Take a trip to California or find a new way to use that J.D. with these exciting opportunities!

AmeriCorps JD is now accepting applicants! 

We will accept applications through April 15, 2015 from students, who not only work in the priority areas defined below, but who provide service to low-income communities in other areas of law. The 300 service hours required to earn the education award can be completed anytime from when the application is accepted and the background check has been initiated through August 31, 2015.

PRIORITY AREAS: Priority will be given to applications from students who are serving veterans, military families or victims of disasters, or focusing on removing barriers to employment or housing. However, we also have many spots available for students working with other populations and in other areas of law.

Some more examples of the type of work students can do within these priority areas include:

  • Direct legal services: intake, legal form preparation, performing client and witness interviews, advocating for clients by telephone and in person, attending hearings, assisting attorneys in legal representation, carrying out legal research and writing
  • Outreach and education: developing and distributing fact sheets, developing and delivering training on legal topics or on how to access legal services, ensuring potential clients are aware of their rights and available services
  • Capacity building: activities which build the capacity of your host organization or other organizations to provide services in the previously specified priority areas, such as an organizational assessment, compiling best practices, organizing focus groups, leading planning committees

You can also learn more about organizations and the legal services being provided for veterans, disaster, and employment issues by viewing our Fellow profiles on our website.

The AmeriCorps program, under the Corporation for National and Community Service, has a list of prohibited activities that cannot be included in the hours of service completed to earn the Segal AmeriCorps Education Award. A list of these activities can be found here.

Students serving in the priority areas or other issue areas may apply now through Wednesday, April 15, 2015. Visit our website for more information about the application process. Questions may be directed to AmeriCorpsJD@equaljusticeworks.org.

UW Law Students: Re-ignite your Social Justice Heart and Vision at the Annual Trina Grillo Retreat in Sunny Santa Clara, CA!

The Trina Grillo Retreat at Santa Clara Law (March 20-21, 2015) provides a unique opportunity for public interest and social-justice oriented law students, faculty, and practitioners to forge an alliance by exchanging viewpoints, exploring career opportunities, and formulating strategies for social justice.

Join with law students from several west coast law schools to re-imagine the next generation of social justice lawyering.  Funding up to $250 in reimbursement is available for UW Law students interested in attending.  Send a letter of interest and resume to mestorms@uw.edu by Feb 20 noon  if you would like to attend.

Attention Recent Grads! You Can Help Preserve Public Service Loan Forgiveness

Please don’t forget to fill out and pass on Equal Justice Works’ quick survey about the effect of Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) on your career. While they hear anecdotally how critical PSLF is to making long term public interest careers possible, there is little hard data on the program’s impact. If Congress does propose capping the amount of forgiveness borrowers can earn, this data will be invaluable in helping Equal Justice Works and a coalition of interested groups advocate for it. The deadline for completing the survey is March 2, but please complete it as soon as possible in case Congress acts sooner. Thank you for your help on this urgent issue!

Keep Up To Date on Student Debt Issues!

Make sure to follow Equal Justice Work’s new blog on the Huffington Post to keep up to date on student debt issues. They’ve been writing recently about “Affording College in a Time of Income Inequality,” “3 Student Loan Repayment Plans You Need to Know About,” and “8 Lessons We Learned About Student Debt From the Class of 2013.”

Want some money and a trip to D.C.? Need tips for upcoming job fairs? Want to be a racial justice advocate? Check these out!

Going to the Public Service Career Fair on February 6? Not Sure How You Can Prepare?  Check Out These Table Talk Tips & Career Fair Interviewing Tips!

NW PS Career Fair logoAttention all students! Planning on attending the NW Public Service Career Fair? Whether you have an official interview or not, don’t miss your chance to do table talk (informational interviews) the morning of the fair. Remember, organizations and agencies participate in table talk because it is an effective prescreening tool to recruit interns. There have been many instances where students were successful in securing internships through table talk so don’t miss  out! Center for Public Service Law staff will be at the fair for support and advice

See employers registered for Seattle

When: Friday, February 6, 2015

10-10:30—Student & Employer Check-in

10:30-12 noon—Table Talk

12:40-5:00pm – Pre-scheduled Interviews

Where:  LeRoux in the Student Center at Seattle University

Whether you’ve got an official interview lined up or not NW Public Interest Career Fair, here are some helpful tips to guide you on being a savvy table talker or interviewee.

Read more about table talk tips here.
Read more about career fair interviewing tips here.

Forget to register for the NW Public Interest Career Fair?  You can still register here. View a sample list of participating employers this year here.

Don’t miss this opportunity! Make sure to register for new online Racial Justice Training Institute trainings 

With recent events in Ferguson, Staten Island, and elsewhere, our nation is at a pivotal moment in understanding and addressing issues of race, implicit bias, and the structural barriers that marginalize communities of color. It is more important than ever for equal justice advocates to refocus their efforts to affirmatively advance racial equity.

Following the success of the inaugural 2014 Racial Justice Training Institute, the Sargent Shriver National Center on Poverty Law is pleased to announce the 2015 Racial Justice Training Institute. By placing the most up-to-date racial justice tools in the hands of front line advocates, the Institute provides real opportunities to address the impacts of structural racialization and ensure that race is front and center in our efforts to eradicate poverty in the communities we serve.

