Searching For A Career in Government? Career Fair This Tuesday at Mary Gates Hall!

October 24: Fair Housing Community Workshop

Seattle Office for Civil Rights

Date: Saturday, Oct. 24, 2015
Time: 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Location: New Holly Gathering Hall, 7054 32nd Ave. S., Seattle, WA 98118

In 2014 the Seattle Office for Civil Rights tested rental units across the city. In two thirds of tests, prospective renters were treated differently on the basis of race, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity and national origin.

Light refreshments and childcare will be provided.

To register, click here.

October 26: Global Mondays “Local Immigrant and Refugee Communities’ Political Participation and Collaboration with Seattle Police Department” by Habtamu Abdi (LL.M. 2010), Immigrants and Refugee Coordinator, Seattle Police Department

Date: Monday, Oct. 26, 2015
Time: 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
Location: William H. Gates Hall, RM 117

Global Mondays

We are pleased to welcome back to UW Law Mr. Habtamu Abdi (LL.M. 2010). Mr. Abdi graduated from Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia, with a B.A. in Sociology and Social Anthropology, and then worked as a social worker. Due to severe human rights violations in that part of the world, he decided to go into the legal field. He obtained an LL.M in Intercultural Human Rights Law from St. Thomas University in Florida in 2008 and an LL.M. in Sustainable International Development from UW Law in 2010. Having previously worked as a Commissioner with the City of Seattle Office of Immigrants and Refugee Affairs, and later with the Mayor’s Office, Mr. Abdi currently serves as Strategic Advisor to Chief of Police Kathleen O’Toole on relation building with Immigrants and Refugees.

Mr. Abdi will discuss immigrant and refugee participation in local politics. As an example, he will highlight the successes and challenges the East African Communities (mainly Ethiopians, Somalis and Eritreans) are experiencing in King County and in the Puget Sound.

Lunch will be served.

October 27: Social Justice Tuesday “D is for Disability: The ABC’s of Disability”

SJT

Date: Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2015
Time: 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
Location: William H. Gates Hall, RM 127, unless otherwise noted

“Did you know that approximately one in five individuals in America has a disability? Although individuals with disabilities have faced a long history of widespread discrimination and exclusion they are becoming more involved in society every year. As a result it is crucial that current and future legal practitioners better understand individuals with disabilities in order to effectively serve their community. Would you like to obtain a better understanding of disability etiquette as well as how to better advocate for individuals with disabilities? If so then, please join us.

Speakers:

Emerson Sekins from Washington Access Fund
Nancy Boulet, National Disability Institution
Alumni Conrad Reynoldson

If you would like lunch please RSVP via Symplicity or gatespsl@uw.edu RSVP by 12:00 pm Monday, October 26, 2015.

October 27: 2015 Government Career Fair

2015 Government Career Fair Banner

Date: Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2015
Time: 2:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Location: Mary Gates Hall, Commons

Dress: Business Casual

Open to All Majors, Class Levels, and Alumni from All Three UW Campuses!

Are you interested in gaining a career opportunity working in a government setting? Then you will definitely want to attend the Government Career Fair sponsored by the Career Center on October 27th. Registered government employers are looking to fill part-time, full time and internship opportunities for their agency and are looking to HIRE HUSKIES.Before attending the fair, please check out the list of attending agencies and to research those employers you’re interested in meeting by visiting their websites and learning more about them. Please bring your resumes and come join us!

For more information, click here.

October 28: Career Building Workshop – Cover Letters that Work

CPSL Logo

Date: Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2015
Time: 12:30 – 1:20 PM
Location: William H. Gates Hall, RM 127

A cover letter is not a mere recitation of your resume in narrative form. It is an opportunity to articulate a connection between you and a prospective employer; to identity relevant skills and experiences that may benefit the employer; and to demonstrate your persuasive writing skills- all on one page!

Join us for a brown bag (bring your own) lunch career workshop to learn the basics of writing a winning cover letter for legal employers. All UW law students are welcome.

October 29: An Evening of Justice at Wing Luke for the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project

NWIRP Logo

Date: Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015
Time: 5:30 PM
Location: Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience, 719 South King St., Seattle, WA

You’re invited to attend NWIRP’s annual fall reception, An Evening of Justice at Wing Luke, next Thursday!

