Upcoming: Symposium on Legal Financial Obligations

June 6: LFOs: Beyond Defining the Problem; Advancing Solutions

The Washington State Minority & Justice Commission is proud to share the final flyer and program agenda for its upcoming Symposium, Legal Financial Obligations (LFOs): Beyond Defining the Problem; Advancing Solutionson June 6, 2018, at Seattle University School of Law (901 12th Ave. Seattle, WA 98122). The Symposium will be held in conjunction with “Exploring Policy Implementation and Alternatives,” a conference organized by the University of Washington Department of Sociology that will take place immediately after the Symposium at Seattle University School of Law. Please see below and attached. Feel free to share this email with your networks. These events are FREE and open to the public. Please RSVP HERE by May 31. Space is limited.

It’s not too late to get summer funding

Due June 9: Interested in litigation? Apply for Dwyer Inn of Court

Application Deadline: Friday, June 9, 2017

Rising 3L students with an interest in litigation—particularly litigation in the Seattle-area state and federal courts—are encouraged to apply for membership in the 2017-2018 William L. Dwyer Inn of Court. The Inn is a cooperative venture between the King County Bar, Seattle University School of Law, and the University of Washington School of Law. On the second Tuesday of each month, members of the Inn meet in the evening to discuss litigation practice, have dinner together, and learn about a topic of general legal interest. The meetings generally run between 5:30pm to 8:00pm at Seattle University.

Read more and apply here.

Upcoming: Reproductive health events discussing FGM, Trump’s policies

Feb. 13, Global Mondays: Culture and Politics in Gambia – From Efforts to Stop Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) to the Current Political Turmoil

global1Time: 12:30 to 1:20 p.m.
Date: Monday, Feb. 13, 2017
Place: UW School of Law, Room 117

Isatou Jallow was born and raised in Gambia, West Africa. She moved to Seattle in 2012 as an asylee. She has a degree in Law and Political Science from Universite Mohamed V in Morocco, where she lived for five years. Isatou is an advocate for women’s rights and advocates for the complete eradication of the practice of female genital mutilation (FGM). She was able to save her sister and cousin from FGM, and today FGM is no longer practiced in her family. Isatou works to convince immigrants living in the U.S. not to send their daughters home for FGM. Isatou has taken a position as a Commissioner on the City of Seattle’s Immigrant and Refugee Commission and has volunteered with several organizations. She is often invited to present about FGM and refugee access to health care. Read more here.

Feb. 15: Reproductive Health and Access to Care

UW Law LogoTime: 4:30 to 6:00 p.m.
Date: Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2017
Place: UW School of Law, Room 133 (please note the flyer says Room 138, but 133 is the correct room)

The new Congress and Trump administration are committed to altering the federal government’s posture with respect to federal funding and policy relating to reproductive health and rights. This panel will consider the challenges and disparities that currently exist, the new threats on the horizon and the advocacy efforts at the state, national and global levels aimed at preserving and improving access to reproductive health services. Read the flyer here.

Feb. 24: The Money Barrier: 1st Annual Low Bono Law Conference

WSBA LogoTime: 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Date: Friday, Feb. 24, 2017
Place: Webcast and Seattle School of Law, Sullivan Hall, Room C5, 901 12th Ave., Seattle, WA 98122

Many people are “priced out” of the justice system, with incomes too high to qualify for legal aid, but too low to afford an attorney.  Join us to learn more about how lawyers are working to close the justice gap for this under-served population:http://law.seattleu.edu/continuing-legal-education/upcoming-programs/1st-annual-low-bono-conference

Lawyers from all practice areas and all firm sizes are welcome. LLLTs, law students, and non-lawyers are encouraged to join us as well. Read more and register here.

Save the Date, April 19: Brew Review, Unemployment Law Project benefit

brew-reviewTime: 5:00 to 8:00 p.m.
Date: Wednesday, April 19, 2017
Place: AXIS Pioneer Square, 308 1st Ave. S, Seattle, WA 98104

Join us for an evening of Northwest Brews! Sample local beers and ciders while enjoying appetizers. Listen to live music while you bid on silent auction items. Talk with great people about social justice! All this to benefit the Unemployment Law Project, a non profit law firm providing free legal counsel to help individuals gain unemployment benefits as they search for new jobs.