The Institute will cover a wide range of equity best practices ranging from traditional litigation and policy advocacy, to media and messaging, to the latest debiasing strategies. Working in teams, and with support from skilled faculty and facilitators, participants will use new racial justice knowledge and skills in their daily work and in the race-equity initiatives that teams will pursue throughout the Institute.

Taking place over six months (June—November 2015), the Institute includes three parts:

PART 1: Online (June 1—June 19, 2015)

PART 2: Onsite in Chicago (June 23-26, 2015)

PART 3: Online (July – November 2015)

Up to 35 advocates will be selected for the second Institute cohort based on a variety of factors, including experience, interest, goals, capacity, and racial and geographic diversity.

Learn more about the Racial Justice Training Institute

Application Deadline: February 27, 2015

Get your your materials ready for the 2015 Law Student Legal Writing Competition!

Eligibility:
Open to all students currently enrolled in an ABA Accredited Law School.

Topic:
Papers should address any legal issue regarding affordable housing and/or community development law.

Submission Requirements:

Entries must be original, unpublished work. Articles should be between 25-50 double-spaced pages and should include footnotes in Bluebook format. There is no entry form of any kind. Articles should be submitted in Word format. All author-identifying information should be removed from the article. A separate title page should be attached and must contain the article’s title, the student’s name, and the student’s contact information including street address, phone number(s), and email address.

Award:
Submissions will be blindly evaluated by a committee of Forum members. A single winning paper, as judged by the selection committee, will be awarded a prize of $1,000 and a trip to attend the Forum’s Annual Conference, May 20-22, 2015, in Washington, D.C., airfare and lodging included*. The winner is responsible for any taxes on fair market value of full award, including travel, registration and lodging. Winner will be required to submit a completed 1099 as a condition of receiving award.  The decision of the judges is final.

The winning essay may be published in the Journal of Affordable Housing and Community Development Law. If selected for publication, winner will be required to sign a standard publication agreement giving the ABA the right of first publication.

Date: All entries must be postmarked or emailed by March 6, 2015.

Send entries to the Journal’s Editor-in-Chief: 

James J. Kelly, Jr., Clinical Prof. of Law, Notre Dame Law School; J.Kelly@nd.edu. Please contact Dawn R. Holiday at dawn.holiday@americanbar.org, if you have any questions.

On this MLK day look through new social justice and public interest positions!

HIRING: For spring and summer 2015 – Disability Rights CA is seeking law clerk (rolling deadline)

Disability Rights California (DRC) is a nonprofit public interest law firm which is federally mandated to protect the legal, civil and service rights of persons with disabilities. Established in 1978, DRC served persons with developmental disabilities, such as intellectual disabilities, autism and other severe disabilities. In 1986, DRC expanded its services topersons with psychiatric disabilities. DRC now serves all Californians with disabilities—physical, psychiatric,and developmental.

Law clerks will carry a diverse workload that will help develop traditional legal skills as well as skills beneficial to working with clientele in a legal services environment. Law clerks will also gainsubstantive knowledge regarding the systems and laws that affect the lives of individuals with disabilities.

Law clerks at DRC will have the opportunity to:

  • Interview clients and consumers
  • Provide information on self-advocacy
  • Conduct legal research and produce legal writing
  • Represent clients in mediations and at administrative hearing
  • Provide assistance to people with disabilities who areincarcerated to ensure the enforcement of their legal rights
  • Assist clients in filing disability-based complaints with appropriate state and federal agencies
  • Investigate serious and systemic abuse and neglect instate and private facilities serving people with disabilities
  • Conduct trainings on disability law.

Although some DRC positions are available, preference is given to work-study and volunteer students. Attorneys at DRC are willing to assist students develop grant proposals and fellowship applications.

 

Jan. 21, 2015: U.S. Dept. of Justice – Federal Bureau of Prisons

This attorney will have the opportunity to work with Central Office, regional and institution management and line staff with respect to litigation affecting the Bureau of Prisons, as well as attorneys in the Solicitors General’s Office and other attorneys in the Department of Justice (DOJ) and in the U. S. Attorney’s Offices. The incumbent’s responsibilities include: analyzing adverse decisions against the BOP and drafting recommendations to DOJ for the Assistant Director/General Counsel’s signature, this includes cases before the Supreme Court; analyzing adverse decisions against other correctional agencies and developing a position for the Bureau on amicus participation by the United States in the Supreme Court; developing an expertise in the Prisoner Litigation Reform Act, Religious Freedom Restoration Act, and constitutional issues affecting Bureau litigation; providing training to Bureau and DOJ attorneys on issues affecting Bureau litigation; and participating in moot courts with assistant U.S. attorneys and DOJ attorneys.

The primary duties of the incumbent will be to respond to legal issues involving conditions of confinement arising out of specialized housing units, to include but not limited to, administrative remedy responses, requests for information under the Freedom of Information Act, replies to official correspondence, and manages litigation, to include discovery issues, affecting the Bureau of Prisons.

QUALIFICATIONS:

  • Applicant must possess a J.D. degree, be an active member of the bar (any jurisdiction), and have at least 1 year of post-J.D. experience
  • Preferred qualifications: Some litigation experience is desired.

 

Jan. 22, 2015: Assistant Attorneys General- Criminal Justice Division (Oregon)

The Oregon Department of Justice is seeking applications for an Assistant Attorney General to serve as a critical member of the Attorney General’s Criminal Justice Division. This position is based in Salem and will require periodic travel throughout the state.

