Local organizations hiring students for summer externships

Due May 1: Northwest Justice Project hiring Labor Trafficking Attorney

Application Deadline: Monday, May 1, 2017

The Northwest Justice Project (NJP) seeks applications from qualified attorneys to address labor trafficking in agriculture in collaboration with our Farm Worker Unit (FWU). The FWU is based in Yakima and provides legal assistance to low-income agricultural workers throughout Washington. This position is funded by a grant from the federal Office for Victims of Crime (VOCA) and Washington’s Office of Crime Victims Advocacy (OCVA) to serve individuals impacted by labor trafficking and to increase awareness of trafficking and appropriate services in vulnerable communities throughout Washington. This is a full-time position funded for three years.

Apply and learn more here.

Rolling Deadline: Seattle Community Law Center hiring summer and school-year externs

Application Deadline: Open until filled

overcome barriers to financial and medical stability. The Disabled Homeless Advocacy Project (DHAP) provides the accommodations, resources, and encouragement necessary to keep clients who are homeless engaged in their disability claim. DHAP delivers legal aid “in the field” at local shelters and sites accessible to the homeless population. The Social Security Advocacy Project (SSAP) helps clients who have a legal problem with disability benefits that they are already receiving.

Apply and learn more here.

Rolling Deadline: Thurston County Public Defense hiring summer externs

Application Deadline: Open until filled

Thurston County Public Defense (TCPD) gives legal representation to people who can’t afford a lawyer, in criminal and dependency cases in Thurston County District Court and Superior Court.

Apply and learn more here.

Rolling Deadline: Summer externship opportunities with the Washington State Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction-Equity and Civil Rights Office

Application Deadline: Open until filled

An extern would assist the Equity and Civil Rights Office and Legal Affairs Unit in providing support, information, and dispute resolution to help families and educators understand their rights and responsibilities. This will include: • Conducting legal research regarding civil rights issues affecting students and schools, including discrimination on the basis of sex, race, creed, religion, color, national origin, sexual orientation, gender expression, gender identity, and disability; • Drafting guidance materials, tools, and resources to assist schools and families understand their rights and responsibilities; • As needed, assisting with complaint investigations, analyzing potential discriminatory practices, and resolving concerns about discrimination by students, parents, employees, and others; and • Researching other legal issues that arise in the agency, such as public disclosure and allegations of unprofessional conduct by educators.

Apply and learn more here.

Rolling Deadline: Kids In Need of Defense hiring attorney in California

Application Deadline: Open until filled

Kids in Need of Defense (KIND) is an innovative partnership among the Microsoft Corporation, Angelina Jolie and other interested philanthropists, law firms and corporate supporters. As the leading national organization that works to ensure that no refugee or immigrant child faces immigration court alone, KIND is dedicated to providing direct and pro bono representation as well as positive systemic change in both law and policy to improve the protection of unaccompanied immigrant and refugee children. KIND also assists children who are returning to their home countries through deportation or voluntary departure to do so safely and to reintegrate into their home communities. In addition, we work to ensure the voices of these children are heard and we help them become their own advocates. Launched in fall 2008, KIND is headquartered in Washington, DC and has 10 field offices across the United States.

Apply and learn more here.

Rolling Deadline: American Immigration Council hiring staff attorney

Application Deadline: Open until filled

The Council’s legal department advocates for fundamental fairness in U.S. immigration law. It is staffed by experienced immigration lawyers who play a leading role in immigration litigation across the country.

Apply and learn more here

Pro Bono Opportunity – Bridging the Gap/Moderate Means Program, Due 10/19

Position: Volunteer Intern
Volunteers Needed: 2Ls, 3Ls, and LLMs; 1Ls (training now; volunteer work in January)
Time Commitment: 5 hours per week for the Fall and Winter Quarters (1 hour weekly staff meeting)
Location: William H. Gates Hall
Training: Training is provided in the substantive legal areas relevant to the program.
Application Deadline: October 19, 2015
Contact: Ann Spangler at spangler@uw.edu

Bridging the Gap provides legal referrals for low and moderate income individuals as a part of the WSBA Moderate Means Program.

Bridging the Gap is a UW Law in-house pro bono program. The goal of the program is to increase access to civil legal services for people of moderate means who cannot afford an attorney but make too much money to qualify for traditional free legal aid services. The program is focused in the areas of Family, Housing and Consumer law.