Tickets are $30 in advance and $35 at the door. Tickets include seven 4oz tastes, appetizers, and live music. You must be 21 to attend. Contact events@ulproject.org for more details. Buy tickets and learn more here.

Attention Recent Grads! Employment Opportunities in the Washington Courts, Immigration Law, and Public Defense

KIND Seeking Children’s Coordinating Attorney and Pro Bono Coordinating Atorney in Seattle

KIND Logo

Kids in Need of Defense (KIND) is an innovative partnership among the Microsoft Corporation, Angelina Jolie and other interested philanthropists, law firms and corporate supporters.

KIND seeks a Children’s Coordinating Attorney to provide representation to unaccompanied immigrant children in Seattle area.

Based in KIND’s Seattle field office, the Children’s Coordinating Attorney will have the following responsibilities:

  • Provide appropriate legal orientation presentations to immigrant children at risk of deportation;
  • Complete detainee intakes following presentations;
  • Prepare and conduct pro se workshops and individual orientations to assist these children;
  • Undertake direct representation as permitted for children in their cases before the immigration court and/or review boards;
  • File all relevant paperwork and applications with government agencies, immigration court, and state courts, where applicable;
  • Recruit, train, and provide hands-on mentorship to volunteer attorneys representing unaccompanied children in immigration matters;
  • Participate in staff meetings and KIND-wide calls;
  • Assist in the supervision of law student interns and volunteers;
  • Assist with periodic trainings and presentations; and
  • Serve as an ambassador of KIND with local coalitions, courts, and agencies.

Responsibilities of the Pro Bono Coordinating Attorney include, but are not limited to, the following:

  1. Interview and screen individual child clients, some in the custody of the Office of Refugee Resettlement, and help them prepare for their immigration hearings;
  2. Match child clients with pro bono attorneys;
  3. Recruit, train, and provide hands-on mentorship to volunteer attorneys representing unaccompanied children in immigration matters and related state court matters;
  4. Develop and maintain updated guidance materials, sample filings, and legal training presentations;
  5. Foster and manage KIND relationships with law firms and corporate counsel in coordination with the Director of Pro Bono Recruitment and Training;
  6. Assist in office operations, including case management, data entry and maintenance, and reports;
  7. Participate in conferences, meetings and trainings as needed;
  8. Potentially provide direct representation to individual child clients in immigration or state court dependency proceedings; and
  9. Collaborate with KIND management in support of KIND’s mission.

For more information, click here.

American Civil Liberties Union – Capital Punishment Project Seeking Spring 2016 Legal Intern for ACLUF Capital Punishment Project

ACLU Logo

For nearly 100 years, the ACLU has been our nation’s guardian of liberty, working in courts, legislatures, and communities to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed by the Constitution and laws of the United States.

The Capital Punishment Project (CPP) of the ACLU’s National Office in Durham, N.C. seeks applicants for its Spring 2016 Legal Internship. A stipend is available for those students who do not receive outside funding and/or course credit. Arrangements can be made with the student’s school for a work/study stipend or course credit.

The Capital Punishment Project, part of the ACLU’s Center for Justice, challenges the unfairness and arbitrariness of capital punishment while working toward the ultimate goal of abolishing the death penalty. The Project engages in public advocacy and strategic litigation, including direct representation of capital defendants. The Project’s litigation is conducted throughout the country, with a particular focus on the South.

For more information, click here.

Neighborhood Defender Service of Harlem Seeking NDS Fellow for Fall 2016, Due 11/25

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THE NEIGHBORHOOD DEFENDER SERVICE OF HARLEM (NDS) is a community-based, holistic public defender office located in Harlem.

NDS Fellows assume the responsibilities of a Staff Attorney, representing clients on misdemeanor cases. This includes appearing in court at clients’ arraignments, regular court appearances, plea negotiations, hearings, and trials. NDS Fellows interview clients and their families in the office or the local jails, conduct legal research, write motions, and compose pre-pleading and pre-sentencing memoranda. NDS Fellows spearhead and coordinate work performed by team members (investigators, social workers, team administrators).