The Criminal Justice Division is looking for an experienced prosecutor who is enthusiastic about working with federal, state and local law enforcement across the state to actively investigate and prosecute organized criminal enterprises, public corruption, internet crimes against children, and human trafficking.
Applicants will be expected to evaluate and pursue cases that will result in arrest and conviction. Applicants will also be expected to provide advice and support for District Attorneys and Deputy District Attorneys across the state, and to present at trainings. Additionally, applicants will be expected to prosecute conflict cases and specialty cases at the request of District Attorneys.
 
Experience prosecuting significant cases in a District Attorney’s office (or equivalent experience) is required. Experience prosecuting RICO cases and directing large-scale grand jury and criminal investigations is preferred, but not required.
This position will be filled at either the Assistant Attorney General or the Senior Assistant Attorney General level depending on experience and other factors. Questions regarding this position should be directed to Darin Tweedt, Chief Counsel of the Criminal Justice Division, at (503) 378-6347, (800) 735-1232 TTY.
QUALIFICATIONS:
  • All final candidates for employment must pass a thorough criminal background investigation.
  • Applicants must possess a certificate of admission to the Bar of the State of Oregon and be eligible to practice law before the courts of the State of Oregon at the time of appointment.
  • Experience prosecuting significant cases in a District Attorney’s office (or equivalent experience) is required. Experience prosecuting RICO cases and directing large-scale grand jury and criminal investigations is preferred, but not required.
  • Candidates from diverse backgrounds are encouraged to apply.  The Department of Justice is an equal opportunity employer, does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, religion, age or disability, and is committed to workplace diversity. The Department of Justice is an Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action Employer.

Jan. 29, 2015: Northwest Immigrant Rights Project seeks a new staff attorney

The Northwest Immigrant Rights Project (NWIRP) seeks a Spanish-speaking bilingual attorney to
provide direct representation, community outreach and education to survivors of domestic
violence and sexual assault and others who qualify for humanitarian protections. The staff attorney will provide legal assistance to community members through: (1) direct
representation (2) individual consultations; and (3) community education. The attorney will
focus on providing representation on cases involving U visa petitions, VAWA self-petitions,
adjustment of status applications and other forms of immigration relief. The attorney will also
provide representation in removal proceedings before the immigration court. The staff attorney
may also be assigned work relating to other immigration matters.

QUALIFICATIONS:

  • Law degree;
  • Admission to the bar of any state in the U.S., but will consider an applicant who has taken the bar exam and is awaiting results
  • Demonstrated commitment to immigrant rights and willingness to support NWIRP’s mission, vision and values;
  • Excellent written and oral communication skills;
  • Commitment to working in a diverse working environment;
  • Fluent in English and Spanish;
  • Prior experience working with survivors of domestic violence or sexual assault preferred;
  • Strong organizational skills and ability to work independently; and
  • Proficiency in use of web-based software, MS Word and MS Excel.

Feb. 1, 2015: New York Lawyers for Public Interest seeking staff attorney

New York Lawyers for the Public Interest (NYLPI), a nonprofit civil rights law firm committed to advancing equality and civil rights is seeking applicants for the position of Staff Attorney in
its Health Justice (HJ) Program to provide immigration representation and lead legal and policy
campaigns to increase health access for marginalized communities

QUALIFICATIONS

  • Must be an attorney in good standing.
  • Must either be licensed to practice law in the State of New York or be eligible for admission to the New York bar at the time of hiring (must be admitted within one year of hire).
  • A minimum of two years of experience with legal, policy and/or administrative advocacy.
  • A minimum of one year of experience representing clients in affirmative immigration applications and petitions such as asylum, I-130 and I-485 petitions, U- and TNonimmigrant status, and deferred action. Exceptional candidates with less experience will be considered.
  • Excellent strategic judgment and the drive to originate and effectuate challenging campaigns.
  • Experience working with coalitions of community members and community-based organizations.
  • Excellent writing, analytic and public speaking skills.

Feb. 6, 2015: Columbia Legal Services summer internship opportunities for law students!

Columbia Legal Services (CLS) is a statewide legal aid program in Washington State representing low-income people and vulnerable groups with critical civil legal needs. We represent clients in a wide variety of civil cases including class actions and legislative rule-making advocacy from five statewide offices: Seattle, Olympia, Wenatchee, Yakima and Kennewick. We offer several summer internship opportunities for law students. Summer Interns are expected to commit to full-time work for a minimum of 10 weeks. Most positions are for school credit, are paid under work-study, or are fellowship/public interest grant funded. The following positions are offered for 2015:

  • Basic Human Needs (Seattle) [Preference given to Seattle U and Gonzaga students]
  • Children & Youth Project (Seattle)
  • Institutions Project (Seattle)
  • Laurel Rubin Farmworker Justice Project (Olympia, Wenatchee, Yakima) [PAID position]
  • Working Families Project Foreclosure Work Group (Olympia) [Policy intern]
  • Working Families Project Foreclosure Work Group (Seattle)
  • Working Families Project Immigrant Workers Group (Seattle)

Feb. 13, 2015: 2015 Michael Maggio Immigrants’ Rights Summer Fellowship – CENTER FOR HUMAN RIGHTS AND CONSTITUTIONAL LAW

The primary mission of the Michael Maggio Immigrants’ Rights Fellowship is to strengthen law students’ long-term commitment to promote justice and equality for vulnerable immigrant groups.