Law students serving as Bridging the Gap volunteer interns interview potential clients by telephone to collect information and evaluate their cases. Qualifying cases will be referred by interns to participating attorneys who have agreed to represent clients for a reduced fee. After completing training, Bridging the Gap interns will be expected to commit to a minimum of five hours a week for the duration of fall and winter quarters (one hour is a weekly staff meeting).

Benefits to students:

  • Hands-on experience interviewing clients;
  • Training in substantive legal issues, issue-spotting, interviewing skills and ethics;
  • Instruction on how to use the Legal Server database, which is used by most of the civil legal aid organizations in Washington State, and many other states;
  • Supervision and mentoring by experienced attorneys;
  • The satisfaction of helping low and moderate income individuals who otherwise might not receive any legal help at all;
  • Time spent volunteering for Bridging the Gap counts for recognition with the Pro Bono Honors Society.

Upper level students (2L, 3L and LLM) may participate in training for the program now (fall quarter) and begin interviewing clients in November. 1Ls can train now and begin interviewing clients in January.

To apply for the program, submit a letter of interest and resume to Ann Spangler at spangler@uw.edu by October 19, 2015.

The key to happiness is in this post (among other things)…

When Discretion Means Denial: A National Perspective on Criminal Records Barriers to Federally Subsidized Housing

Although the Department of Housing and Urban Development has given wide discretion to public housing authorities and federally subsidized project owners to admit low-income tenants with criminal records, many continue to deny housing to these individuals. Overly restrictive policies against people with criminal records can violate civil rights laws, increase homelessness, and otherwise impede a person’s chance to reintegrate into society.

A new report from the Shriver Center, When Discretion Means Denial: A National Perspective on Criminal Records Barriers to Federally Subsidized Housing, urges the Department of Housing and Urban Development to take active steps to eliminate barriers to housing for persons who have had contact with the criminal justice system.

Based on a review of over 300 written admissions policies from across the country, the report finds that the wide discretion given housing providers has resulted in broad screening criteria that deny individuals admission to housing for mere arrests and decades-old convictions, among other problems. The report identifies four areas where criminal records policies tend to be overly restrictive.

Learn more and download the report.

How laws around the world do and do not protect women from violence by David L. Richards & Jillienne Haglund

This article and accompanying photo is from The Washington Post’s Monkey Cage blog. 

In 1999, Jessica Lenahan-Gonzales’s estranged husband took her three girls in violation of a permanent restraining order requiring him to remain at least 100 yards from her and her children. The police of Castle Rock, Colo., failed to enforce the restraining order — after multiple requests — and the three girls were murdered by the estranged husband. A legal case against the police force reached the Supreme Court and, in a 7-to-2 decision, the court ruled that Castle Rock and its police could not be sued for failing to enforce a restraining order. In 2011, the case reached the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR), which found that the United States failed both to protect Lenahan and her daughters from domestic violence and to provide equal protection before the law. Further, said the IACHR, “all States have a legal obligation to protect women from domestic violence,” and this is “a problem widely recognized by the international community as a serious human rights violation and an extreme form of discrimination.”

Violence against women (VAW) is a pandemic, by any measure, and the repeated failures on the part of nations to provide meaningful recourse for victims of entrenched gender violence has led to growing calls by national and transnational actors alike for the adoption of stronger gender-violence legislation in all countries. Consequently, several important questions arise regarding the adoption and strength of domestic gender-violence laws, including:

[Continue reading here]

10th Annual Human Rights Institute – Human Rights Project at the Urban Justice Center (Co-sponsored by the US Human Rights Network)

May 7-9, 2015 | New York City

The Human Rights Project at the Urban Justice Center, in partnership with the US Human Rights Network, is pleased to announce that applications for its 10th annual Human Rights Institute (HRI) are currently available. The institute is a three-day professional development opportunity that promotes good governance and social change. It trains a select group of participants to strengthen their local efforts by using a human rights frame. Alumni become part of a nationwide community of advocates and have access to ongoing education, technical support and dialogue.

 Apply TodayScholarships are available to applicants with demonstrable need.

