Summer opportunities with UN Women; AGO Civil Rights Unit hiring externs; post-grad fellowship with Columbia Legal Services

Nov. 25: United Nations Women – Migration Internship

UN womenApplication Deadline: Friday, Nov. 25, 2016

UN Women, grounded in the vision of equality enshrined in the Charter of the United Nations, works for the elimination of discrimination against women and girls; the empowerment of women; and the achievement of equality between women and men as partners and beneficiaries of development, human rights, humanitarian action and peace and security.

Women’s economic empowerment, including the empowerment of migrant women and girls, is one of the priority areas of UN Women, as reflected in the organization’s Strategic Plan 2013-2017. The Migration Portfolio forms part of the Economic Empowerment Section of the Policy Division at UN Women Headquarters in New York. In 2016, the Migration Team’s work-streams have included: Coordinating UN Women’s chairing of the Global Migration Group (GMG) in 2016; Managing the implementation of UN Women’s EU-funded project on “Promoting and Protecting Women Migrant Workers’ Labour and Human Rights: Engaging with International and National Human Rights Mechanisms to enhance Accountability” due to be finalised in early 2017; Supporting the UN system, requesting Member States and other relevant entities to develop gender-responsive approaches to migration that promote gender equality and the empowerment of migrant women and girls. Read more about the migration internship here.

Application Process: Apply here.

Nov. 30: UN Women – Women, Peace and Security Intern 

UN womenApplication Deadline: Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016

The Peace and Security Section leads on UN system-wide coordination on Women, Peace and Security, provides technical and financial support to the peace and security work of UN Women field offices, and implements a number of global initiatives that range from training women on mediation, peacekeepers on preventing and responding to sexual violence, and experts on investigation and documentation of international crimes, to rapidly deploying gender advisors to commissions of inquiry, peace talks, and post-conflict planning and financing processes, supporting gender-responsive public service delivery, and linking women in the community and grassroots organizations to police and other actors to ensure better protection. Read more here.

Application Process: Apply here.

Nov. 30: SEIU Fight for $15 one-year legal fellowship

seiuApplication Deadline: Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016

The Legal Department of the Service Employees International Union will have an opening for a law fellow in Washington, D.C., starting in September 2017. The SEIU Law Fellowship Program was established to introduce recent law graduates to a broad range of legal work within an international union, and offers an excellent opportunity for new lawyers to work with experienced union-side lawyers on a variety of cutting-edge issues related to the advancement of workers’ interests.

The 2017 Fight for $15 Law Fellow will provide legal support for SEIU’s campaign in support of the Fight for $15 movement. The Fellow will also have the opportunity to be involved in many areas of the legal department’s work. While each fellowship experience varies according to the work of the department, the Fellow can expect to be involved in at least some of the following types of work: litigation to enforce the labor and employment rights of union members; handling matters before the National Labor Relations Board; drafting amicus briefs in support of workers’ rights issues before the NLRB and appellate courts; advice and assistance to staff organizers on organizing campaigns; involvement in policy and legislative initiatives; and participation in SEIU’s political program. Read more here.

Application Process: Application instructions here.

Dec. 1: Paid internship at public interest firm

Spiegel & McDiarmid LogoApplication Deadline: Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016

The Spiegal Summer Program is designated to introduce law degree candidates or recipients to the firm’s practice areas (Electric, Gas, Environment and Energy, Hydro and Water, Telecommunications, Transportation, Utility Workforce, Public Policy and Lobbying, Litigation and Appeals, Compliance and Enforcement, and Contracts and Rate Negotiations), our approach to quality legal representation, and our culture. Summer Associates are intricately involved with the firm’s cases and fully utilize their skills in our challenging work environment.