The Fellowship will be awarded to one law student each summer to work on a student-initiated project. Students must submit a project proposal with an organization willing to host the student for 10 weeks and provide a $1,500 stipend (the Maggio Immigrants’ Rights Fellowship will provide a $2,500 stipend). The Fellow will be required to provide reports half way through and at the conclusion of the Fellowship, regarding his or her progress in meeting the goals of the project. The host organization must be willing to supervise and provide all logistical needs of the Fellow including office space and supplies. Host organization will also be asked to provide a brief report at the end of the Fellowship.

QUALIFICATIONS:

  • Law student (1L, 2L, or 3L) in good standing at any accredited law school program in the United States.
  • Demonstrated commitment to social justice and/or immigrants’ rights issues.

Mar. 1, 2015: Northwest Immigrants Rights Project – Intern for 1Ls, 2Ls, and 3Ls!

NWIRP’s Seattle Office services low-income immigrants and refugees in Western Washington. The office provides direct legal representation, referrals to pro bono attorneys, pro se assistance, and workshops on immigration matters ranging from asylum, citizenship, family petitions, and protections for immigrant children and victims of crimes.

Under the supervision of attorneys, interns will assist with case matters before the Immigration Court and the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). Depending on unit placement, interns’ responsibilities may include: Conducting legal research and drafting briefs in support of applications for relief; researching country conditions in support of claims for asylum; preparing and submitting filings with the Immigration Court and USCIS; and working directing with clients, such as conducting intakes and drafting client declarations in support of
applications for relief.

QUALIFICATIONS

  • The internship is open to first, second, and third year law students. Applicants should have excellent written and oral communication skills, an interest in immigration law, an ability to work in a diverse and fast-paced work environment, and a commitment to advancing and defending the legal rights of low-income immigrants and refugees.
  • Applicants proficient in Spanish are strongly preferred.
  • The internship is unpaid, but NWIRP will work with applicants to secure outside funding or academic credit.

 

National Center for Youth Law (NCYL) seeking juvenile justice attorney in their Oakland office (rolling deadline)

The National Center for Youth Law (NCYL) (www.youthlaw.org) is a non-profit organization that for more than four decades has used the law to ensure that low-income children have the resources, support, and opportunities they need for a fair start in life. NCYL’s primary areas of focus are child welfare, juvenile justice, and health/mental health.

NCYL seeks an attorney to lead projects aimed at improving the educational outcomes of probation-involved youth. The work will focus on serving youth who have been adjudicated delinquent and remain under the jurisdiction of the probation agency, but are not in a locked facility. The attorney will be supervised by NCYL attorneys with expertise in juvenile justice and foster youth education.

The attorney’s primary responsibilities will include, but are not limited to:

  • Adapting FosterEd’s model, strategies, program materials, and technology tools to meet the needs of probation-involved youth;
  • Partnering with state and local agency partners to implement programs serving probation-involved youth;
  • Developing measurable project objectives and detailed workplans; and
  • Ensuring implementation of program goals and outcomes.

This job will not involve providing direct legal representation to juveniles.

QUALIFICATIONS

  • Law degree
  • Ability to work with probation, child welfare, education, and judicial agencies, and with at-risk youth and their families; to manage complex projects; to pay close attention to details and manage multiple assignments; and to work in a fast-paced nonprofit environment
  • Excellent writing, speaking, and interpersonal skills
  • Demonstrated commitment to improving the lives of at-risk youth

Desired Qualifications:

  • An understanding of the education, child welfare, probation, and juvenile court systems
  • Significant experience working with the juvenile probation system and/or the juvenile court system
  • Experience forming and participating in cross-system collaborative teams; working directly with at-risk children and youth; and working with data

 

Have an Interest in Pursuing a Career in Elder Law? The UW Retirement Association Seeks Applicants for $4,000 Scholarship

Are a you a UW Law student? Have an Interest in Pursuing a Career in Elder Law? The UW Retirement Association Seeks Applicants for $4,000 Scholarship! Applications Due Feb. 3

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Each year, UWRA awards scholarships to UW undergraduate, graduate and professional students who are preparing for careers related to aging. Students from a wide variety of disciplines have received these scholarships, which are awarded in Spring quarter each year. UWRA has also endowed a Graduate Fellowship in Aging that is awarded each year by the Graduate School. Learn about the Graduate Fellowship here. Each year’s Scholarship and Fellowship recipients join with UWRA members for a scholarship celebration in the spring.

For more information, click here.

Want to Join the Fight to End the Criminalization of Homelessness?  National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty releases report on, Human Rights to Human Reality

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A 10 Step Guide to Strategic Human Rights Advocacy

Working consistently for the past two decades, the Law Center is achieving unprecedented success in getting federal agencies to address the criminalization of homelessness as a human rights violation. This guide presents ten steps as a case study of our experiences that we believe can help others achieve broader respect for, and implementation of, human rights.

Click here to access the report.