  • Scholarship Application Deadline – February 23, 2015
  • Regular Application Deadline – February 27, 2015

7 Essential Habits of Happier People (How Many Do You Possess?) by Jeff Haden

Happiness: everyone wants it, yet relatively few seem to get enough of it, especially those in their early forties. (That’s about the time many of us start thinking, “Is this all there is?”)

Maybe that’s because approximately 50% of your “happiness set-point” is determined by personality traits that are largely hereditary. In short, half of how happy you feel is basically outside your control. (Bummer.)

But that also means 50% of your level of happiness is totally within your control: relationships, health, career, etc. So even if you’re genetically disposed to be somewhat gloomy, you can still do things to make yourself a lot happier.

Like these:

1. Make good friends.

It’s easy to focus on building a professional network of partners, customers, employees, connections, etc, because there is (hopefully) a payoff.

But there’s a definite payoff to making real (not just professional or social media) friends. Increasing your number of friends correlates to higher subjective wellbeing. In terms of how happy you feel, doubling your number of friends is like increasing your income by 50%.

And if that’s not enough, people who don’t have strong social relationships are 50% less likely to survive at any given time than those who do. (That’s a scary thought for relative loners like me.)

Make friends outside of work. Make friends at work. Make friends everywhere.

But above all, make real friends. You’ll live a happier and longer life.

[Continue reading here]

Inmates re-entering society should not face lifetime barriers to work by Dan Satterberg & Brady Walkinshaw

Originally appeared as an “Opinion” piece in The Seattle Times

MORE than 7,000 people will finish their prison sentences and return to the community this year in Washington state. On the day of their release, each inmate is highly motivated never to return to prison, but more than half will be arrested within their first year back in the community. Why?

One reason is the hidden barriers that limit successful re-entry into our society. Former inmates don’t have access to many educational and job opportunities and are prohibited from applying for professional licenses that could lead to stable incomes.

Most of us are familiar with the direct consequences of committing a crime — jail or prison time, fines, community service, probation and treatment, but it’s the lesser-known indirect consequences that play a large part in why former inmates return to prison. These are known as “collateral consequences” because they have been imposed, not by judges or the criminal law, but by legislative bodies as additional hidden punishments.

While the terms of the sentence are measured in months or years, collateral consequences can last a lifetime. Is it fair to impose lifetime disabilities long after the debt has been paid to society? We don’t think so.

[Continue reading here]

Fill your heart with these public service opportunities this Valentine’s day

2/17: Social Justice Tuesday – “Caught in the Middle: Accessing legal service when you aren’t low income enough”

SJTJoin us in Room 127 at 12:30pm for this presentation about legal services that are available to people of “moderate means.” People who are very low income may be eligible for free legal aid. But for people just above those free legal aid eligibility guidelines, the options are practically nonexistent and yet these people who do not have sufficient income to pay market rates for a lawyer. Come hear from lawyers and students who have a found a way to bridge this justice gap.

 Panelists include: Celeste Miller (WSBA low bono section), Vincent Humphries (Moderate Means Program), and Lauren Matzelle (Bridging the Gap – student intern). If you would like lunch please RSVP via Symplicity or gatespsl@uw.edu RSVP by 12:00 pm Monday, February 16, 2015.

2/19: The Joint Legislative Audit and Review Committee (JLARC) Information Session

Please join us to learn more about the Joint Legislative Audit and ReviewCommittee (JLARC) in Room 118 at 12:30PM.  JLARC is a bipartisan and bicameral committee of the Washington State Legislature.  Nonpartisan JLARC staff evaluate the performance of state agencies and programs to make government more effective, efficient, and accountable.  One of JLARC’s long-term assignments is to review Washington’s tax preferences (e.g., exemptions, deductions, and credits).

 JLARC is seeking a qualified legal intern or extern for the summer of 2013 to perform legal research for the tax preference reviews, under the supervision of JLARC’s research attorneys and analysts.

 The intern will have an opportunity to: Gain in-depth knowledge of Washington State tax laws, policies, and history; assist the Citizen Commission for Performance Review of Tax Preferences; and make valuable professional contacts in state government.

Please RSVP via Symplicity or gatespsl@uw.edu

 2/19 – Deadline: Funding for UW Law Students is Available for: Citizen University National Conference!

Let’s rekindle citizenship in America! March 20 & 21, 2015. The events Friday, March 20 at 6:30pm will take place at Fisher Pavilion – Seattle Center.