NDS Fellows participate in a rigorous and comprehensive training program over the course of the Fellowship. This training includes significant internal training and orientation at the commencement of the Fellowship period, as well as ongoing internal and external training opportunities over the life of the Fellowship. NDS places a high priority on continuing education for staff, and the Fellows are expected to participate in our training program.

For more information, click here.

US Department of Health & Human Services Office of the General Counsel, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Division Seeking 2016 Summer Honors Legal Intern, Due 11/27

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The U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Office of the General Counsel (OGC), Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Division, is seeking motivated and enthusiastic applicants for its 2016 Summer Honors Legal Intern Program. Legal internship opportunities are available in our Washington, DC and Baltimore, MD offices.

The OGC-CMS Division recruits law students to work as interns each summer. Interns will have the opportunity to assist Division attorneys in all aspects of their work, including research, writing, and client meetings.

For more information, click here.

Attention 1Ls & 2Ls! Public Counsel Seeking Summer Interns

Public Counsel Logo

Public Counsel has nine exciting law projects and several subprojects that accept summer interns. Our projects include a sophisticated appellate law practice, a comprehensive children’s rights program that handles school condition and discipline matters, special education cases, and adoptions, a community development team that supports affordable housing development and assists non-profit and small businesses with a variety of transactional needs, an immigrants’ rights group that does compelling asylum work on behalf of victims of torture and political persecution, a homelessness prevention unit that defends unlawful detainer complaints, advocates for welfare benefits, and eliminates outstanding tickets and warrants for persons at-risk of homelessness, and complex consumer fraud and impact litigation that addresses the injuries of individuals as well as systemic reform.

Public Counsel’s 2016 summer internship program will run for ten weeks, commencing on May 31, 2016, and ending on August 5, 2016. Both 1L’s and 2L’s are eligible for these internships. Applications are reviewed on a rolling basis.

Applications from 2L’s are currently being received and considered.  Applications from 1L’s will not be accepted until December 1, 2015. If you are a 1L, please wait until December 1 to transmit your application.

For more information, click here.

Interested in Working for the US Department of Justice This Summer? 

Wide Range of Practice Areas: As the nation’s largest legal employer, DOJ  offers opportunities for law students and attorneys in virtually every legal practice area. Explore the work of various DOJ organizations and find those that best match your interests and expertise.

Offices Nationwide: Several organizations have offices throughout the country, including the Antitrust Division, the Federal Bureau of Prisons, the U.S. Trustee Program, the Executive Office for Immigration Review, the Environment and Natural Resources Division, and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.  The 94 U.S. Attorneys’ Offices are organized into districts and located in every state and territory.  More information about Justice field-office locations employing attorneys is available on the DOJ Offices by State Chart.

Law Student Opportunities: Learn everything you need to know about interning or externing at the DOJ. From the Volunteer Internship Program* to the paid SLIPS Program** there’s an opportunity out there for you!

*Please note that application deadlines for the volunteer internship program varies by office.
** The summer 2016 SLIPS deadline has passed. Summer 2017 applications will open in July 2016.

Court of Appeals, Division I of Seattle Seeking Staff Attorney, Position Open Until Filled

Washington Courts Logo

Staff Attorneys assist the court in resolving all types of motions and cases before the court and in handling court administrative matters as requested. Typical duties include reviewing briefs and trial court record, drafting prehearing memoranda, opinions, rulings, and orders. Knowledge and experience handling personal restraint petitions is highly desirable.

Graduation from an accredited law school AND a member in good standing in the Washington State Bar Association AND four years experience in public or private appellate practice, an appellate court, or judicially related system

For more information, click here.

Seattle University School of Law’s Center for Professional Development Hiring Associate Director

SU Law Logo

Seattle University has an exciting, dynamic opportunity for a Associate Director to join our community.

Reporting to the Director of the Center for Professional Development(CPD), this position will counsel law students and law school alumni/ae to identify their career interests and goals, as well as to develop skills and strategies for their job searches and professional development.

This position will focus on public interest and government opportunities including the Presidential Management Fellowship Program and the law school’s Summer in D.C. Program.

For more information, click here.