Interested in Exploring Global Health Law and Policy Issues? Join the Legal and Policy Solutions to Improve the Global Health of Women, Children & Adolescents Lecture Series

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If you are interested in exploring global health law and policy issues from a multidisciplinary perspective, please join us for Legal and Policy Solutions to Improve the Global Health of Women, Children & Adolescents, a lecture series and course that meets Tuesdays from 5:30 – 7 pm Winter Quarter.

Each Tuesday, we invite three expert practitioners –one from medicine/public health/health science, one from law/policy, and one from a community organization/NGO –  to discuss health topics that impact women, children and adolescents in the US and around the world.  We have some amazing speakers lined up so far, ranging from a pediatrician from Kenya who works to prevent mother-child HIV transmission to a Seattle City Councilwoman who has led advocacy for a paid parental leave ordinance.

Feel free to attend any session.  The series is also open to all UW students and the public, so you can attend any session that is of interest without enrolling for course credit.

Enrollment/grading.  You can also enroll to receive one course credit for attending the speaker series (LAW H518 A/B) or two credits for attending both the speaker series and a small discussion group that meets beforehand from 4:20 – 5:20 pm (LAW H518 C/D, meeting in Room 115).  Both sections will be graded on a credit/no credit basis.  Students of the speaker series (LAW H518 A/B) receive credit for attending the lectures – readings are optional.  Students of the discussion group (LAW H518 C/D) receive credit for reading the assigned articles and participating in the discussion.

Course organizers:  Jennifer Lenga-Long, JD; Tanya Karwaki, JD, LLM; Brandi Shah MD, MPH; and Jennifer Slyker, PhD

Click here for the scheduled topics.

Attention 1Ls! Employers Now Accepting 1L Applications!

Northwest Immigrant Rights Project Seeking Spanish-Bilingual Attorneys to Work in Wenatchee and Granger, Priority Deadline TODAY

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Wenatchee, WA Staff Attorney Position

The Northwest Immigrant Rights Project (NWIRP) seeks a Spanish‐speaking bilingual attorney to work in our office in Wenatchee, Washington. Depending on the experience of the applicant, she or he may be considered for a supervising attorney position.

The attorney will provide legal assistance to community members. The attorney will work closely with other staff members and community partners in the Eastern and Central Washington regions in conducting outreach and community education, and providing individual consultations to persons who may be eligible for immigration benefits.

For more information, click here.

Granger, WA Staff Attorney Position

The Northwest Immigrant Rights Project (NWIRP) seeks a Spanish speaking bilingual attorney to provide direct representation, community outreach and education to individuals seeking legal assistance in a variety of immigration matters.

This position is based in NWIRP’s Granger Office, which is located in Granger, WA, a city of over 3,000 people located in a rural area 25 miles southeast of Yakima.  From this location, the office serves clients from across Central and Eastern Washington.  The office has a staff of seven and serves a client base consisting largely of farmworkers and their families.

For more information, click here.

2015 Judith Stronach Summer Fellowship with the Center for Gender and Refugee Studies at UC Hastings Law, Applications Due TODAY!

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The Center for Gender and Refugee Studies (CGRS), based at the University of California Hastings College of the Law, is seeking law student candidates for our 2015 Judith Stronach Summer Fellow positions. CGRS provides legal expertise, training, and resources to attorneys representing asylum seekers, advocates to protect refugees, advances refugee law and policy, and uses domestic, regional and international mechanisms to address the root causes of persecution.

Summer fellowship positions are full-time for 10- to 12-week terms. Law fellows are involved in the full range of CGRS’s work, and work closely with CGRS lawyers and staff in other projects as needed.

For more information, click here.

Open Society Institute (OSI) Seeking Legal Research Intern, Due TODAY!

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The Open Society Justice Initiative uses law to protect and empower people around the world. Through litigation, advocacy, research, and technical assistance, the Justice Initiative promotes human rights and builds legal capacity for open societies. We foster accountability for international crimes, combat racial discrimination and statelessness, support criminal justice reform, address abuses related to national security and counterterrorism, expand freedom of information and expression, and stem corruption linked to the exploitation of natural resources.

The objective of the internship program with the Open Society Justice Initiative is to train participants on some of the methodologies used by public interest advocacy groups like Open Society to foster and encourage reform, inclusion, human rights, and the building of legal capacity for open societies.

For more information, click here.

House of Delegates Office of the Legal Counsel Seeking House Legal Counsel, Due 12/5/14

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Duties and Responsibility: The Legal Counsel for the House of Delegates will:

  • Draft bills, resolutions, committee reports, speeches, letters and other correspondence as needed or requested by the Delegates
  • Perform legal research and issue legal opinions on questions as requested by the Delegates
  • Review international treaties and conventions, executive orders, and administrative rules and regulations
  • Analyze proposed legislation for constitutionality and legal forms
  • Advise Delegates on legislative procedure
  • Attend meetings with international organizations and government agencies
  • Represent the House of Delegates in litigation filed by or involving the House of Delegates as needed
  • Manage and supervise Legal Counsel Office staff and interns; coordinate Legal Counsel Office internship program

For more information, click here.

Surge Northwest Seeking Program & Outreach Director, Due 12/8/14

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Surge Northwest is looking for an exceptional person to fill our new Program & Outreach Coordinator position and help grow our organization and efforts. This person will work in a team with our board and partner organizations. This requires a diverse set of skills, attributes, and experience.