This annual national conference is like no other civic gathering in America. Hundreds of change-makers, activists, and catalysts show up to learn about power, build their networks, and recharge their sense of purpose. They come from across the country, the political spectrum, and a wide range of domains — from immigrant rights to national service, voting reform to veteran re-integration, civic education to Hollywood and tech. They are you.

This is a time when citizens are solving problems in new ways, bypassing broken institutions, stale ideologies, and polarized politics. We are part of a movement to rekindle citizenship in America. We hope you’ll join us

Bring a water bottle, wear comfortable clothing and shoes, and learn how to practice powerful citizenship! http://www.citizenuniversity.us/conference/If you wish to attend send your request and resume to mestorms@uw.edu by February 19, 11:59 pm.

2/25: Immigration 101 – Training for Social Service Providers

This training is designed especially for individuals who work with and serve the immigrant community and who want to learn more about the immigration system, immigration enforcement, and how immigration issues affect the community! 

Topics to be addressed include: an overview of our immigration system and immigration status, how does the President’s new actions on immigration affect the community?, what barriers prevent immigrants from accessing services?, what happens when people are detained by immigration authorities?, what protections are available to immigrant victims of crime and survivors of domestic violence?, what protections are available for immigrant youth?, what resources are available in the community to help?, and more!

Note: This training is NOT intended for attorneys and CLE credit is not available.  The training is intended for social service providers in non-legal fields who want general information and resources to refer community members to qualified legal service providers. Join us on February 25 from 1:00-5:00 PM at New Holly Gathering Hall (7054 32nd Ave S., Seattle, WA, 98118).

A registration fee ($25) is required for this training, but scholarships are available (see the Register Now link for more details). We hope to see you there!  

Looking for a Chance to Work with Clients? Join UW Law’s In-House Bridging the Gap Program!

Free Legal Lunch Webcast on Sept. 30: Working With Clients With Disabilities

WSBA Lunchbox Series Image

Tuesday, Sept. 30, 2014
12:00 – 1:30 PM
Registration closes Monday, Sept. 29, 2014

Disability is the largest minority group in our society:

  • 27 percent of Washington households include a person with a disability.
  • 21 percent of adults in Washington have a mental illness.
  • 14 percent of people over 70 and 37 percent of people over 90 have dementia.

Given these statistics, no matter what kind of law you practice, you likely will have clients with disabilities. Disability can impact the attorney-client relationship in ways you may not have considered. Join the Director and Associate Director of Legal Advocacy for Disability Rights Washington to explore the ways in which we think and talk about disability and to apply those perspectives to real-life scenarios involving the Rules of Professional Conduct.

Who should attend? Anyone who wants to improve his or her representation of clients with intellectual disabilities, mental illness, dementia, brain injuries, or other disabilities.

WSBA webcasts are interactive. Bring your questions! Register online here.

In-House Pro Bono Opportunity at the UW! Check Out the Bridging the Gap/Moderate Means Program

Bridging the Gap Logo

Bridging the Gap provides legal referrals for low and moderate income individuals as a part of the WSBA Moderate Means Program.  Bridging the Gap is a UW Law in-house pro bono program. The goal of the program is to increase access to civil legal services for people of moderate means who cannot afford an attorney but make too much money to qualify for traditional free legal aid services.

Law student interns interview clients by telephone to help connect them to attorneys who will take their cases for reduced rates. The program is focused in the areas of Family, Housing and Consumer law. After completing training, Bridging the Gap interns are expected to commit to a minimum of five hours a week for the duration of fall and winter quarters (one hour is a weekly staff meeting).

Benefits to students:

  • Hands-on experience interviewing clients;
  • Training in substantive legal issues, issue-spotting, interviewing skills and ethics;
  • Instruction on how to use the Legal Server database, which is used by most of the civil legal aid organizations in Washington State, and many other states;
  • Supervision and mentoring by experienced attorneys;
  • The satisfaction of helping low and moderate income individuals who otherwise might not receive any legal help at all;
  • Time spent volunteering for Bridging the Gap counts as credits for the Pro Bono Honors Program.

Upper level students (2L, 3L and LLM) may participate in training for the program now (fall quarter) and begin interviewing clients in November. 1Ls can train now and begin interviewing clients in January.