Application Process: Please send resume and cover letter to recruiting@spiegelmcd.com

Dec. 1: Post-grad opportunities with the Presidential Management Fellows Program

PMF Logo1Application Deadline: Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016

Since  1977 the PMF Program has matched outstanding graduate students with exciting Federal opportunities. The PMF Program is a great leadership training ground. You’ll perform valuable service to the American people while jump-starting your career, whatever you envision that to be. You’ll get full salary and benefits as well as challenging assignments, training, mentoring, plus an opportunity to make government work better. Find out more.

Application Process: Apply here.

Dec. 9: Children’s Law Center hiring summer intern

Children's Law Center LogoApplication Deadline: Friday, Dec. 9, 2016

Children’s Law Center fights so every child in DC can grow up with a loving family, good health and a quality education. Judges, pediatricians and families turn to us to be the voice for children who are abused or neglected, who aren’t learning in school, or who have health problems that can’t be solved by medicine alone. With 100 staff and hundreds of pro bono lawyers, we reach 1 out of every 8 children in DC’s poorest neighborhoods – more than 5,000 children and families each year. And, we multiply this impact by advocating for city-wide solutions that benefit all children. Visit www.childrenslawcenter.org to learn more about the organization, and click here to read the internship posting.

Job Description Children’s Law Center invites applications for summer 2017 law clerk internships to begin Tuesday, May 30, 2017. Law clerks have a wide variety of responsibilities including conducting client intakes, completing court runs, researching and writing about legal issues, interviewing clients and witnesses, locating resources for clients, attending court hearings, and accompanying attorneys on home and school visits.

Application Process: No telephone calls, please. Submit a resume, writing sample, references, and cover letter. It is mandatory for each applicant to explicitly rank his or her project preferences on a scale of 1 through 5 in their cover letter, with “1” designating an applicant’s first choice and “5” designating an applicant’s last choice. Children’s Law Center’s hiring committee may elect not to review applications which fail to designate the applicant’s project preferences in the manner requested.

Dec. 11: AGO, Civil Rights Unit hiring winter and spring externs

washington-ago-color-sealApplication Deadline: Sunday, Dec. 11, 2016

The Attorney General’s Wing Luke Civil Rights Unit works to protect the civil rights of everyone in Washington.  The Attorney General enforces state and federal laws, including laws prohibiting discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, pregnancy, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, marital status, status as a family with children, honorably discharged veteran or military status, status as a breastfeeding mother, the presence of any sensory, mental, or physical disability, or the use of a trained dog guide or service animal. Read more here.

The Civil Rights Unit in Seattle has an excellent opportunity for a second or third-year law student seeking an externship beginning in January and ending in May, the Civil Rights Unit also understands UW is on the quarter system and will work on start/end dates that work for all. The position would involve assisting with the investigation of civil rights complaints, conducting legal research on civil rights laws in Washington state, drafting written discovery as necessary and other duties as assigned.

Application Process: Apply here.

Dec. 15: Summer internship with the Urban Justice Center, Mental Health Project

Urban Justice Center NYCApplication Deadline: Thursday, Dec. 15, 2016

The Mental Health Project of the Urban Justice Center is a team of attorneys, social workers, and advocates dedicated to enforcing the rights of low-income New Yorkers with mental illness. We represent individual clients, bring class action lawsuits and engage in community education with the belief that low-income people with mental illness are entitled to live stable and full lives, free from discrimination.

Students will have the opportunity to engage in substantive legal work, including interviewing clients, representing clients in court and at administrative hearings, researching and writing briefs, and working on class action lawsuits and systemic reform.

Application Process: Apply here.

Rolling deadline, paid: Columbia Legal Services Elder Law Fellowship now accepting applications

columbia20legal20servicesApplication Deadline: Open until filled, first round of applications considered by Nov. 21

For many years, Columbia Legal Services has represented some of the most marginalized people in our community. We use every legal tool available on their behalf. Our role to serve people and use advocacy that might otherwise not be available makes our work an integral part of the Washington Alliance for Equal Justice. As a proud member of the Alliance, our vision of justice is when people have the necessary tools and opportunity to achieve social and economic justice, a more equitable and inclusive society is possible. Through large-scale litigation, policy reform, and innovative partnerships, our lawyers and staff work in furtherance of our mission. The ideal candidate for any position at Columbia Legal Services will be able to articulate their role in the achievement of that vision.