Attention Attorneys with 2+ Years Experience! Nez Perce Tribe Seeking Tribal Prosecutor

Nez Perce Tribe Logo

Nez Perce Tribe seeks Tribal Prosecutor to:

  • Represent the Tribe in all criminal and juvenile cases before Nez Perce Tribal Court, reviewing reports and charging cases, drafting written complaints, motions, proposed orders, legal briefs, jury instructions, sentencing recommendations, and other legal documents.
  • Work closely with the Tribal Police Department, Conservation Enforcement, Social Services, Probation, Domestic Violence Programs, and other tribal agencies in filing and prosecuting their cases in Tribal Court.
  • Supervise an office assistant, deputy prosecutor, and Child Support Enforcement attorney.

For more information, click here.

City of Seattle Seeking Race and Social Justice Initiative Manager, Position Open Until Filled

City of Seattle Logo

The City of Seattle’s Race and Social Justice Manager will provide leadership and vision to ensure innovative, effective strategies to achieve racial equity in the City of Seattle.

The ideal candidate is an experienced and effective advocate for structural change, grounded in principles of racial equity and social justice; a creative thinker; and an effective collaborator, supervisor and project manager.

The RSJI Manager reports directly to the Director of the Seattle Office for Civil Rights (SOCR), which coordinates RSJI across Seattle city government. The RSJI Manager and the SOCR Director serve as the primary public faces of the Initiative, establishing and ensuring the integrity and impact of the Initiative within City government and the community. The RSJI Manager supervises 5-7 SOCR staff members who work directly on the Initiative.

For more information, click here.

Interested in Getting Some Experience at a Foreign Firm? Check Out the Brigard & Urrutia Summer Internship

Center for Economic and Social Rights (CESR) Seeking Graduate-Level Research Intern for Spring 2015

Center for Economic and Social Rights

Interns contribute substantively to the Center’s work in one or more of program areas. In particular, interns carry out research that analyzes trends in global policy. They also contribute to the Center’s research documenting deprivations of economic and social rights in specific country contexts; this interdisciplinary research deploys social science and statistical methods alongside traditional techniques of human rights reporting, such as legal analysis and narrative testimony. Interns are also involved in preparing reports and other advocacy materials based on the findings of such research, to present to relevant institutions at the national, regional and United Nations level. As a small NGO, the Center has established robust partnerships with national, regional and international organizations that allow for mutual exchange of expertise. Interns may also interact with our partners, including by attending meetings and workshops, preparing or delivering presentations, authoring blogs posts and opinion pieces, etc.

For more information, click here.

ACLU Seeking 2015 Summer Law Clerk in Washington DC

ACLU Logo

The ACLU of the Nation’s Capital is the Washington, D.C. affiliate of the American Civil Liberties Union, a national nonprofit organization devoted to the protection of civil liberties and civil rights. Founded in 1961, the ACLU of the Nation’s Capital is one of the District’s premier public advocacy organizations, focusing exclusively on issues that arise within the District of Columbia in areas such as police practices reform, racial justice, freedom of speech and religion, LGBT rights, gender equality and prisoner rights. We advance civil liberties through litigation, legislation and public education.

The summer law clerks at the ACLU of the Nation’s Capital gain a comprehensive, hands-on introduction to the legal work of one of the nation’s major advocacy organizations. Virtually all work involves civil liberties and constitutional law.

When possible, law clerks attend trial or appellate proceedings involving staff or volunteer attorneys, as well as depositions and legislative hearings. Law clerks are also encouraged to take part in the many programs for summer interns in Washington, D.C.

For more information, click here.

Family Equality Council Seeking Law Fellow

FEC Logo

Family Equality Council connects, supports, and represents the one million parents in America who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender, and the two million children that they are raising. Over the past 30 years we have built an approach that strengthens families in three ways: building our community to support parents and children; sharing our stories to open hearts and minds; and raising our voices to create social justice for all families.

FEC is seeking legal interns for both Spring and Summer 2015 in their Washington, DC office. Interns will work with onsite legal staff to pursue legislative, regulatory, and policy goals as advocates for LGBTQ parents and families. Legal interns will have the opportunity to learn about legislative and regulatory drafting, law and policy affecting LGBTQ families, and the legislative process.