We’ll have live music, food and drinks, museum exploration (including the new Bruce Lee exhibit), and a short program celebrating our shared commitment to justice and honoring our community, including our 2015 Outstanding Community Partner, Puentes.

To purchase tickets, click here.

October 30: Attention Attorneys! Reception to Meet UW Law International LLM Students Practicing Their Networking Skills

UW Law

Date: Friday, Oct. 30, 2015
Time: 5:15 PM
Location: K&L Gates, 929 4th Ave., Ste. 2900, Seattle, WA

The University of Washington School of Law will be holding networking training sessions for its international LL.M. students on October 30th.  The workshops, run by former Perkins Coie partners, Ping Kiang and Colleen Yamaguchi, will be followed by a reception graciously hosted by K&L Gates.  Please come to get to know some of the 115 LL.M. students.  The school has students from 47 countries this year who are getting their LLMs in one of its seven LL.M. programs.

A reception will begin at 5:15 p.m. at the offices of K&L Gates, 929 4th Ave, # 2900.

The UW School of Law would greatly appreciate your participation in this endeavor to help its talented group of international LL.M. students practice their networking skills.  If you can attend, please email your name and the name of your firm ASAP to gradlaw@uw.edu so that K&L Gates can estimate the amount of food and drink for the reception.

November 5: Advice from Experts for Applying Lessons in Cultural Competency

Unite for Sight Logo

Date: Thursday, Nov. 5, 2015
Time: 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM EST
Location: Webinar

Learn from leading experts about navigating cultural competency. Gain insight about key cultural competency lessons, and on how to apply cultural competency and humility to international and domestic settings.

Webinar Panelists:​

  • Dean Cycon, Founder and CEO, Dean’s Beans Organic Coffee Co.
  • Paul Ellingstad, Director of Human Progress Initiatives, HP Corporate Affairs, Hewlett-Packard
  • Brian Heuser, Assistant Professor of the Practice of International Education Policy, Peabody College of Vanderbilt University; Affiliated Faculty, Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health
  • Natacha Poggio, Founder and Director, Design Global Change; Assistant Professor, Graphic Design, Lamar University
  • Jana Zindell, Chief Programs Officer, Ubuntu Education Fund

Moderated by Jennifer Staple-Clark, Founder and CEO, Unite For Sight

To register, click here.

November 8: Save the Date for LOL – A Comedy Event to Prevent and End Homelessness brought to you by Seattle Community Law Center, Featuring Brett Hamil

Date: Sunday, Nov. 8, 2015
Time: 5:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Location: Triple Door, 216 Union St., Seattle, 98101

LOL Fundraiser

For more information, click here.

November 16: UW School of Law Invites You to a Special Discussion on Advancing Diversity in Law, Business, and Public Institutions

UWLaw

Date: Monday, Nov. 16, 2015
Time: 6:00 PM Welcome & Conversation; 7:00 PM Reception
Location: Fairmont Olympic Hotel, 411 University Street, Seattle, WA

Join these leaders in discussing the next steps for making diversity and inclusion happen in legal practice, all the way up to the top levels of leadership. The gap between diversity in the legal profession and the nation’s population has widened in recent years. That gap is biggest at the top levels of management. Hear about the best practices of each of these leaders and their suggestions for how to address this challenge. Discover the success they have found in developing a diverse pipeline of new, inclusive leaders for tomorrow’s legal profession.

Panelists:

  • Ben Wilson, Managing Principal, Beveridge & Diamond
  • Justice Mary Yu, Associate Justice, Washington Supreme Court
  • Brad Smith, President and Chief Legal Officer, Microsoft

Moderator:

  • Kellye Testy, Toni Rembe Dean & Professor of Law

To register, click here.

December 10: Register Now for 7th Annual Global WA Conference on Disruptive Development

GlobalWA 2015 Conference Banner

Date: Thursday, Dec. 10, 2015
Time: 8:00 AM – 5:30 PM

Washington state has a powerful concentration of NGOs, for-profit businesses, academic institutions, and philanthropists working to improve the lives of people living in poor countries. Global Washington brings these stakeholders together at an annual conference to spotlight the most relevant and timely issues.

Our annual conference is well known and well respected for convening the international development community on the west coast, including NGO practitioners, CSR business executives, research experts, philanthropists, and others working on global issues. Conference sessions will highlight successful partnerships, groundbreaking innovations, and productive failures within global development.

To register, click here.