Columbia Legal Services seeks a one-year Elder Law Fellow to support its practice on behalf of low-income clients and to advance systemic reform. Areas of practice on behalf of seniors will include public benefits, guardianship, housing, and access to medical or mental health services. A willingness and ability to learn these areas is critical to success. Read more about the fellowship here.

Application Process: Read about the application process here.

Rolling deadline, paid: Laurel Rubin Farmworker Justice Project

nw-justice-projectApplication Deadline: Open until filled

The Northwest Justice Project Farmworker Unit seeks summer interns to assist experienced attorneys in serving migrant farm workers through farm labor camp outreach, community education and legal work. Law student outreach is an essential component in helping workers in their efforts to enforce their labor rights and obtain access to needed services.

Law students will work with attorneys on ongoing cases and projects, including farmworker sexual harassment cases and community education, pesticide safety, wage theft, and advocacy related to the H-2A temporary visa program for farmworkers. Northwest Justice Project is the LSC funded staffed Legal Services program for Washington State. The positions are focused full –time on farmworker advocacy. Read more here.

Application Process: Application instructions here.

New Study Finds Prosecutors Exclude Blacks Because All-White Juries More Likely to Convict

Jury of Your Peers? Study Finds Prosecutors Exclude Blacks Because All-White Juries Are More Likely to Convict, Support Death Penalty

All White Jury Photo

By Manny Otiko | Atlanta Blackstar (Photo credit: Atlanta Blackstar)

According to The New York Times, a study of the Caddo Parish, Louisiana, court system has revealed prosecutors often exclude Blacks from jury trials so they can tip the scales of justice in their favor. The article, written by Adam Liptak, also said prosecutors preferred to have all-white juries because Black jurors reduced their conviction rate.

“No defendants were acquitted when two or fewer of the dozen jurors were black. When there were at least three black jurors, the acquittal rate was 12 percent,” Liptak said. “With five or more, the rate rose to 19 percent. Defendants in all three groups were overwhelmingly black.”

Continue reading here.

Inmates With Mental Illness Tell Their Stories Through the AVID Jail Project

By Kim Mosolf | Rooted in Rights (Video credit: AVID Jail Project)

The AVID Jail Project of Disability Rights Washington works on behalf of inmates with mental illness in several local jails. As Washington’s protection and advocacy agency, Disability Rights Washington is in a unique position to bring recording equipment into jails to capture and share the experiences of people with disabilities. Most members of the public will never enter a jail or have firsthand knowledge of how inmates with mental illness fare inside our jails. This video is a result of our ongoing efforts to give jail inmates with mental illness an opportunity to tell their own stories in their own words.

ORAM Publishes Report Amidst Debates on Uganda’s Possible Re-Introduction of the Anti-Homosexuality Bill

Disability Rights Washington Seeks Mental Health Advisory Council Members

DRW

Disability Rights Washington (DRW) is a private non-profit organization that protects the rights of people with disabilities statewide. Our mission is to advance the dignity, equality, and self-determination of people with disabilities. We work to pursue justice on matters related to human and legal rights.

Volunteers who serve on our Board and councils are critical to our work. We are reaching out to encourage people to serve on our Mental Health Advisory Council.

For more about the role of the MHAC, click here. 

Missed the Careers in Public Policy Panel on October 29th? Podcast Link Available Now!

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Did you miss the panel on October 29th about Careers in Public Policy?  Here’s your chance to watch the podcast.

Click here to download the materials.