To apply for the program, submit a letter of interest and resume to Ann Spangler by October 3, 2014.

Pro Bono Opportunity with Eastside Legal Assistance Program: Volunteer as a Legal Assistant

ELAP Logo

Do you have research and analytical skills, legal assistant skills or experience and want to use these skills to help quantify legal realities for survivors of domestic violence? Come make equal access to justice in our community a reality by assisting Eastside Legal Assistance Program (ELAP) staff attorneys with a targeted research project. Since 1998, ELAP has provided survivors of domestic violence and low-income residents of King County with a variety of civil case services enabling equal access to justice including, one-on-one legal clinics, unbundled legal services, brief services, full representation and community education seminars.

Your role as ELAP Legal Assistant volunteer will be to review DV and family law cases and quantify legal outcomes of those clients who worked with, and without, attorneys. This research will open up new ways to advocate for legal aid.

For a complete description of the volunteer opportunity, click here.

Free Webinar on Oct. 8 on Responsible Innovation and Social Entrepreneurship

Unite for Sight Logo

Wednesday, Oct. 8, 2014
4:00 – 5:00 PM EST

Learn from leading experts about responsible innovation and social entrepreneurship. The webinar will include guidance and advice from six panelists, as well as ample opportunity to ask the speakers questions about strategies and tools for responsible innovation and social entrepreneurship. Learn about the complexities of innovation, the critical importance of locally-responsible solutions, and how to develop and grow ideas into effective programs. This webinar is ideal for students, faculty, university advisors, and professionals interested in innovation, social entrepreneurship, and global health.

The webinar’s expert panelists are:

  • Andrew Bentley, Google Fiber, Digital Inclusion Program Manager; Co-Founder, Global Health Corps
  • Elizabeth Johansen, Director of Product Development, Design That Matters
  • Rich Leimsider, Vice President of Fellowship Programs, Echoing Green
  • Jordan Levy, Chief External Relations Officer, Ubuntu Education Fund
  • James Nardella, Executive Director, Lwala Community Alliance
  • Carter Powers, COO, Dimagi
  • ​Moderated by Jennifer Staple-Clark, Founder and CEO, Unite For Sight

Register for the webinar here.

U.S. Department of Justice Introduces New Job Search Mobile App for Law Students and Attorneys

DOJ Law Jobs

The U.S. Department of Justice unveiled a new mobile app, called DOJ Law Jobs, which will provide attorneys and law students with a quick and easy way to find an attorney position or law student internship with the Department. DOJ Law Jobs is available for free now on iTunes for Apple iPhone, and additional versions for iPad and Android devices will be available in the next few weeks. The mobile app was developed by the Office of Attorney Recruitment and Management and Office of the Chief Information Officer. Users of the app will be able to create personalized job searches based on practice area, geographic preference, and hiring organization.

Download the application here on iTunes.  Android versions to follow.

 

Full Time Staff Attorney Position Vacancies & Other Summer Opportunities!

UW Moderate Means Program is Recruiting Interns for Summer and Fall Quarters, Due 6/6

moderate means program

The Moderate Means Program (MMP) is a UW Law in-house pro bono program that is a great way to get experience interviewing lots of clients without having to leave Gates Hall! The goal of the program is to increase access to civil legal services by people of moderate means who cannot afford an attorney but make too much money to qualify for traditional legal aid services. The program is focused on the areas of Family, Housing and Consumer law.

Law students serving as MMP volunteer interns will interview potential clients by telephone to collect information and evaluate their cases. Qualifying cases will be referred by the MMP interns to participating attorneys who have agreed to represent Moderate Means Program clients for a reduced fee. MMP interns will be expected to commit to a minimum of five hours a week for the duration of spring quarter and this summer (one hour is a weekly staff meeting).

For a complete job description and application instructions, click here.

Attention Recent Grads! Catholic Community Services of Western Washington Seeking Staff Attorney

CCS Logo

The Legal Action Center offers free legal assistance to qualifying low income persons in King County who are facing evictions and subsidy terminations, landlord/tenant issues, and debtor/creditor issues related to past tenancies.

In eviction and subsidy termination cases, clients first speak to our staff over the phone to have their case evaluated. Then they may be scheduled for an appointment. Attorneys and paralegals provide free legal assistance ranging from self-help information to representation in court.