All interns will work in FEC’s Washington, DC office. Spring interns are expected to make a commitment of at least twelve hours a week. Summer interns are expected to make a commitment of 35 hours a week for at least 10 weeks.

Legal interns will have a range of day to day responsibilities including drafting advocacy memoranda, direct advocacy with agencies and congressional offices, contributing to social justice coalition meetings, and other legal research and writing projects.

For more information, click here.

Associate Director, Center for Professional Development at the Seattle University School of Law

SU Law Logo

Seattle University has an exciting, dynamic opportunity for an Associate Director, Center for Professional Development to join our community.

Reporting to the Director of the Center for Professional Development, this position will counsel and coach law school students and alumni/ae to identify their career interests and goals. Develop skills and strategies for their job searches and professional development.

Seattle University School of Law educates ethical lawyers who distinguish themselves through their outstanding professional skills and their dedication to law in the service of justice. Faculty, students and staff form a vibrant, diverse, and collaborative community that promotes leadership for a just and humane world. The Law School’s commitment to academic distinction is grounded in its Jesuit Catholic tradition, one that encourages open inquiry, thoughtful reflection and concern for personal growth. Innovation creativity and technological sophistication characterize our rigorous educational program, which prepares lawyers for a wide range of successful and rewarding careers in law, business and public service.

For more information, click here.

Attention Rising 1Ls and 2Ls! Deborah T. Poritz Summer Public Interest Legal Fellowship Offers Paid Internships

LSNJ

The Deborah T. Poritz Summer Public Interest Legal Fellowship program awards paid summer internships to rising 1L and 2L law students at New Jersey public interest legal organizations. This program is available to those who seek a paid fellowship, as well to those who would like to pursue an opportunity for public interest work, but have other funding available to them. Applications will be considered and hiring decisions will be made on a continuing basis until all positions are filled (usually by mid-April). Interested students are strongly encouraged to apply as early as possible. The program particularly seeks people who have demonstrated their commitment to helping the disadvantaged through their prior work, extracurricular activities during school and volunteer efforts, and give evidence of strong commitment to a public interest career. Grades, honors and personal achievements are also important.

For more information, click here.  To apply, click here.

International Bar Association Offering Legal Internship Programs

IBA Logo

Intern positions are available for undergraduate law students, postgraduate law students, and newly qualified lawyers at the International Bar Association’s offices in London and Washington DC.

Established by the IBA in 1995, the International Bar Association’s Human Rights Institute (IBAHRI) works with the global legal community to promote and protect human rights and the independence of the legal profession worldwide.

Our core activities include: human rights training and technical assistance for legal practitioners and institutions; international fact-finding, delivering  timely and reliable information on human rights and the legal profession; and supporting lawyers and judges who are arbitrarily harassed, intimidated or arrested through advocacy and trial monitoring. A focus on pertinent human rights issues, including the abolition of the death penalty, poverty, and sexual orientation forms the basis of targeted capacity building and advocacy projects.

For more information, click here.

Attention Recent Grads! Associate Attorney Position Open at EarthJustice in Seattle

EarthJustice Logo

Earthjustice is seeking applicants for an associate attorney to begin work in the Fall of 2015 or sooner.  The Northwest Office opened in 1987 to enable Earthjustice to take a more active role in preserving the unique natural resources and environment of the Pacific Northwest.

Since that time, the Northwest office has undertaken campaigns to protect old growth forests, promote salmon recovery, improve water quality, protect Puget Sound and the communities that depend on it, stop coal-fired power plants, protect farmworkers and their families from pesticides, and respond to climate change, among other things.

Although the primary focus of the Northwest office is representing environmental and citizens’ groups in Washington, Oregon, and Idaho, we often take cases with national and international scope. For example, the Northwest office is involved in cases seeking to stop coal exports to Asia and transport of crude oil to ports along the entire west coast as part of its effort to reduce reliance on dirty fossil fuels.. We also have led nationwide litigation to protect 58.5 million acres of undeveloped, roadless areas on our National Forests. We frequently work in close partnership with Native American Tribes and fence-line communities.