Maryland Poor Deserve Free Attorneys in Family Law Cases, Panel Finds

Maryland

By: Madeleine List, Southern Maryland Online

“[A] state task force this month recommended assigning free lawyers in certain family-law cases, and spending nearly $8 million over four years to help the poorest Marylanders work through the complex court system.” “The Task Force to Study Implementing a Civil Right to Counsel in Maryland is a group of judges, attorneys, delegates and state senators that has been meeting since December to discuss the benefits of providing legal representation to low-income people involved in civil disputes.” “A bill, sponsored by Del. Sandy Rosenberg, D-Baltimore, outlining the task force’s recommendations, will be introduced to the legislature at the start of the next session, which begins on Jan. 14, said Dumais, who plans to co-sponsor the bill.”

Continue reading here.

As Uganda Debates the Re-Introduction of an Anti-Homosexuality Bill, ORAM Publishes a Comprehensive Country of Origin Report on the Conditions of LGBTI Individuals in the Country

ORAM Country of Origin Report - Uganda

By: ORAM International

ORAM has published an extensive report titled “Country of Origin Report: Sexual and Gender Minorities – Uganda.” The unique report includes an extensive case law section, analyzing key asylum decisions in Ugandan LGBTI asylum cases from six jurisdictions worldwide.

This report is particularly timely. Ugandan LGBTI individuals and activists recount growing hostility and fear as Uganda debates re-introducing an “Anti-Homosexuality Bill,” while homosexuality remains criminalized under existing law. The Anti-Homosexuality Act, initially dubbed the ” Kill the Gays Bill,” was annulled by Uganda’s Constitutional Court in August 2014 on a parliamentary technicality. The Act imposed up to life imprisonment for same-sex sexual acts, and punished those who advocate for sexual minority rights or provide services to LGBTI people. Violence toward LGBTI individuals in Uganda has escalated, and many are fleeing the country.

Country of Origin reports are a critical tool for adjudicators and protection experts assessing risk of persecution, credibility, and availability of state protection in asylum and refugee claims. Building on its expertise and its deep understanding of the refugee field, ORAM demonstrates through this report that a nuanced and culturally-informed approach to sexual orientation and gender identity (SOGI) in Country of Origin Information (COI) will lead to more accurate adjudication of LGBTI asylum and refugee claims.

Download the full report here.

 

Fulbright-Clinton Fellowship Applications Due Tomorrow! Apply Now!

2015-2016 Fulbright-Clinton Fellowship Applications Due Tomorrow!

Fulbright Logo

The J. William Fulbright-Hillary Rodham Clinton (Fulbright-Clinton) Fellowship is a component of the Fulbright U.S. Student Program. Fulbright-Clinton Fellows serve in professional placements as special assistants in foreign government ministries or institutions and gain hands-on public sector experience in participating foreign countries while simultaneously carrying out an academic research/study project.

2015-16 Fulbright-Clinton Fellows are being hosted by the African Union, Bangladesh, Burma, Cote d’Ivoire, Haiti, Kazakhstan, Kosovo, Malawi, Nepal, Peru, Timor-Leste, and Samoa.

For a complete description and application details, click here.

21 Progress Seeking Executive Director, Due 10/15

21 Progress Logo

We are seeking a dynamic, progressive leader who has a passion for social justice and a commitment to building a new generation of leaders. The successful candidate should see this work as a calling rather than a job. 21 PROGRESS is a 501(c)3 organization founded in 2012 and seeded with start up funds from UFCW 21, the largest private sector union in Washington. 21 PROGRESS works to increase the number and expertise of new progressive leaders through leadership development programs in civic engagement, economic justice, arts & culture, and everyday economics. These programs serve DREAMers, New Americans and other low wage workers, their families and communities. 21 PROGRESS operates with a small core staff of four, a $400,000 annual operating budget and diverse programming partners throughout the community. The Executive Director reports to the Board of Directors.

For a complete job description and application details, click here.

Georgetown Law’s Women’s Law and Public Policy Fellowship, Due 10/17

GeorgetownThe Women’s Law and Public Policy Fellowship Program (WLPPFP) offers Fellowships for public interest lawyers from the United States who are committed to advancing women’s rights throughout their careers.  Throughout the Fellowship year, participants gain invaluable experience by working on women’s issues in Washington, D.C. with a public interest organization or governmental agency and by participating in educational and professional development opportunities organized by WLPPFP.

