De-stress this hump day with fellowships, volunteer opportunities, and some reading material

Due 2/13: Michael Maggio Immigrants’ Rights Summer Fellowship 

Since its inception in 2009, the Michael Maggio Immigrants’ Rights Summer Fellowship Program has awarded a dedicated law school student each summer the opportunity to engage in a self-initiated project that strengthens their commitment for advocacy and promotes justice and equality for vulnerable immigrant groups. The Fellowship was established by the Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law (CHRCL), the National Immigration Project of the National Lawyers Guild (NIP/NLG), and the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) to commemorate the life and legal contributions of Michael Maggio and to continue his pursuit for equality and peace. The Fellowship is a wonderful opportunity for any law school student who is driven to raise awareness and fight for the underserved immigrant community.

  The Fellowship awards $2,500 to a law student to work on an immigration related student-initiated project. Applicants must submit a project proposal with an organization willing to host the student for 10 weeks during the summer. The student’s proposal must include a collaborative plan with the host organization to partially match the Fellowship award in the amount of $1,500. This matching may be done by either direct stipend by the host organization or through other means, e.g., law school public interest funding, independent fundraising, etc. This ensures that the student will receive a total funding in the amount of $4,000.

 To learn more about the Fellowship and to download the application form, select here. Also, please visit www.maggiofellowship.org to learn more about Michael Maggio, and to download the application and instructions in Microsoft Word format.

 If you have specific questions about the fellowship program, please contact Marchela Iahdjian, Staff Attorney at marchela@centerforhumanrights.org and Peter Schey, President of the Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law at pschey@centerforhumanrights.org. 

Just What Does it Mean to Lead with your Best Self? by Dan Mulhern

February 9, 2015, Everyday Leadership

Dan MulhernI have been signing-off Reading for Leading for 15 years with the line “lead with your best self.” What do I mean by that? And, more importantly, what do you take from it?

Here is perhaps the acid test of leading with your best self. A story. I moved back to Detroit when I was 28. Ten years earlier, I had left for college, then run a neighborhood center in New Orleans, gone to law school, and returned, impassioned to make a difference in my home city. I really thought I knew a lot, and I wanted to challenge the way things were running which, at the same, seemed abysmal. I got a great job in county government, got active in school board politics, and was reaching out to find out how I could contribute. Somebody told me I should meet with Detroit’s director of parks and recreation; he was a minister, a great guy, I was told. And he agreed to have lunch with me.

I remember that I was confrontative. I wondered, perhaps rudely, how he could deal with the city’s seeming complacency, as more people moved out, racial animosities continued to divide us, schools were being closed, and crime was the only consistent thing going. He din’t take the bait, never got defensive. All he did was encourage me! All he did was ask me my thoughts and opinions. All he did was calmly explain what he and others were trying to accomplish and ask what I thought and how I could help. His kindness disarmed me. His intellectual curiosity kept me from maintaining my judgmental attitude and arrogance. That was in 1988.

I was lucky enough to have my life thread in and around Dan Krichbaum’s for the next 26 years. I am still terribly shook that he was hit by two strokes — and died last week. I honestly can’t imagine Detroit and Michigan and the world without him. Continue reading here.

Help by volunteering at El Centro de la Raza with LBAW’s Legal Clinic

LBAWLBAW is in great need of volunteers (attorneys, law students, translators) for this month’s Legal Clinic on Wednesday, February 11th.  We expect that many people will show up for consultations and we need your help! PLEASE consider volunteering this month and throughout 2015.  The Clinic takes place the 2nd Wednesday of each month at El Centro.

Don’t speak Spanish??  No sweat!  We will provide you with a translator. Just complete the Volunteer Application.  Attorneys needed in the following practice areas:

  • Family Law *especially high need in this area*
  • Immigration
  • Criminal Law *especially high need in this area*
  • Personal Injury
  • Employment Law
  • Property/Landlord Tenant *especially high need in this area*

Law Students and translators needed for intakes and translation.  If you would like to help in another way, please let us know.