Our office is located in the heart of downtown Seattle near the federal and state courthouses, the waterfront, and historic Pioneer Square. Our goal is to produce the highest quality legal work in a diverse, inclusive, supportive, and collegial environment. The Northwest Office has nine attorneys, including this position.

For more information, click here.

Brigard & Urrutia Seeking Intern for Summer 2015

Brigard  Urrutia Logo

We are pleased to announce the Brigard & Urrutia/Brigard & Castro Summer Internship Program (the “Program”).  Our Program is directed to students who are currently pursuing a legal education in foreign law schools and, as such, have obtained outstanding academic results.

The Program is designed to afford students the opportunity to spend 6 weeks of their summer vacation at Brigard & Urrutia/Briggard & Castro, the leading full service law firm in Colombia.  During the Program, students will have the occasion of experiencing work at a Latin American law firm, may rotate among our different legal practice groups, participate in our training activities and be in contact with life in Bogota, a vibrant city with a rich cultural life.

For more information, click here.

Davis, Cowell & Bowe, LLP Seeking Law Clerk in San Francisco, CA

Davis Cowell and Bowe LLP

Davis, Cowell & Bowe, LLP in San Francisco is seeking summer law clerks for its San Francisco office.  We represent unions and workers in a wide-ranging practice, both in terms of geography and subjects.  We have a heavy emphasis on organizing, including representing UNITE HERE throughout the United States in all of its hotel and gaming organizing campaigns.  We also represent local unions from Boston to Orlando to San Diego to Seattle to Honolulu, and in between, in addition to many in California and Nevada.  Our clients include international and local unions representing hotel workers, grocery workers, firefighters, construction workers, doctors, dentists, and others.  We have expanded far beyond traditional labor and employee benefits law in our work for unions, to include First Amendment, corporations and securities, consumer, environmental, election, immigration, antitrust and other areas of the law.  We have pioneered the use of card-check neutrality agreements to organize and have negotiated, and continue to negotiate, hundreds of these organizing agreements.  We also represent plaintiffs in employment class actions.

For more information, click here.

Global Rights Compliance Seeking Business and Human Rights Intern

Global Rights Compliance Logo

Global Rights Compliance is an international group of lawyers specializing in human rights issues. It is led by Wayne Jordash QC, a British barrister, and Scott Martin, an American lawyer.

Global Rights Compliance is seeking motivated and hard-working interns to join an international team that works on matters relating to business and human rights, international humanitarian law, international criminal law and international trade and development.

The internship is remote, which means that the intern can be home-based.

For more information, click here.

Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) Seeking Legal Volunteer Intern at the Office of General Counsel, Spring 2015

CFR Logo

Founded in 1921, the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) is a leading nonprofit membership organization, research center, and publisher, with headquarters in New York, an office in Washington, DC, and programs nationwide. It is dedicated to increasing America’s understanding of the world and contributing ideas to U.S. foreign policy. CFR’s 4,700+ members are leaders in international affairs and foreign policy.

CFR’s volunteer internship in the Office of the General Counsel provides a volunteer intern the opportunity to receive legal training, as well as skills training in areas such as legal writing, research, and client management. This position does not involve areas of international law, but rather issues facing domestic not-for-profit corporations. The position reports to the CFR General Counsel.

For more information, click here.

Do You Enjoy Free Film Screenings? Check Out These Amazing Films!

April 21: Special Free Screening of “Documented” in Seattle

Monday, Apr. 21, 2014
6:30 PM, Siff Uptown Cinema, 511 Queen Anne Avenue North, Seattle, WA
Q&A with Jose Antonio Vargas and Eric Liu after the film

Tickets are FREE, but please RSVP online here.

In 2011, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas outed himself as an undocumented immigrant in the New York Times Magazine. DOCUMENTED chronicles his journey to America from the Philippines as a child; his public struggle as an immigration reform activist/provocateur; and his journey inward as he reconnects with his mother, whom he hasn’t seen in 20 years. A broken immigration system leads to broken families and broken lives. 

Click here for more information.

April 22: Social Justice Tuesday- American Indian Children and Families:  Understanding the History and Experiences that Inform Native People’s Interactions with U.S. Legal Systems

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12:30-1:20, Room 133

Speaker:  Dian Million, Ph.D.  Associate Professor of American Indian Studies at the University of Washington.