The Fellowships are determined each year based upon several factors, including the interests of the top Fellowship candidates, the potential placement organizations and the donors supporting the Fellowships.  Since the establishment of the Program, WLPPFP has been fortunate to be able to place a Women’s Law Fellow each year with the Georgetown University Law Center Domestic Violence Clinic, the National Partnership for Women and Families, and the National Women’s Law Center – three preeminent women’s rights entities in Washington, DC.

For a complete description and application details, click here.

Carey & Lillevik, PLLC Seeking Associate Attorney in Seattle

CareyLillevik

A position has opened at Carey & Lillevik for an associate attorney. The firm would like to hire an associate attorney on or before October 20th.

Carey & Lillevik’s practice areas include child protection services/CPS, juvenile crime, criminal defense, divorce, family law, education law, and estate planning. Partners Ann Carey and Linda Lillevik founded the firm on the premise that deep commitment to clients and a comprehensive understanding of the law are essential components to successful client outcomes.

For more information about the firm, click here.  

To apply, please submit your resume, cover letter, references and brief writing sample to Ann Carey and Linda Lillevik.

Attention 2Ls! Paid Summer Internship with Southern Poverty Law Center in Jackson, Mississippi, Due 10/25

SPLCThe Southern Poverty Law Center offers summer internships to exceptional second-year law students who possess strong academic backgrounds, excellent research and writing skills, and a commitment to public interest law. SPLC’s Jackson, MS office uses public policy advocacy, legal representation, and community organizing to ensure that juvenile justice, educational and mental health system results in positive outcomes for families, children, and communities.

Summer interns assist SPLC’s attorneys and advocates with significant legal research and writing, field investigations, client interviews in correctional and mental health facilities, outreach, and public policy advocacy.

For a complete job description and application details, click here.

Attention 1Ls! Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) in DC Offering Paid Internships, Due 1/16/15

NRDC Logo

NRDC is a leading nonprofit membership organization that has been marshaling science and the law to protect the environment and public health since 1970. NRDC’s experts pursue cutting-edge litigation, sophisticated lobbying, hard-hitting scientific research, and broad-reaching public education.

NRDC’s summer legal interns may participate in writing briefs, drafting complaints, preparing legal analyses, obtaining affidavits, investigating violations of environmental laws, developing policy advocacy campaigns, and drafting white papers and comments for submission to Congressional committees and administrative agencies. NRDC hires passionate students who possess the intelligence, skill, self-confidence, and maturity to take on enormous responsibility. Our interns play an active role on the frontlines of the environmental movement. Over the course of a summer, an NRDC intern will typically work on a variety of projects and amass experience that he or she could not obtain anywhere else.

Washington State Pro Bono Council Offering 2014-2015 Access to Justice Policy Internship, Open Until Filled

WA State Pro Bono Council

Volunteer lawyer programs (VLPs) in Washington State have a unique and complex history. Each of the 18 current VLPs evolved in its own way. Several VLPs started as projects of local bar associations, while others were started by groups of attorneys responding to the need in their community. Some programs became stand-alone nonprofit corporations, others became part of community action centers, and three programs remain part of their local bar associations. The local nature of the VLPs is both a challenge and strength.

In response to these realities, the Pro Bono Subcommittee of the Access to Justice Board’s Delivery Systems Committee proposed that a Statewide Pro Bono Council (PBC) be formed to unify and address the needs of Washington’s VLPs – the proposal was adopted in July 2013 and launched in January 2014. The PBC is situated as a committee of the Access to Justice Board.  The PBC welcomes the participation of a law student as an ATJ intern.

The student will be invited to attend PBC meetings, shadow VLP clinics and projects, and be able to work on discrete projects related to the effective delivery of pro bono services in Washington, including one major research project. The nature and scope of these projects will be determined by the PBC, the Manager, and the student as the relationship develops. The research project will involve investigation and analysis of the systemic delivery of legal aid across the state.

