manager and the SOCR Director serve as the primary public faces of the Initiative, establishing and ensuring the integrity and impact of the Initiative within City government and the community. The RSJI Manager supervises 5-7 SOCR staff members who work directly on the Initiative.

For more information, click here.

What Does Health Care Look Like Beyond Our Borders? Join PhD Candidate Tanya Karwaki in a Talk on Medical Tourism!

November 20: City Council Meeting on Housing Affordability, Human Services, and Economic Resiliency Committee

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Date: Friday, Nov. 20, 2015
Time: 11:30 AM – 1:30 PM
Location: Seattle City Hall, 600 Fourth Ave., Floor L2, Boards and Commissions Room, Seattle, WA 98124

The committee will handle issues concerning affordable housing, homelessness, child care, and disability services, local and regional public health, as well as policies relating to economic development and affordability, including the minimum wage.

November 21: UW EcoReps and Husky Neighborhood Partner for Neighborhood Street Sweep

Eco Reps

Date: Saturday, Nov. 21, 2015
Time: 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Location: 17th Ave NE Meridian

Husky Neighborhood is partnering with Eco Reps at UW for the first Neighborhood Street Sweep of this academic year!  Recruit a team with your neighbors and join us help sweep the streets and collect trash around the North of 45th neighborhood!

The event is Saturday 11/21 10:00 am-noon.

Support us as we help branch out to the community by creating a safer and cleaner neighborhood!  We will provide groups with maps and equipment at sign-in at the 17th Ave Median.

For more information, click here.

November 21: Microsoft Presents the National Association of Law Students with Disabilities 2015 Annual Conference

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Date: Saturday, Nov. 21, 2015
Time: 9:00 AM – 6:00 PM
Location: University of Maryland, Baltimore, SMC Campus Center, RM 208, 621 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, MD 21201

Come join disability rights experts, policy makers, career counselors, and attorneys with disabilities as we celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act! Featuring panels on topics such as bar exam & LSAT accommodations, employment and disability disclosure, disability barriers to the legal profession, mentorship & networking, and career opportunities in the private & public sectors. Breakfast and lunch provided!

For more information and registration, click here.

November 23: Global Mondays – “Health Care Beyond Our Borders:  Medical Tourism” by Tanya Karwaki, Ph.D. Candidate, UW Law

Global Mondays

Date: Monday, Nov. 23, 2015
Time: 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
Location: William H. Gates Hall, RM 117

Patients are part of increased globalization. If domestic health care services are less attractive then foreign services, patients with passports may be willing to cross international borders and travel long distances to their health care providers. Such patients choosing to travel internationally for health care services are often called medical tourists in the medico-legal literature.  While reliable data on the numbers of medical tourists are not yet available, medical tourism appears to be an emerging phenomenon.  In the United States, some self-funded employers are incentivizing their employees to participate in international medical tourism.

This presentation provides an overview of outbound medical tourism and domestic state legislation.  It also presents questions about the future of medical tourism and the potential public policy challenges.

For more information, click here.

November 24: Immigrant Families Advocacy Project Presents “Solidarity with Syrian Refugees”

Date: Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015
Time: 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
Location: William H. Gates Hall, RM 127, Reception afterwards in RM 115

Solidarity with Syrian Refugees Event Flyer

December 1: Tech Policy Lab Distinguished Lecture: How Technology Impacts Humans

Event Flyer

Date: Tuesday, Dec. 1, 2015
Time: 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Location: Kane Hall, RM 110

Technology designers are new policy makers. No one elected them and most people do not know their names, but the arbitrary decisions they make when producing the latest gadgets and online innovations dictate the code by which we conduct our daily lives and govern our country. As technology progresses, every democratic value and every law comes up for grabs and will likely be redefined by what technology enables or not. Privacy and security were just the first wave. In this talk, let’s see how it all fits together or falls apart.

As a professor at Harvard University, Latanya Sweeney creates and uses technology to assess and solve societal, political and governance problems, and teaches others how to do the same. One focus area is the scientific study of technology’s impact on humankind, and she is the Editor-in-Chief of the newly formed journal Technology Science. She was formerly the Chief Technology Officer at the Federal Trade Commission, an elected fellow of the American College of Medical Informatics, with almost 100 academic publications, 3 patents, explicit citations in 2 government regulations, and founded 3 company spin-offs. She has received numerous professional and academic awards, and testified before federal and international government bodies.  Professor Sweeney earned her PhD in computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, being the first black woman to do so. Her undergraduate degree in computer science was completed at Harvard University.

For more information, click here.