Due: 3/16 –2015-2017 Jerry Shestack Justice Fellowship

The Jerry Shestack Justice Fellowship is a two-year litigation-focused fellowship that will be selected on a bi-annual basis by the Lawyers’ Committee in consultation with the Shestack Justice Advisory Committee. Jerry Shestack was an extraordinary lawyer and a driving force in advancing the cause of civil and human rights. One of his greatest legacies was his central role in the founding of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law in 1963.

 Law school graduates who have passed the bar and have 2 to 3 years of outstanding litigation experience and/or judicial clerkships are eligible. The chosen Fellow will have demonstrated a passion and commitment to civil rights issues and public service and have shown promise of becoming an exceptional litigator. Fellows are paid at the same salary of Lawyers’ Committee attorneys with the same number of years of experience.

How to Apply:  Applications are due on March 16, 2015. We expect to announce the successful applicant in June. The Shestack Fellow will begin working at the Lawyers’ Committee in fall 2015. Please apply at https://podio.com/webforms/10775370/768081. Applications must include the following materials:

  • Resume
  • Law school transcript
  • Two page letter of intent
  • Two letters of recommendation
  • Writing sample

This oppressed, unjust (U.S.) American life by Shafaq Hasan

From Nonprofit Quarterly and National Public Radio, WUWM (Milwaukee, WI) 

Increasingly, some outlets are using longer-form journalism to bring their readers or listeners more deeply into an issue. This American Life is one of those outlets, despite the recent kerfuffle about its journalistic chops.

As outgoing Attorney General Eric Holder spends his last few weeks in office speaking to civilians about community relations with their local police departments, the issue is also taking center stage in a new podcast series by This American Life, a weekly radio program recently popularized by the true crime podcast, Serial.

Narrated by Brian Reed, the new two-part series, “Cops See It Differently,” was launched online last Friday and delves into the contentious relations between police departments and their communities, particularly minority communities. It’s an issue that erupted into public discourse last year following the deaths of Eric Garner and Michael Brown, leading to the Black Lives Matter movement.

This first part of the series focuses on the police department in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and ardent, good-intentioned police chief Ed Flynn in particular. By the time he came into the position back in 2008, there were already deep-seated tensions underlying community and police relations in Milwaukee, a city with a great racial divide.

The episode takes listeners through some of the Milwaukee department’s more controversial policing moments, such as the death of 22-year-old Derrick Williams, who died in the back of a squad car after telling officers, “I can’t breathe.” (That’s right; Milwaukee had its own Eric Garner three years before the Staten Island case.) The episode also looks into the aftermath of the police shooting death of mentally ill Dontre Hamilton, which resulted in the firing of the officer and a heated town hall meeting that was frustrating for both the community and police department.

But it’s the prologue of the series that provides the most succinct depiction of how many minorities feel about local police officers. Back in September, Lisa Mahone of Hammond, Indiana, her two children, and her friend Jamal Jones were pulled over for a routine traffic stop that escalated to police officers pulling their guns and demanding Mahone step out of the car. Fearing for her life, Mahone called 911—on the police officers. Continue reading here.

It’s winter time, so warm up with some with these upcoming community events!

Jan. 24, 2015: Body-worn cameras: Will they increase police accountability? 

The Seattle Police Commission will be hosting a panel discussion about the initiation of Seattle Police Department’s body cameras to answer the community’s questions about the new initiative, in light of recent events. Panelists will include: Jay Hollingsworth (John T. Williams Organizing Committee), Marissa Johnson & Dan Bash (Outside Agitators 206), Andrew Myerberg (Assistant City Attorney of Seattle), Jennifer Shaw (ACLU), Detective Ron Smith (Seattle Police Officers’ Guild), and Mike Wagers (Seattle Police Department). The event will be moderated by Fe Lopez. The meeting will be held on Saturday, January 24 from 9:30am to 12:00pm at 7054 32nd Ave South. If you have any questions feel free to contact Tracy Whitlatch at (206) 233-2664 or tracym.whitlatch@seattle.gov.