This position is responsible for providing legal services to low income households facing eviction, housing subsidy terminations or other barriers to securing suitable housing.

For a full job description and application instructions, click here.

Attention Post Grads!  Northwest Justice Project Seeking Full Time Staff Attorney in Everett With 3+ Years Experience

NJP Logo

The Northwest Justice Project (NJP) is a not-for-profit statewide law firm that pursues its mission through legal representation, community partnerships, and education to combat injustice and promote the long-term well-being of low-income individuals, families, and communities throughout Washington.  NJP seeks applications from qualified attorneys committed to supporting our mission through the work of our Everett regional office.

Successful applicants for this position will have experience in all aspects of civil litigation, with a minimum of 3 years in family law, preferably in Washington State.  Experience preferred in one or more additional areas of law that particularly impact low income persons. Applicants should be culturally competent and have demonstrated experience working with low-income client communities. Washington State Bar Association membership in good standing, the ability to acquire membership through reciprocity, or ability to take the next Washington bar exam is required.  Significant civil legal aid and/or civil litigation experience is strongly preferred.

For a full job description and application instructions, click here.

Transgender Law Center Seeking 2014 Immigration Detention Law Clerk

Transgender Law Center Logo

Transgender Law Center works to change law, policy, and attitudes so that all people can live safely, authentically, and free from discrimination regardless of their gender identity or expression. Through a Soros Justice Fellowship, Olga Tomchin has started an Immigration Detention project at Transgender Law Center to challenge the inhumane treatment of indigent transgender people in immigration detention and improve their access to quality deportation defense representation.

A clerkship with the Immigration Detention project at Transgender Law Center will provide selected law students with a unique opportunity to gain a first-hand education in the intersection of transgender law, immigrants’ rights, and anti-incarceration work. Clerks will receive close training and supervision by Transgender Law Center attorneys.

For a complete job description and application instructions, click here.

Transgender Law Center Seeking Fall 2014 Legal Intern

Transgender Law Center Logo

Transgender Law Center works to change law, policy, and attitudes so that all people can live safely, authentically, and free from discrimination regardless of their gender identity or expression.

Transgender Law Center provides legal assistance and information to more than 2,200 transgender people and their families each year, and also engages in selective high-impact litigation to advance transgender rights, such as the recent groundbreaking EEOC decision in our case Macy v. Holder.

A clerkship with Transgender Law Center will provide selected law students with a unique opportunity to gain a first-hand education in transgender law through providing direct legal assistance to transgender community members and their families, assisting with litigation, conducting legal research and writing, and participating in creating new legal publications. Prior experience or knowledge of transgender law is preferred, but not required. Clerks will receive regular training and supervision by Transgender Law Center attorneys.

For a complete job description and application instructions, click here.

Attention Post Grads!  Columbia Legal Services Seeking Adjunct Attorney in Its Children & Youth  Project in Olympia, 2+ Years Experience Required

CLS Logo

For many years, Columbia Legal Services has represented some of the most marginalized people in our community. We use every legal tool available on their behalf. Our role to serve people and use advocacy that might otherwise not be available makes our work an integral part of the Washington Alliance for Equal Justice. As a proud member of the Alliance, our vision of justice is when people have the necessary tools and opportunity to achieve social and economic justice, a more equitable and inclusive society is possible. Every day, our legal teams engage in advocacy intended to make a lasting difference so that all people can be meaningful members of their communities. Through large-scale litigation, policy reform, and innovative partnerships, our lawyers and staff work in furtherance of our mission. We share a deep commitment to serve and advocate alongside our clients as we seek justice together.

Columbia Legal Services seeks an attorney with experience in child welfare, education, or juvenile justice cases. The position is full-time and will be based in our Olympia office. Applicant must be willing to travel to the Seattle office throughout the year. This is an adjunct, twelve-month position, with possible extension depending on funding. Job responsibilities include policy advocacy in the legislative and administrative forums, and litigation. Applicant must be a member of the Washington State Bar.