Do you love working in collaboration to find creative solutions to thorny problems? Are you Passionate about reproductive justice and organizing for change? This is an opportunity to join our team and help build a new organization dedicated to social change through community engagement.

For more information, click here.

Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR) Seeking International Human Rights Program Intern in New York, Due 12/12/14

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The Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR) seeks a third or fourth year undergraduate student, recent graduate, or graduate student with a strong commitment to social justice to help with several legal and advocacy-related projects as part of a semester-long unpaid internship opportunity. CCR is a national not-for-profit legal, educational, and advocacy organization dedicated to advancing and protecting the rights guaranteed by the United States Constitution and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Founded in 1966 by attorneys who represented civil rights movements in the South, CCR is committed to the creative use of law as a positive force for social change.

The International Human Rights (IHR) docket focuses on holding government officials and corporations accountable for serious violations of international law, primarily under the Alien Tort Statute, the Torture Victim Protection Act, and the principle of universal jurisdiction. It works primarily in U.S. courts, but also is involved in litigation in foreign and international courts, and advocacy using regional or international human rights mechanisms.

The intern will work 10-25 hours per week between January and May 2015, assisting legal workers and attorneys in CCR’s IHR docket on several on-going projects and case development. The intern will have the opportunity to work on a range of issues and cases.

For more information, click here.

US Department of Health & Human Services Seeking Pathways Legal Intern, Due 12/12

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Become a part of the Department that touches the lives of every American! At the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) you can give back to your community, state, and country by making a difference in the lives of Americans everywhere. It is the principal agency for protecting the health of citizens. Join HHS and help to make our world healthier, safer, and better for all Americans.

The Office of the General Counsel (OGC) is the legal team for the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), providing quality representation and legal advice on a wide range of highly visible national issues. OGC supports the development and implementation of the Department’s programs by providing the highest quality legal services to the Secretary of HHS and the organization’s various agencies and divisions.

Opportunities are available in the OGC offices in different practice areas.

For more information about Washington DC positions, click here.

For more information about New York positions, click here.

Seattle University Law School Seeking Director for the Academic Resource Center (ARC), Due 12/15 For Full Consideration

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Seattle University School of Law invites applications to serve as the Director for the Academic Resource Center (ARC), ideally beginning on June 1, 2015. ARC is a nationally renowned academic support program, which is known for its commitment to providing access to the legal profession. The ARC program’s dual purpose is to support the diverse and non-traditional students admitted through SU’s Access Admission Program so they excel in law school and beyond, as well as to provide general academic support and bar preparation assistance to the entire student body. The ideal candidate will have expertise and experience in providing academic support for law students, as well as teaching excellence and administrative capability.

For more information, click here.

Center for Reproductive Rights Still Seeking US Policy and Advocacy Summer 2015 Law Student Intern in Washington DC, Students Encouraged to Apply by 12/15

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The Center for Reproductive Rights is a nonprofit legal advocacy organization dedicated to advancing reproductive freedom as a fundamental right that all governments are legally obligated to protect, respect, and fulfill. The Center engages in cutting-edge impact litigation, policy analysis, advocacy, research, and public education throughout the world, to achieve women’s equality in society and to ensure that all women have access to appropriate and freely chosen reproductive health services.

The Center’s U.S. Policy and Advocacy Program is looking for enthusiastic, resourceful and highly organized law student interns with a commitment to reproductive rights issues to assist with a variety of projects involving policy analysis and advocacy. This internship will focus primarily on federal policy but may also include opportunities to support the Center’s state policy and domestic human rights advocacy work. Successful candidates will experience the day-to-day operations of a dynamic in-house policy team, including but not limited to legislative analysis and drafting, coalition advocacy, and translating legal and legislative language into persuasive policy documents.

For more information, click here.

The US Department of Veterans Affairs, Office of Regional Counsel Seattle Seeking Volunteer Law Clerk and Offering Officer Manager Position

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The U.S. Dept. of Veterans Affairs, Office of Regional Counsel, Seattle, is offering practica in our 5-attorney law office this summer.  These are volunteer positions that will provide the students with broad exposure to a variety of areas, including medical malpractice law and personnel/EEO litigation.  Other areas of practice include: employee ethics, bioethics, government contracts, fiduciary law and release of information law.  Legal research and writing and assisting with development of cases will be part of the clerks’ responsibilities.  Attendance at hearings, federal court proceedings and other meetings involving issues our clients face will also be offered.  Both first-year and second-year students are encouraged to apply.

*Deadline for applications: December 15, 2014.  Half-time or full-time positions available.  Summer 2015 and/or Fall 2015 positions available.  Please submit resume, cover letter, and writing sample to:  Michael Hughes, Regional Counsel, 100 SW Main Street, Floor 2 Portland, OR 97204 or 915 Second Ave., Suite 1386, Seattle, WA 98174.

Attention 1Ls! 5 Public Service Career Planning Tips for the Holidays

Attention 1Ls!  Five Public Service Career Planning Tips for the Holidays

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By Aline Carton-Listfjeld, Center for Public Service Law

Did you miss our recent public service career strategies presentation? Fret not. Here’s the cliff notes version. You can also watch the video podcast here. 

The holidays are a time to rest, spend time with loved ones, practice gratitude and engage in a thoughtful practice of reflection, research and action planning for your career in public service and/or social justice. Here are some career strategizing tips to make the best of the upcoming Thanksgiving holiday and winter break right around the corner.