Jan. 28: Job Search Strategies for People with Disabilities from 12:30-1:20 pm (Room 127)

What kinds of questions can employers ask regarding an applicant’s disability? Should you mention that you have a disability in a cover letter or interview? If so, how do you discuss it? Join the Disability Law Alliance, Diversity Committee, Center for Professionalism and Leadership Development, and Center for Public Service Law for a panel discussion on navigating some legal, professionalism and etiquette issues for people with disabilities seeking employment!

Jan. 27: Homeless youth in Seattle

Presented by: Street Youth Legal Advocates of Washington

SJTThe panel will discuss the challenges of working with homeless youth in the Seattle area. Their experiences include running programs for homeless youth, the mental health aspects of homelessness, and legislative advocacy. They will speak about the legal and non-legal issues facing homeless youth in Seattle, the organizations they work with, and how we as students can help.

Panelists:

  • Ellen Sims, Divine Roots Wellness
  • Hickory Gateless, Center for Children and Youth Justice
  • Katara Jordan, Columbia Legal Services

Jan. 29: Debt and Democracy – How the collection of civil fees and fines contributed to the unrest in Ferguson

This webinar will discuss the levying and collection of unfair fees and fines by municipalities and their courts. According to The New York Times, unjust municipal fee and fine practices were one of the “simmering” issues underlying tensions in Ferguson, Missouri following the killing of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown by a Ferguson police officer. According to The Times, “Young black men in Ferguson and surrounding cities routinely find themselves passed from jail to jail as they are picked up on warrants for unpaid fines.” The webinar will present an overview of the causes, consequences and pervasiveness of the problem, and impact on the community, both in Missouri and around the nation. The webinar will also discuss steps to address the problem, including policy advocacy, legislation and litigation. Register for the webinar here.

Jan 30-31: Arctic Encounter Symposium 

The second annual Arctic Encounter Symposium will challenge participants to tackle the shared interests and concerns of the United States and the global community as we look north to the last emerging frontier – the Arctic. Leading experts, CEOs, and thought leaders from the science, technology, maritime, and energy sectors, will gather to challenge the status quo dialogue, critically address challenges to realizing the Arctic’s full potential and collaborate on solutions. Participants will include key industry leaders, policy makers, and regional stakeholders.

This year’s symposium will focus on the role of the U.S. as an arctic nation and the challenges it will confront in its upcoming chairmanship of the Arctic Council, including: climate change, natural resources, investment opportunities, and international relations. The goal of the 2015 Arctic Encounter is to facilitate a creative environment for the development of a proactive agenda, short and long-term domestic and international priorities, and a strategic execution plan.

The two-day program includes complimentary continental breakfast, coffee, and keynote luncheons on both Friday and Saturday. Participants will enjoy a networking reception and seated dinner at the Museum of History and Industry (MOHAI) at Lake Union on the evening of Friday, January 30. A closing reception will take place at the conclusion of the program on Saturday, January 31.

CLE credit is available to attending attorneys. Please direct questions to mgavin2@uw.edu

The AES Committee is pleased to announce the following committed speakers at this time:

  • Senator Lisa Murkowski, United States Senate – Alaska State Legislature
  • Vice Admiral Charles W. Ray, Pacific Area Commander, U.S. Coast Guard Defense Force West
  • Fran Ulmer, Chair, U.S. Arctic Research Commission
  • Rear Admiral Daniel B. Abel, Commander, 17th Coast Guard District
  • Edward Itta, U.S. Arctic Research Commission, former Mayor of the North Slope Borough of Alaska, former President of the Barrow Whaling Captains Association and the Inuit Circumpolar Council – Alaska
  • Brigadier General Guy Hamel, Royal Canadian Air Force, Deputy Director, Strategy, Policy and Plans, North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) and United States Northern Command (USNORTHCOM)
  • Representative Bob Herron, Co-Chair, Alaska Arctic Policy Commission, Alaska
  • Mikå Mered, Managing Partner, POLARISK Group – London
  • Marilyn Heiman, Director, U.S. Arctic Program, The Pew Charitable Trusts
  • Brendan Kelly, Chief Scientist, Monterey Bay Aquarium, former Assistant Director for Polar Sciences, The White House
  • Rick Fox, President & General Manager, Edison Chouest Offshore
  • Senator Lesil McGuire, Co-Chair, Alaska Arctic Policy Commission, Alaska State Legislature
  • Dr. Lawson Brigham, Distinguished Professor of Geography & Arctic Policy, University of Alaska Fairbanks; and Fellow, U.S. Coast Guard Academy Center for Arctic Studies & Policy
  • Mead Treadwell, Owner, Treadwell Development; Lieutenant Governor of Alaska, 2010-2014; Advisor and Former Chair, U.S. Arctic Research Commission
  • Adrianna Muir, Ph.D., Deputy Senior Arctic Official, U.S. Department of State
  • Alice Rogoff, Publisher, Alaska Dispatch News; Co-Founder, The Arctic Circle
  • Dr. James Kendall, Regional Director, Alaska OCS Region, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management
  • Michael K. Young, President, The University of Washington
  • Kellye Testy, Dean, UW School of Law
  • Craig H. Allen Sr., Judson Falknor Professor of Law; Director, UW Arctic Law & Policy Institute
  • Reggie Joule, Mayor, The Northwest Arctic Borough
  • Rachel Kallander, Founder & Executive Director, Arctic Encounter Symposium; Manager, Kallander & Associates LLC
  • John Iani, Partner, Perkins Coie LLP
  • Chris Gregorich, Chief of Staff, The Office of Mayor Murray, City of Seattle
  • Steve Wackowski, Operations Manager, Tulugaq, LLC
  • Captain John Reeves, USCG Cutter HEALY

Feb. 4: Panel on the Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act

The Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act (PTFA), which offered important protections to tenants in  residential property subject to foreclosure, expired at the end of 2014. Housing advocates are invited to join us for a free webinar to discuss strategies to protect tenants post-PTFA. Five panelists, including Jeremy Bergstrom of the Shriver Center, Kent Qian of the National Housing Law Project, Tristia Bauman of the National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty, Matt Hill of the Public Justice Center, and Linda Couch of the National Low Income Housing Coalition, will discuss the implications of the PTFA’s expiration and state initiatives to pass similar protections.Feb. 4: Panel about the Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act

Upcoming Events on the Law, Race, Human Rights and Justice

May 28: Webinar: CCR, CRR & USHRN Present “Defending the Defenders”

Webinar

Wednesday, May 28, 2014
2:00 – 3:00 PM EST

The Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR) and Center for Reproductive Rights (CRR), in collaboration with the US Human Rights Network (USHRN) are hosting a webinar this coming Wednesday, May 28th at 2 pm EST on human rights defenders in the United States. Please join us to learn about how we can use the human rights framework to protect ourselves and our work, hear from others who have successfully engaged in human rights defenders advocacy, and to get details on how you can join a new USHRN human rights defenders member-initiated action team!

Speakers:

  • Ejim Dike, Executive Director of the U.S. Human Rights Network
  • Sunita PatelStaff Attorney at Center for Constitutional Rights
  • Karla Torres, Human Rights Fellow at Center for Reproductive Rights
  • Ahmad Abuznaid, Legal and Policy Director at Dream Defenders
  • Reena Shah, Director of Human Rights Project at Maryland Legal Aid

Click here to register.

May 29: Senator Elizabeth Warren Reading of A Fighting Chance: Elizabeth Warren by Henry Holt

Elizabeth Warren Book Cover

Thursday, May 29, 2014
7:00 PM
University Temple United Methodist Church Chapel, 1415 NE 43rd Street

In her first year as senior senator of Massachusetts, Senator Elizabeth Warren has become a liberal political hero and a lively, say-it-like-it-is star of what might otherwise be a dull Senate floor. This spring, you can hear Warren speak yourself as she presents her new memoir about her journey from small-town Oklahoma to the political chambers of Washington, D.C. that is as passionate, funny and rabble rousing as Warren herself. Join us for an evening with the Senator, and if rumors turn out to be true, you might even be able to say you met a future presidential frontrunner.

Tickets are $32.76 and available from Brown Paper Tickets. Each ticket admits one person and includes a copy of A Fighting Chance.

Click here for more information.

May 29: Tele-Conference – Combating Violence Against Women: What’s Working?