For a complete job description and application instructions, click here

Job Positions in Civil Rights, Juvenile Justice, Human Rights and More

RESULTS Accepting Applications for Real Change Fellow, Due 3/21

Real Change Logo

RESULTS is taking applications for our REAL Change fellowship, which includes a scholarship that covers almost the entire costs of coming to our conference this summer along with training and support throughout the year. More on the program:

As A REAL Change Fellow You Will:

  • Receive training and support over 12 months to become a powerful advocate for the end of poverty.
  • Learn how to lobby your member of Congress on everything from tax policies that can lift millions of low-income Americans out of poverty to global health initiatives like GAVI (Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunizations).
  • Become a skilled organizer who mobilizes your community to fight poverty.
  • Attend the RESULTS International Conference (IC) featuring speakers like World Bank President Dr. Jim Kim.
  • Write pieces that get published in the media.
  • Start your own RESULTS chapter or help a local RESULTS chapter grow and thrive.

For a full description and application details, click here.

Call for Applications for the Immigrant and Refugee Commission, Due 3/21

City of Seattle Logo

The City of Seattle is opening up the application process for new commissioners to serve on the Immigrant and Refugee Commission. The Office of Immigrant and Refugee Affairs was created in January 2012 and this commission is one of the many important ways in which the City ensures that they are actively engaging and working with  immigrant and refugee communities.

With the unprecedented growth in the foreign-born population since the 1980s, Seattle has become an increasingly multi-cultural city, rich with diversity. In keeping with the Race and Social Justice Initiative, Mayor Edward B. Murray and the Seattle City Council want to ensure that city government provides high-quality customer service to all, including immigrants and refugees living and working in Seattle, and that residents are engaged in all aspects of Seattle’s civic, economic and cultural life. To this end, the Immigrant and Refugee Commission was created in 2008.

For more information and application details, click here.

Landesa Seeking Graduate Legal Intern, Due 3/21

Landesa Logo

he Landesa Internship Program is part of Landesa’s broader efforts to incrase the number of professionals who work on and/or have an understanding of land rights, whether in the land right field specifically, the wider development community, the government sector, or elsewhere. Graduate Legal Interns will have the opportunity to increase their understanding of Landesa’s strategies and methodologies by attending project and staff meetings. They will also take part in periodic Q&A sessions with Landesa’s land tenure experts who can speak to land rights issues, specific projects, and careers in the international development field. Upon completing this internship at Landesa, Graduate Legal Interns will be invited to join an alumni network comprised of previous interns and fellows.

The Graduate Legal Intern conducts research and supports the research efforts of others on a variety of topics relevant to Landesa’s work. Past Graduate Legal intern assisgnments include: compiling case studies of large-scale corporate land acquisitions; identifying and analyzing the particular effects of climate change on women’s land rights; conducting a legal review of Rwandan land laws; helping to write a concept note (a Landesa project design tool) for a project proposing to use mobile technology in Kenya; and identify and analyzing Myanmar’s resettlement practices and laws on takings and compensation.

The Graduate Legal intern will be supervised by a land rights attorney and will work with Landesa program staff requesting research including Program Directors and project leads.

For more information and application details, click here.

Attention Recent Grads & Post Grads! Department of Education Office of Civil Rights Seeking General Attorney, Due 3/24

Dept. of Education

The Department of Education Office of Civil Rights is seeking a full time attorney at entry level and experienced level positions.  As the General Attorney, you will have the responsibility for participating on a civil rights compliance and enforcement team that supports the mission of the Department of Education and the Office for Civil Rights’ (OCR) Strategic Plan. This position is located in a regional civil rights office. OCR operates under the jurisdiction of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, and their implementing regulations.

For a full description and application details, click here.

National Juvenile Justice Network’s Leadership Institute Offers Fellowship for Juvenile Justice Advocates, Due 4/7

National Juvenile Justice Network Logo

Picture somebody in your mind — someone you know — who wants to set the juvenile justice world on fire.  Someone who’s fed up with seeing kids get kicked out of school for minor misbehavior, locked up without due process, or any of a hundred other unjust, unfair things that can blight young people’s lives.

Chances are this army-of-one you’re picturing in your mind is ready to apply to the Youth Justice Leadership Institute, a robust, year-long fellowship program run by the National Juvenile Justice Network that focuses on cultivating and supporting professionals of color. Our goal is to create the foundation for a more effective juvenile justice reform movement by developing a strong base of advocates and organizers who reflect the communities most affected by juvenile justice system practices and policies.

Applications are due April 7, 2014.