  1. Get back to basics. Why law school? Why public service? What issues do you care about? Think about why you came to law school and why specifically you’re interested in public service and/or working for social justice. What personal, volunteer or professional experiences or events have shaped your world view? What causes are you passionate about or get you worked up? What areas of law are you interested in? Why?
    • Write these anecdotes down; this will help you with your cover letter writing.
    • Practice telling these stories at the Thanksgiving dinner table; this will help you when you’re networking and interviewing.
    • Learn more about why stories matter by Marshall Ganz.
  2. Identify lawyering skills. Think about what kinds of advocacy and other lawyering skills you’re drawn towards.
    • Direct Services. Providing direct services to individual clients including advice/counsel, brief services and/or representation in court or administrative proceedings.
    • Systemic Change through Litigation. Engaging in impact litigation/systemic advocacy such as class action law suits which may not involve quite as much direct client work.
    • Community Lawyering. Using the principles of community organizing, combining direct services, impact litigation, and transactional legal services to support community economic development and/or other community-driven social justice initiatives.
    • Public Policy & Politics. Engaging in policy and/or legislative advocacy or reform work either within our outside of a legislative body.
    • Alternative Dispute Resolution. Engaging in alternative means of achieving justice outside of the traditional adversarial system such as alternative dispute resolution, mediation, collaborative law, and restorative justice.
    • Leadership & Social Entrepreneurship. Exploring alternative public service law careers including non-profit leadership/management and social entrepreneurship
  3. Do your research. We want you to make informed, evidence-based decisions to help you carve your career path. Research organizations and agencies that work on the causes and substantive areas that you are passionate about, interested in and/or open to. Where do you start? Go out to coffee with your mentor or perhaps the growing list of contacts with whom you’ve been advised to connect. Check out all of the great resources on our public service career reference guide, the Gallagher Law Library research guide and PSJD. Also, learn about the employers participating in the upcoming NW Public Service Career Fair. Keep in mind that employers are registering on a rolling basis so be sure to check back regularly.
  4. Create a list of preferred employers. Get ready to start applying to summer opportunities. Many public service internships application deadlines are in January and February. Whether or not a non-profit organization or government agency has a posted internship announcement, plan on sending your application materials. This usually includes a resume, cover letter, sometimes a list of references, and maybe a writing sample (yes you can use that 1L memo!). If an employer asks for grades be sure to mention when you expect to receive your grades in your cover letter and send them your transcript when it becomes available.
  5. Get cover letter feedback from your career coach. Take a break from outlining! December is a great time to send cover letters to your career coach for feedback. Once you’ve created a list of employers, draft a cover letter using the tips found here.

Interested in Learning More About Immigration? Register for the New Immigration Policy Seminar for the Winter Quarter

Associated Press Detention Center Holding Cell

B512 Legislation and the Formulation of Public Policy
By: Professor Angelica Chazaro

This course will examine immigration laws and policies related to how removal (deportation) laws and policies are established and implemented, and including the emergence and role of social change movements. Topics will include the intersection of immigration and criminal law, border security, state and local enforcement, the root causes of unauthorized migration, and the challenges of immigration law reform. The course will cover both legal doctrine and legislative issues concerning immigration detention and enforcement.

This course is mandatory for the immigration-related externships with the Washington Defender’s Association and NWIRP.  Externship applications are due Monday, November 24.  See Symplicity for more details.

Attention Attorneys! Free CLE on Domestic Violence Legal Team Training

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Thursday, December 4, 2014
8:30 AM – 3:00 PM
Perkins Coie (1201 Third Ave #4900, Seattle)
FREE (attendees must pledge to volunteer either for DVAP or DVIP)
Lunch Provided
CLE Credits: Pending (includes ethics credits)
RSVP to April Campbell by Monday, November 24, 2014

This is a FREE training and ideal for both litigators and transactional lawyers.
There are two volunteer options covered in this training: (1) going into court to litigate motions and (2) volunteering for the in-shelter legal clinic.

Litigators: Volunteer for the Domestic Violence Advocacy Project (DVAP). Learn how you can be an effective advocate for domestic violence survivors by litigating motions for revision and reconsideration, and increasing your chances of success at return hearings. Build your courtroom advocacy skills while making a meaningful difference in the life of a survivor and her children. Cases are for a short time frame with a discrete time commitment.

Transactional Lawyers: Volunteer at the Domestic Violence Impact Project’s (DVIP) monthly in-shelter legal clinic. You’ll have the opportunity to meet with a survivor and empower her through education and helping her draft a declaration that will be attached to her petition. No court required. Discrete time commitment.

If you have any questions about this CLE please email April Campbell.

Attorney General sends Notice of Endangerment and Intent to Sue to U.S. Dept. of Energy and its contractors to protect workers from hazardous Hanford tank vapors

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By: Bob Ferguson, Washington State Office of the Attorney General

After 20 years and many reports and studies, federal government still not adequately protecting Hanford workers

Attorney General Bob Ferguson is sending the U.S. Dept. of Energy, and its contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), a Notice of Endangerment and Intent to Sue. Ferguson seeks to protect workers at the federal Hanford Nuclear Reservation from hazardous chemical vapors that continue to jeopardize worker health and safety.