Hosted by: The Incarcerated Mothers Advocacy Project

Description:  Dr. Million (Tanana Athabascan) is a poet, professor and scholar. Her research explores the politics of knowledge, colonialism, human rights and healing.  By placing community health in the context of race, class, gender and identity issues, Dr. Million shares perspectives on Native family life that will enhance cultural competency, challenge assumptions, and illuminate the connections among social and political conditions.  Her insights into the tensions between Native sovereignty and American governing practices are relevant to lawyers and law students working with tribes, government policy, family or criminal law, as well as anyone who is interested in a more complex and honest view of U.S. history.

Please RSVP to gatespsl@uw.edu by 12 noon on Monday, April 21 if you’d like lunch.

April 23: Webinar on Using Human Rights to Advance Racial Justice: An Introduction to the Race Treaty

humanrights

Wednesday, Apr. 23, 2014
2:00 – 3:30 PM EDT

Join the U.S. Human Rights Network’s CERD Taskforce for an introductory webinar on the “Race Treaty,” also known as the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (CERD), and the upcoming review of the U.S. Government by the U.N. CERD Committee (PRRAC is a member of the USHRN CERD Task Force).  The webinar is scheduled for Wednesday, April 23, 2014, 2:00-3:30 pm EDT.

Click here to register.

April 23: An Evening with Rwanda: “Finding Hillywood” Film Screening & More

Finding Hillywood Poster

Wednesday, Apr. 23, 2014
6:30 – 9:00 PM
Ethnic Cultural Center Theater (3940 Brooklyn Ave NE)
Admission: Free

Join us for an inspiring and informative film event and discussion to explore Rwanda’s history of transitional justice and healing since the 1994 genocide.

The program includes:

Transitional Justice in Rwanda: A short film by Rwandan youth about transitional justice in Rwanda, and a few video clips from interviews with personnel from the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. (www.tribunalvoices.org)

Finding Hillywood: A one-hour feature documentary about the beginning of Rwanda’s film industry, and a real life example of how art heals. (http://findinghillywood.com)

Discussion: A conversation with Leah Warshawski, Director of Finding Hillywood

For more information, click here.

April 24: Webinar on Next Steps in Bringing Home the Human Right to Housing: Scholarship from the Symposium on the Human Right to Housing

national law center housing

Webinar 12:00 – 1:00 PST

To celebrate the release of a special edition of the Columbia Law School Human Rights Law Review with articles curated for last April’s Bringing Economic & Social Rights Home: The Right to Adequate Housing in the U.S. symposium, the National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty, the Columbia Law School Human Rights Institute, the Columbia Law School Human Rights Law Review, and the Northeastern University School of Law Program on Human Rights and the Global Economy will be hosting a webinar on April 24, 2014, at 3pm Eastern, 2pm Central, 1 Mountain, 12 noon Pacific.  

The articles in this special issue of the Human Rights Law Review provide an important complement to, and expansion of, the last year’s symposium discussion, and the webinar will offer a chance to hear the authors summarize their contributions and answer questions. 

Speakers include: 

  • Maria Foscarinis, Executive Director, National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty, NLCHP
  • Eric Tars, Director of Human Rights & Children’s Rights Programs, NLCHP
  • Heather Maria Johnson, Staff Attorney, ACLU of Southern California
  • Tristia Bauman, Senior Counsel, NLCHP
  • Risa Kaufman, Executive Director, Human Rights Institute, Columbia Law School
  • Heidi Wegleitner Staff Attorney, Legal Aid of Wisconsin; District 2 Supervisor, Dane County Board of Supervisors
  • Lucy Williams, Professor of Law & Faculty Co-Director, Program on Human Rights and the Global Economy, Northeastern Law School
  • Brittany Scott, Campaign Coordinator, National Economic & Social Rights Initiative

Come and get a taste of the new thoughts, and ask questions of the authors!  Click here to register.