For more information, click here.  Click here to download the application packet.

The Opportunity Agenda Seeking Summer 2014 Law and Advocacy Intern, Due 4/21

Opportunity Agenda Logo

The Opportunity Agenda is a non-partisan public interest organization that promotes opportunity and human rights in the United States, bringing together legal and policy advocacy, social science research, and communications strategies.  Our mission is to build the national will to expand opportunity in America.  The Opportunity Agenda focuses on issues that incorporate racial justice, women’s rights, immigrant rights and economic justice for all.

The Opportunity Agenda is seeking candidates with a demonstrated commitment to social justice and equal opportunity, strong research and writing skills, and the initiative to take on new and innovative assignments. A sense of humor and a dose of modesty are essential.

Law students will assist in legal research and writing to support The Opportunity Agenda’s Law and Advocacy work.  This summer, the focus would be on immigration policy, racial justice, human rights, and economic opportunity.  Past research topics have included the application of international human rights laws to state constitutional and statutory jurisprudence, analysis of, and advocacy around, existing state and federal policies to promote equality across race, gender, income, and other characteristics; new approaches to addressing subconscious and structural bias in the law; and promising policies for promoting immigrant rights and economic opportunity.  The work will be supervised by The Opportunity Agenda’s Robert L. Carter Fellow and Director of Law and Advocacy.

For complete details and application information, click here.

OBMICA Seeking Summer Intern to Work in Dominican Republic, Spanish Fluency Required

OBMICA Locutorio

OBMICA, a forward-looking think tank based in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, is seeking a summer legal intern to assist in ongoing research and monitoring of human rights of migrants and their descendants in the DR. Potential projects in which the intern would participate include gender needs in the deportation process, monitoring the implementation of the national regularization plan for migrants, or others.   The intern’s work will focus on identifying the legal issues and their social implications, paying attention to human rights violations under regional and national, and international jurisprudence.

The experience will most likely involve client interaction and fact gathering with persons directly affected, as well as a heavy legal writing component, working in conjunction with OBMICA and other organizations on the ground.  The goal of the internship is to draft a legal memo that may be made public through OBMICA and their national and international partners.  A full work program will be drawn up by mutual agreement upon commencement of the internship.

For complete information and application details, visit Symplicity.  For more information on OBMICA, visit their website here.

Two Summer Clerk Positions Still Available at Public Counsel in Los Angeles, CA

Public_Counsel

Adoptions Project

The Adoptions Project provides free legal representation to foster parents who are adopting children out of foster care, and also advocates for additional services and benefits for the children being adopted. The Adoptions Project has an available position for a summer law clerk. Summer interns generally have the opportunity to: (1) acquire practical skills working with professionals from different fields; (2) conduct client interviews and help to identify gaps in clients’ services or benefits; (3) work on an adoption case from start to finish under the supervision of an attorney; and (4) conduct legal research applicable to the Project.

Date Needed: May 27, 2014 – August 1, 2014, but looking to interview candidates as soon as possible

Community Development Project

Public Counsel’s Community Development Project (CDP) strives to build healthy, inclusive, economically stable communities through the delivery of pro bono legal services to community-based nonprofits and small businesses in Los Angeles County. CDP provides transactional legal services to nonprofits that assist lower income people and neighborhoods and to entrepreneurs located in, and employing residents of, low income neighborhoods. CDP also advances community driven planning, development and litigation strategies to promote affordable housing and equitable development, create jobs and encourage child care facilities. Our clients include neighborhood based community development corporations, housing advocacy and organizing groups and coalitions, health care clinics, small businesses and child care providers serving areas in need in Los Angeles, including Boyle Heights, South LA, Pico Union, Wilmington, San Gabriel Valley and Skid Row.

Public Counsel’s Community Development Project has an available position for a summer law clerk. The bulk of the work will involve legal research, policy analysis, writing memos, and reviewing planning documents regarding extremely low-income communities of color in Los Angeles and all over the U.S. The clerk’s work will include efforts to understand, investigate, and engage processes and policies around transit-oriented development which may result in the displacement of low-income communities. The clerk may also help support CDP’s transactional and litigation programs to advance affordable housing, child care and job creation strategies.

Date Needed: May 27, 2014 – August 1, 2014, but looking to interview candidates as soon as possible

For complete information and application details, here.