ABA section of internat law

Thursday, May 29, 2014
11:00 AM – 12:30 PM EDT
By Teleconference Only

A FREE non-CLE teleconference proudly presented by ABA Section of International Law International Human Rights Committee; Asia/Pacific Committee; India Committee; NGO & Not-For-Profit Organizations Committee; Women’s Interest Network (WIN) and IMPOWR

Recent horrific and highly publicized attacks against women, international advocacy to combat sex trafficking, and efforts to pass I-VAWA and other legislation have heightened awareness about the global epidemic of violence against women. Less well-know are the various innovative and practical strategies and approaches around the globe that have significantly increased prosecutions and convictions of offenders, empowered women to vindicate their right to be free from violence, and otherwise improved the safety and security of women. This teleconference will highlight best practices throughout the world to combat violence against women, including: mobile courts to enhance access to justice for victims in rural areas; coordinated response centers for victims of sexual violence; and, specialized units training of judges, police officers, prosecutors and local leaders/elders to educate them about gender violence and to ensure effective and timely investigations, prosecutions and convictions. Speakers will include representatives from advocacy groups operating in various regions of the world and judges/law enforcement personnel involved in developing/implementing these approaches.

Moderator: 

  • Elizabeth Brundige, Executive Director, Avon Global Center for Women and Justice at Cornell Law School

Speakers:

  • Justice Elena Highton de Nolasco, Vice President of the Supreme Court of Argentina and founder of the Supreme Court’s Domestic Violence Office
  • Maimbo Ziela,National Coordinator of WLSA-Zambia
  • Smriti Minocha, Senior Program Officer, Human Rights Law Network, New Delhi, India

Please RSVP to Jonathan Lewis at jonathan.lewis@americanbar.org.

Email questions to: inthumrights@gmail.com or tweet us @ABAIHRC or use the hashtag #ABAIHRC

June 9: Discussion on Perceptions of Justice

Equal Justice

Monday, June 9, 2014
8:45 AM – 12:00 PM
*Registration opens at 8:30 AM
OB2 Auditorium DSHS, 1115 Washington Street SE, Olympia, WA

Sponsored by: The Washington State Minority and Justice Commission

Prosecutors, police representatives, judges, defense counsel, and representatives of community organizations will be present for this discussion.  There will be an opportunity to ask questions during the presentations and for informal conversations during the lunch hour.

Speakers:

  • Don Stemen, Measures for Justice
  • Mark Peffley, John, Hurwitz, and Jeffrey Mondak, Researchers

No Cost to Register ~ Lunch provided.

Advance registration is recommended. Register by emailing: cynthia.delostrinos@courts.wa.gov with “Perceptions of Justice” in the subject line.

*3 general CLE credits approved.

June 20: Save the Date for Negotiating Justice: Advancing Racial Equity and Client Goals

equity

Friday, June 20, 2014
8:45 AM – 5:00 PM
Gates Hall, RM 138

One of the most challenging skills that an attorney can conquer is learning to humanize their client and translating that practice into a successful negotiation of their client’s case. This CLE will focus on how to improve your awareness of the obstacles that our clients face in their lives. You will learn how to negotiate your cases in a way that uses this understanding.

Speakers include:

  • John A. Powell, Berkeley Law, an internationally recognized expert in civil rights, civil liberties and structural racism, ethnicity, housing, poverty and democracy.
  • Judge Robert S. Lasnik , U.S. District Court for the Western District of Washington, who recently decided the landmark Wilber v. Mount Vernon case concerning meaningful representation of indigent clients.

Sponsored by the University of Washington Law School, the Washington Defender Association, Columbia Legal Services, ACLU-WA, Northwest Justice Project, TeamChild and Center for Children & Youth Justice.

CLE credits pending. This program is free nad open to WDA members, civil legal service attorneys, attorneys in private practice who handle pro bono cases and law students.

Advance registration is required. Please email wda@defensenet.org or fax (206) 623-5420 with the following information:
-Name ______________
-Bar Number ______________
-Are You a WDA Member? Yes ______ No _______
-I may want to join WDA – please send info. ______
-Email: ______________________
-Employer/Organization: ____________________
-Phone: _________________________________