For a complete job description and application details, click here.

Washington Supreme Court Seeking Externs in Winter, Spring, and Summer Quarters – Work with Justice Gonzalez

J. Gonzalez

Justice González is an associate justice of the Washington State Supreme Court, the highest state appellate court.  His externs work under the close supervision of his lead law clerk, Laura Anglin. Externs will review and draft memoranda to the court analyzing and recommending the proper disposition of motions and state habeas corpus (personal restraint) petitions. They will review and make recommendations on bench memos, opinions, and attorney discipline matters. They may assist in the preparation of speeches, CLE materials, rules, and opinions. Externs must be able to both work independently, and work closely with a team, and learn from vigorous copy editing. Considerable research and writing is required.

For a complete job description and application details, click herePhoto credit: Washington Courts.

Southern Poverty Law Center Seeking Staff Attorney for Economic Justice Project in Montgomery, Alabama

SPLC

The Southern Poverty Law Center seeks an attorney to join the Economic Justice Project in its Montgomery, Alabama office. The Southern Poverty Law Center is dedicated to fighting hate and bigotry, and to seeking justice for the most vulnerable members of our society. Our Economic Justice Project seeks to address the systems, both public and private, that keep people trapped in poverty. Past and present areas of focus have been predatory payday and car title lending, the criminalization of poverty and related barriers the criminal justice system creates for persons to escape poverty, modern debtors’ prisons, access to public benefits and more. The practice group is based in Montgomery, Alabama but works across the Southeast United States. The practice group was formed in 2012, and is growing significantly to expand its work. The practice group is headed by a Deputy Legal Director who oversees this and another practice group, and has two full-time attorneys, one part-time attorney, and a researcher/advocate; the practice group is in the process of hiring a second researcher/advocate.

For a complete job description and application details, click here.

Human Rights Gaining New Advances Through Technology

Using Geospatial Technologies to Support Human Rights Research and Documentation

AAAS Logo

Human rights organizations are increasingly using scientific evidence-gathering techniques to support and strengthen their work. In this workshop, experts in remote sensing and geographic technologies from the AAAS Geospatial Technologies and Human Rights Project will present the opportunities provided by these technologies  (e.g., remote sensing, geographic information systems (GIS), and GPS), and how they may be used in human rights research and documentation efforts. Workshop participants will develop an understanding of the technologies, how they can affordably incorporate them into their own work, ways the technologies have been used and may be exploited in the future, as well as competencies that will enable them to identify misuse of the technology.

To participate in the live-stream online on September 5, 2014 at 9:00 AM EST, register here.

Suit Claims Franklin County Inmates Face Barbaric Practices

CLS Logo

By: Tyler Richardson, Tri-City Herald reposted in the Seattle Times

Inmates at the Franklin County jail are routinely subjected to inhumane and barbaric practices, according to a lawsuit filed by a Seattle-based legal-aid organization.

Mentally ill inmates are chained to a fence for days, pepper-sprayed without reason, left unsupervised in restraint chairs and forced into isolation, the lawsuit claims.

Their mental health is also ignored, said the suit filed in U.S. District Court.

In one case, a man with apparent mental-health issues allegedly bit off two of his fingers after he was repeatedly shackled to a fence inside the booking area. When he returned from the hospital after biting off the second finger, he was chained again to the fence.

Melissa Lee, an attorney for Columbia Legal Services, described conditions at the newly remodeled jail as some of the worst of more than 20 county jails the organization has examined statewide.

Continue reading here.

 

Working in DC this Summer? Consider Learning More About Law & Policy Making

Disability Rights Washington (DRW) Releases Documentary about the WSBA’s “Questions of Discrimination”

By Gillian Maguire, Disability Rights Washington

Disability Rights Washington’s video “Questions of Discrimination” criticizes the Washington State Bar Association (WSBA) exam questions that single out applicants with mental health disabilities and ask for treatment records.