UW CAYLAC Clinic Helps Open New Opportunities Through Juvenile Justice Law

Starting Today, Juvenile Justice Law Opens Up Opportunities for Tens of Thousands of Washingtonians 

CLS Logo

By Columbia Legal Services

Today, tens of thousands of Washingtonians, and thousands of youth every year, will have significantly more opportunities despite childhood mistakes. This historic change comes as a result of a major juvenile justice law – the Youth Equality and Reintegration Act (SB 5564) – which was passed by the Washington legislature this past legislative session. […]

The prime legislative sponsors were Sen. Steve O’Ban (R-University Place) and Rep. Ruth Kagi (D-Seattle) and the advocacy was also led by students from the University of Washington Children and Youth Legislative Advocacy Clinic. More information on the YEAR Act is available here.

Read the entire publication here.

Washington Journal of Environmental Law & Policy (WJELP) Hosting First Annual Symposium on Ocean Acidification and Coastal Health, Now Accepting Paper Submissions

WJELP Logo

The Washington Journal of Environmental Law & Policy (WJELP) invites submissions for papers focused on ocean acidification. Partnering with the UW Law Environmental Law Program, WJELP will be hosting an Ocean Acidification Symposium on November 6, 2015. Accepted papers will be featured at the symposium and later printed in an edited volume. Submitted papers should relate to the growing need for law and policy addressing ocean acidification, strategies to manage ocean acidification at various scales (local, regional, national and global), and other related topics (using ocean acidification to target CO2 emissions, sustainable aquaculture, land-based sources of water pollution, etc.). We also welcome proposals for symposium speakers. Paper submissions due by October 16, 2015.

For more information, click here.

World Health Organization Releases New Publication on Sexual Health, Human Rights and the Law

WHO

Sexual health today is widely understood as a state of physical, emotional, mental and social wellbeing in relation to sexuality. It encompasses not only certain aspects of reproductive health – such as being able to control one’s fertility through access to contraception and abortion, and being free from sexually transmitted infections (STIs), sexual dysfunction and sequelae related to sexual violence or female genital mutilation – but also, the possibility of having pleasurable and safe sexual experiences, free of coercion, discrimination and violence. Indeed, it has become clear that human sexuality includes many different forms of behaviour and expression, and that the recognition of the diversity of sexual behaviour and expression contributes to people’s overall sense of well-being and health.

Continue reading here.

Judges Rebuke Limits on Wiping Out Student Loans

Janet Roth (Photo (c) Nick Cote, NYT)

By Tara Siegel Bernard | New York Times

[…] The judge, Jim D. Pappas, in his concurring opinion for the bankruptcy appellate panel decision in the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, said the analysis used “to determine the existence of an undue hardship is too narrow, no longer reflects reality and should be revised.”

He added: “It would seem that in this new, different environment, in determining whether repayment of a student loan constitutes an undue hardship, a bankruptcy court should be afforded flexibility to consider all relevant facts about the debtor and the subject loans.” But the current standard, he wrote, “does not allow it.”

Read the entire article here.  Photo courtesy of Nick Cote, New York Times.

EEOC Bans Discrimination Against Gays in Workplaces

EEOC Seal

By Sue Reisinger | Corporate Counsel

In a historic decision, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has ruled that all job discrimination based on sexual orientation is a form of sex discrimination under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

The 3-2 decision, dated July 16, does what Congress and most courts so far have refused to do: ban discrimination against gays in the workplace. Until now only a handful of states and municipalities have done so.

The EEOC foreshadowed its decision in a field memo last February saying that workers are protected under Title VII from discrimination based on sexual orientation as well as gender identity.

Continue reading here.

Attention New and Young Lawyers! Service Opportunity with the WSBA, Due 8/14

WSBA Logo

The Washington Young Lawyers Committee encourages WSBA’s new and young lawyers to apply to serve as a young lawyer liaison to one of the following sections:

Apply now! Deadline is Friday, Aug. 14, at 5 p.m.

For more information about the volunteer position and application process, click here.

The key to happiness is in this post (among other things)…

When Discretion Means Denial: A National Perspective on Criminal Records Barriers to Federally Subsidized Housing

Although the Department of Housing and Urban Development has given wide discretion to public housing authorities and federally subsidized project owners to admit low-income tenants with criminal records, many continue to deny housing to these individuals. Overly restrictive policies against people with criminal records can violate civil rights laws, increase homelessness, and otherwise impede a person’s chance to reintegrate into society.