April 25: Washington State Society of Healthcare Attorneys Presents Its Annual Hospital & Health Seminar

(c) University of Kansas - Medical Legal Partnership

Friday, Apr. 25, 2014
Seattle University School of Law, Sullivan Hall

The Washington State Society of Healthcare Attorneys (“WSSHA”) was founded in 1973. It is operated exclusively for educational and charitable purposes, to provide an opportunity for legal advisors in the health field to meet and exchange information and ideas, to conduct legal seminars of interest to such attorneys, and to provide a central agency for the exchange of information of a legal nature in the health field.

This is a great networking and learning opportunity.  The registration fee for students is $115.  If you want to attend, you should send in your check as soon as possible along with the form that you can print off of the website. This seminar is well attended by the healthcare attorneys of Seattle and a few from Spokane and Oregon so it’s a great chance to connect with attorneys who practice in the health law field.

Click here to view the brochure.  The registration form is on the brochure itself.

April 28: National Commission on Voting Rights Event at the UW Law School

Nat'l Commission on Voting Rights

Monday, Apr. 28, 2014
4:30 – 7:30 PM, RM 138

In 2005, the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, on behalf of the civil rights community, convened and staffed the National Commission on the Voting Rights Act (NCVRA), an eight-member blue ribbon panel which produced a fact-based report: Protecting Minority Voters: the Voting Rights Act at Work 1982 – 2005.

The Lawyers’ Committee, in close collaboration with state and local organizations, will organize the 2013-14 hearings.  The Commission will conduct fact finding hearings across the country that will look closely at the record of discrimination, election administration problems, voter registration procedures, and other challenges that voters are facing.

The Lawyers’ Committee will reach out to our partners in each of the states to work with the Commission in organizing the hearings. In addition to National Commissioners, we will invite local leaders to serve as guest commissioners. Voting attorneys, grassroots leaders, social scientists, and the public will be invited to testify. The hearing will be organized with Commissioners as questioners and panels of witnesses providing testimony. Each witness will be asked to submit a written statement (with the length at the discretion of each witness) in advance of the hearing.  During the hearing, witnesses will give oral testimony based on their written statement.  Commissioners sitting on the panel will ask questions on specific issues relating to each witnesses oral and written testimony. The hearings will also include periodic open sessions for audience members and voters to speak about their voting experience. Hearings will be held from November 2013 to spring 2014.

RSVP online here.

April 30: Dr. Bernard LaFayette “Sit-ins, Freedom Rides, and Selma: What the Civil Rights Movement and Nonviolence Tell Us Today

Dr. Lafayette & MLK

Wednesday, Apr. 30, 2014
10:00 AM
School of Social Work Building, 4101 15th Ave. NE, RM 305

In 1958, 18-year-old Bernard LaFayette enrolled at American Baptist Theological Seminary in Nashville, Tennessee. LaFayette is an African American and had lived in Florida and Pennsylvania: in the former, he was raised with segregation, in the latter, he attended integrated public schools. When he arrived at seminary, he roomed with John Lewis, now the U.S. Representative for Georgia’s 5th congressional district. Within weeks, Lewis convinced LaFayette to dive into the practice of nonviolence, and they would go on to participate in some of the most crucial moments in the U.S. Civil Rights Movement.

In this talk, Dr. LaFayette, having earned his Ph.D. from Harvard University, will speak about his experiences in the Civil Rights Movement, the theory and practice of nonviolence, and our responsibilities today — all with a boundless optimism and perhaps a song or two.

For more information, click here.

May 10: Presentation on Race & Jury Service: Is Jury Selection Fair?  Are All Communities Represented?

Franklin County Voter Registration Map

Saturday, May 10, 2014
4:30 PM, Gates Hall RM 119

Co-sponsors: Northwest Justice Project, Whitman College, Center for Public Service Law-UW Law

Interested in the issue of minority jury representation?

On Saturday May 10th, at 4:30 pm at the University of Washington Law School, students from Whitman College’s State of the State of Latinos in Washington will be presenting their project analyzing the jury selection system in Eastern Washington. In addition, attorneys from Washington Appleseed and the Northwest Justice Project will present the work they are doing to better understand jury selection and the role that academic researchers, attorneys, and students can play in increasing minority jury participation. The location will be in Room 119 in Gates Hall, light snacks and refreshments will be provided. Please feel free to contact David Morales at the Northwest Justice Project, if you have any further questions.