On Oct. 30, 2014, an independent panel of experts issued the federally-funded Hanford Tank Vapor Assessment Report which determined that “ongoing emission of tank vapors, which contain a mixture of toxic chemicals, is inconsistent with the provisions of a safe and healthful workplace free from recognized hazards.”  They further found that the data “strongly suggests a causal link between chemical vapor release and subsequent adverse health effects experienced by tank farm workers.”

The report was the latest in a series of reports assessing the problem of tank workers falling sick after exposure to chemical vapors from on-site waste holding tanks.

Continue reading here.

Campaign for Equal Justice: Support Legal Aid on Giving Tuesday, December 2nd

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With Thanksgiving and Black Friday just around the corner, we are all looking forward to getting great deals on Christmas gifts and holiday treats. But don’t forget to set a little aside for people in need on Giving Tuesday!

As our November newsletter noted, the Campaign is still about $600,000 away from raising the funds clients like Zahul need to receive legal aid. Your generosity this holiday season will make the difference.

Plan a gift to help out low-income people in legal crisis on Giving Tuesday, December 2nd.

All you have to do is visit our secure online donation page on December 2nd to make your gift.  Thanks for remembering people in need!

Interested in a Career in Public Service? Get Tips on Career Strategies!

November 17: GPSS Invites You to The Innovation Pipeline

Monday, Nov. 17, 2014
3:00 – 4:00 PM
The Husky Union Building, RM 250

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November 18: Social Justice Tuesday – “Civil Rights and Employment Law: Labor Issues in Marginalized Populations”

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Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2014
12:30 – 1:20 PM
Gates Hall, RM 127

Hosted by: Students for Labor and Employment Justice

Come hear two experts in the field speak about the ever-changing landscape of labor and employment law.

Panelists:

  • Sarah Leyrer, Staff Attorney with Columbia Legal Services
  • Bill Tamayo, EEOC Regional Attorney for the Northwestern United States

If you would like lunch please RSVP via Symplicity or gatespsl@uw.edu RSVP by 12:00 pm Monday, November 17, 2014.

November 19: Intro to Public Service Law Career Strategies

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Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014
12:30 – 1:20 PM
Gates Hall, RM 127

  • How do I research opportunities?
  • How can I use my law degree?
  • What are examples of public service?
  • How do I realize my public service goals?
  • What are some upcoming opportunities?

Featuring:
Mary Whisner, Reference Librarian
Aline Carton-Listfjeld, Assistant Director, Center for Public Service Law

November 19: Are You a 1L Interested in Big Law? Attend Creating Competitive 1L Application Materials

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Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014
5:30 PM
Gates Hall, RM 119

A panel of WSBA Diversity Committee attorneys will discuss how to create competitive application materials for 1L Diversity Fellowships. Students who submit either a cover letter or draft personal statement in advance will have their material reviewed by an attorney and receive individual feedback after the panel presentation. 1Ls must submit their draft personal statement or cover letter for review to Joy Williams at joyw@wsba.org before November 14 at noon. The subject line of the email should state “UW Law School Partnership.” Light food and beverage will be provided at the event.

Get more information about Diversity Fellowship qualifications on the CPLD Information for 1Ls website. Please do not self-select out of this process!

Co-hosted by MLSA, LBA, and the WSBA Diversity Committee. Sponsored by Schwabe, Williamson & Wyatt.

RSVP in Symplicity.

November 20: Register Now for “Emergency Response: Crises in Africa” with Dr. Helene Gayle

Dr. Helene Gayle Moderated by Mark Wright, KING5 News Anchor

Thursday, Nov. 20, 2014
6:00 PM
Seattle Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce
(1301 5th Avenue, Floor 15)

Food insecurity, armed conflict, and limited access to health services are some of the many issues confronting millions of women, children, and families throughout Africa. Helene D. Gayle, MD, MPH, President and CEO of CARE USA, will be discussing the impact current events in Africa, including the Ebola crisis and South Sudan conflict, are having on vulnerable communities, and why women and girls are especially at risk. For nearly 70 years, CARE has been a leading humanitarian organization fighting global poverty. Today, CARE works in 87 countries, placing special emphasis on involving women and girls in their community-based efforts to improve basic education, end gender-based violence, provide healthcare and nutrition, increase access to clean water and sanitation, expand economic opportunity and protect natural resources. CARE also delivers emergency aid to survivors of war and natural disasters, and helps people rebuild their lives.

To register, click here.

February 20: Save the Date! Rolling Out the Red Carpet for PILA’s 20th Annual Benefit Auction

PILA 20th Auction Benefit

Friday, Feb. 20, 2014
5:30 PM
Husky Union Building

To celebrate 20 years of funding public interest, we’re ROLLING OUT THE RED CARPET

Join us for a night of Old Hollywood Glamour!

Formal attire encouraged.

$105 PER PERSON ($130 AFTER JAN. 10)
$70 FOR REDUCED ADMISSION* ($80 AFTER JAN. 10)
$790 PER TABLE OF 8 ($940 AFTER JAN. 10)
$540 FOR REDUCED PRICE TABLE OF 8* ($640 AFTER JAN. 10)

*Available to students, nonprofit employees, government employees, and those otherwise unable to afford a regularly priced ticket. Students may buy 1 additional ticket.

RSVP by FEBRUARY 11TH, 2015 online at pila.ejoinme.org/tickets
QUESTIONS? PILA@UW.EDU