A new report from the Shriver Center, When Discretion Means Denial: A National Perspective on Criminal Records Barriers to Federally Subsidized Housing, urges the Department of Housing and Urban Development to take active steps to eliminate barriers to housing for persons who have had contact with the criminal justice system.

Based on a review of over 300 written admissions policies from across the country, the report finds that the wide discretion given housing providers has resulted in broad screening criteria that deny individuals admission to housing for mere arrests and decades-old convictions, among other problems. The report identifies four areas where criminal records policies tend to be overly restrictive.

Learn more and download the report.

How laws around the world do and do not protect women from violence by David L. Richards & Jillienne Haglund

This article and accompanying photo is from The Washington Post’s Monkey Cage blog. 

In 1999, Jessica Lenahan-Gonzales’s estranged husband took her three girls in violation of a permanent restraining order requiring him to remain at least 100 yards from her and her children. The police of Castle Rock, Colo., failed to enforce the restraining order — after multiple requests — and the three girls were murdered by the estranged husband. A legal case against the police force reached the Supreme Court and, in a 7-to-2 decision, the court ruled that Castle Rock and its police could not be sued for failing to enforce a restraining order. In 2011, the case reached the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR), which found that the United States failed both to protect Lenahan and her daughters from domestic violence and to provide equal protection before the law. Further, said the IACHR, “all States have a legal obligation to protect women from domestic violence,” and this is “a problem widely recognized by the international community as a serious human rights violation and an extreme form of discrimination.”

Violence against women (VAW) is a pandemic, by any measure, and the repeated failures on the part of nations to provide meaningful recourse for victims of entrenched gender violence has led to growing calls by national and transnational actors alike for the adoption of stronger gender-violence legislation in all countries. Consequently, several important questions arise regarding the adoption and strength of domestic gender-violence laws, including:

[Continue reading here]

10th Annual Human Rights Institute – Human Rights Project at the Urban Justice Center (Co-sponsored by the US Human Rights Network)

May 7-9, 2015 | New York City

The Human Rights Project at the Urban Justice Center, in partnership with the US Human Rights Network, is pleased to announce that applications for its 10th annual Human Rights Institute (HRI) are currently available. The institute is a three-day professional development opportunity that promotes good governance and social change. It trains a select group of participants to strengthen their local efforts by using a human rights frame. Alumni become part of a nationwide community of advocates and have access to ongoing education, technical support and dialogue.

 Apply TodayScholarships are available to applicants with demonstrable need.

  • Scholarship Application Deadline – February 23, 2015
  • Regular Application Deadline – February 27, 2015

7 Essential Habits of Happier People (How Many Do You Possess?) by Jeff Haden

Happiness: everyone wants it, yet relatively few seem to get enough of it, especially those in their early forties. (That’s about the time many of us start thinking, “Is this all there is?”)

Maybe that’s because approximately 50% of your “happiness set-point” is determined by personality traits that are largely hereditary. In short, half of how happy you feel is basically outside your control. (Bummer.)

But that also means 50% of your level of happiness is totally within your control: relationships, health, career, etc. So even if you’re genetically disposed to be somewhat gloomy, you can still do things to make yourself a lot happier.

Like these:

1. Make good friends.

It’s easy to focus on building a professional network of partners, customers, employees, connections, etc, because there is (hopefully) a payoff.

But there’s a definite payoff to making real (not just professional or social media) friends. Increasing your number of friends correlates to higher subjective wellbeing. In terms of how happy you feel, doubling your number of friends is like increasing your income by 50%.

And if that’s not enough, people who don’t have strong social relationships are 50% less likely to survive at any given time than those who do. (That’s a scary thought for relative loners like me.)

Make friends outside of work. Make friends at work. Make friends everywhere.

But above all, make real friends. You’ll live a happier and longer life.

[Continue reading here]

Inmates re-entering society should not face lifetime barriers to work by Dan Satterberg & Brady Walkinshaw

Originally appeared as an “Opinion” piece in The Seattle Times

MORE than 7,000 people will finish their prison sentences and return to the community this year in Washington state. On the day of their release, each inmate is highly motivated never to return to prison, but more than half will be arrested within their first year back in the community. Why?