In Washington, as in many other states, several bar application questions and rules call into question an individual’s “character and fitness” to practice law if they have a mental health disability.

According to several law students and attorneys, applicants struggle in answering these questions because they feel forced to choose between their rights to privacy and freedom from discrimination, and their ability to practice their chosen profession.

“WSBA asks a question that’s trying to identify whether or not a lawyer is going to be a problem from a character standpoint. They take kind of a wholesale question like, ‘have you ever been treated for mental health’, that has a built-in assumption that anybody who has ever seen a therapist has a character flaw that might be a problem with them being an attorney. And that’s not borne out by science,” says Andy Imparato, Executive Director of the national Association of University Centers on Disabilities.

Continue reading here.

Duke Law Offering 2014 Summer Institute on Law & Policy in Washington, DC

Duke Law DC Summer Institute

Working in Washington? Put the Duke Law D.C. Summer Institute on Law and Policy on your agenda: A great way to learn law applicable to your policy area of expertise — without ever leaving Washington.

Course offerings in the 2014 Duke Law D.C. Summer Institute on Law and Policy focus on topics important to current and aspiring practitioners in fields that require mastery of constitutional, statutory, and regulatory law and policymaking. The two sessions this summer are July 7-17, 2014, and July 21-July 31, 2014.  Each course is designed to provide an accessible introduction to the pertinent legal and policy subject matter. Those living and working in Washington who are potentially interested in attending law school, or who otherwise seek greater familiarity with the legal framework in a particular field, are especially encouraged to enroll.

In each two-week session, classes will be held Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday evenings from either5:45-7:15 p.m. or 7:30-9:00 p.m., at the Duke in Washington office located near Metro Center at 1201 New York Ave., NW, Suite 1110, in Washington.Wednesday evenings are reserved for special programs, including events with Judge Patricia Millett on July 23, and with Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg onJuly 30. Participants in either or both sessions are invited to attend all of the Wednesday night events.

To enroll, click here.

Asian Pacific American Legal Groups Urge Chicago Officials to Investigate Anti-Asian and Anti-Immigrant Video Incident

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By Tina Matsuoka, National Asian Pacific American Bar Association

WASHINGTON — The National Asian Pacific American Bar Association (NAPABA) and its Chicago-based affiliates — the Asian American Bar Association of Greater Chicago (AABA), Chinese American Bar Association of Greater Chicago (CABA), and Korean American Bar Association of Chicago (KABA) — along with the Filipino American Lawyers Association of Chicago (FALA) and the Indian-American Bar Association of Chicago (IABA) express concern over the actions of certain Chicago police officers captured by recently-released video surveillance, which depicts officers using racist and anti-immigrant language during an arrest last summer.

“The actions shown in the video raise questions about how people of color and immigrants, particularly those who are limited English proficient, are treated by Chicago police officers,” said Bill Simonitsch, president of NAPABA. “We urge Mayor Emanuel and Chicago Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy to fully investigate this incident and work with the local Asian Pacific American community to ensure that immigrants and all people of color feel protected by local law enforcement officials.”

According to a lawsuit filed in federal court on May 14, 2014, Chicago police officers verbally harassed and physically abused a Chinese American spa manager during a raid on a local business in July 2013. The security video shows officers entering the spa, apprehending the woman and striking her while she was kneeling and handcuffed. Police officers can be heard on the video making racist and anti-immigrant remarks during the arrest. One officer refused to believe that the woman was an American citizen and told her “You’re not f—— American! I’ll put you in a UPS box and send you back to wherever the f— you came from.”

NAPABA, AABA, CABA, KABA, FALA, and IABA urge the City of Chicago and the Chicago Police Department to fully investigate the specific allegations raised by the video, determine whether any systemic problems of official misconduct exist, and take appropriate action to ensure that all visitors and residents, regardless of gender, race, national origin, immigration status, or English proficiency, feel welcome and safe in the City of Chicago.