One reason is the hidden barriers that limit successful re-entry into our society. Former inmates don’t have access to many educational and job opportunities and are prohibited from applying for professional licenses that could lead to stable incomes.

Most of us are familiar with the direct consequences of committing a crime — jail or prison time, fines, community service, probation and treatment, but it’s the lesser-known indirect consequences that play a large part in why former inmates return to prison. These are known as “collateral consequences” because they have been imposed, not by judges or the criminal law, but by legislative bodies as additional hidden punishments.

While the terms of the sentence are measured in months or years, collateral consequences can last a lifetime. Is it fair to impose lifetime disabilities long after the debt has been paid to society? We don’t think so.

[Continue reading here]

Extra extra! Transitional Justice, International Human Rights, and Debtors Prison

American Association for Justice Opens Applications for its Women for Justice Education Fund’s 2014 Mike Eidson Scholarship, Due 5/1

AAJ Logo

As the world’s largest trial bar, AAJ promotes justice and fairness for injured persons, safeguards victims’ rights—particularly the right to trial by jury—and strengthens the civil justice system through education and disclosure of information critical to public health and safety. AAJ fights daily to protect the civil justice system against corporations and powerful individuals.

The Mike Eidson Scholarship Fund was established by the AAJ Women for Justice Education Fund in 2008, in honor of AAJ Past President Mike Eidson, whose vision and generosity inspired it. The scholarship, traditionally in the amount of $5,000, is awarded annually to a rising 3L (or rising 4L in a night program) female student who has demonstrated a commitment to a career as a plaintiffs’ lawyer or criminal defense lawyer, along with dedication to upholding and defending the principles of the Constitution, and to the concept of a fair trial, the adversary system, and a just result for the injured, the accused, and those whose rights are jeopardized.

Download the application details here.

The Venice Academy of Human Rights 2014 Presents Conference on the “Judicial Legitimacy and the Rule of Law”, Early Bird Registration 3/15

Venice Academy of Human Rights July 7-16, 2014

The Venice Academy of Human Rights is an international programme of excellence for human rights education, research and debate. It forms part of the European Inter-University Centre for Human Rights and Democratisation (EIUC). The theme of this year’s academy is “Judicial Legitimacy and the Rule of Law.”  Online applications are accepted until 4 May 2014. The Academy offers an “early bird” registration with a reduced participation fee until March 15, 2014.

For more information on the upcoming conference, click here.

University of Ulster’s Transitional Justice Institute Now Accepting Applications for LLM Human Rights Law and Transitional Justice, Due 6/30

University of Ulster Transitional Justice Institute

We are currently accepting applications for the LLM Human Rights Law and Transitional Justice programme, for 2014-15 entry.  This exciting and innovative programme is offered by the Transitional Justice Institute and is the only one of its kind in the UK and Ireland.  It is delivered by active researchers at both the Jordanstown and Magee campuses, on a full-time (one year) or part-time (two +years) basis, providing excellent flexibility in location and duration of study.  The programme will enable you to develop skills highly relevant to legal practice, and to policy, research and advocacy roles.

For detailed information on the LLM Program and application details, click here.

Hot off the press!  ACLU and CLS Release Report on “Modern Day Prisoners”

ACLU Image of Hands Behind Bars

By: American Civil Liberties Union and Columbia Legal Services

The report describes a counterproductive debt system that punishes people for their poverty while bringing little benefit to government or the public. At its worst, it results in poor people being locked up because they lack the money to pay off debts imposed by the legal system – creating a modern version of the despised debtors’ prison. The report provides profiles of individuals and recommends a series of reforms to bring fairness to the system.

The report focuses on the state’s system of Legal Financial Obligations (LFOs) – fees, fines, costs and restitution imposed by courts on top of criminal sentences.  The debts accrue interest at an exorbitant rate of 12% a year and can amount to a lifetime sentence for someone without the means to pay them off.  In some instances, the expense of running the system costs a county more than the debts it collects.

Continue reading here.

ABA Resolution Endorses a Human Right to Adequate Food

ABA Logo

By: Debra Cassens Weiss, ABA Journal

The ABA House of Delegates has passed a resolution calling for increased funding and a reordering of priorities to fight hunger in the United States.

Resolution 107 urges governments to increase funding and implement strategies “to promote the human right to adequate food and nutrition for all.” The resolution also urges the U.S. government to make the realization of a human right to adequate food a principal objective of domestic policy.

Continue reading here.