Interested in Volunteering for the UN? Join the Discussion with UW Law Alumna, Johanna Gusman!

December 3: A Conversation with Johanna Gusman on UN Volunteer Work

Johanna Gusman

Date: Thursday, Dec. 3, 2015
Time: 8:30 AM
Location: TBA (Please contact Professor Anita Ramasastry)

Next Thursday Johanna Gusman, a UW Law School alumna and Gates Scholar, will visit us from Cairo via a Google hangout, to discuss how to work as a UN Volunteer (which is actually a quasi paid opportunity).  This is a great way for lawyers and others to get their “foot in the door” to work with the UN on longer term contracts.  We will connect with her online at 8:30 a.m. on 12/3 — Room TBA.  For those of you who are not in Seattle or who need to listen from home, please contact Professor Anita Ramasastry as soon as possible, and she will transmit instructions for how to join us via Google.

For more information, please contact Professor Ramasastry at arama@uw.edu.

December 4: Rahul Gairola Presentation on Migrations in Absentia: Digital Advertising & Manipulation of Partition Trauma

Rahul Gairola

Date: Friday, Dec. 4, 2015
Time: 3:30 PM – 4:30 PM
Location: Seattle University, Hunthausen Hall 100

This paper contributes to existing and new scholarship in Partition and affect studies, on the one hand, and cultural and digital humanities studies, on the other, as the 70th anniversary of the geo- political division of South Asia approaches in 2017. I begin by proposing a rationale for two digital advertisements by Google and Coca Cola that attempt to capitalize on the trauma of Partition by celebrating both products as facilitating harmony between India and Pakistan. Indeed, these advertisements market “happiness” as the ultimate horizon of neoliberal experience for the subjects that they depict.

While I do not here want to undermine the nostalgic value or the raw emotions behind the subjects and sentiments portrayed, I would argue that it is crucial to question the ethical dilemmas of marketing products that utopically represent the Partition’s communal bloodshed. In particular, these advertisements promise what I call “migrations in absentia,” or the promise of movement across borders without moving from one’s geo-political space. I conclude that despite the hege-monic pull of both ads, a number of resistant representations counter their influence in the digital public sphere

Rahul Krishna Gairola is an Assistant Professor of English & Comparative Liter-ature at the Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, India. He is, with Amritjit Singh and Nalini Iyer, co-editor of a collection of essays titled Revisiting India’s Partition: Poli-tics, Memories, & Culture (Lexington Books/ Rowman & Littlefield, 2016). He is working on two additional book projects – Homelandings: Diasporic Genealogies of Belonging in Nation and Digital Homes: Electronic Agency in 21st Century South Asia. He is an Article Editor for Postcolonial Text, and Editor of salaam: the newslet-ter of the south asian literary association.

For more information, contact the English Department at 296-5420

December 10: RSJI Speaker Series Presents Kimberlé Crenshaw – Annual Human Rights Day Celebration – Black Lives Matter

RSJI Speaker Series Logo

Date: Thursday, Dec. 10, 2015
Time: 7:00 PM
Location: Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., Seattle, WA 98101

The event is free and open to the public. Tickets are not required.
Please join us for a reception starting at 6:00 pm. Light refreshments will be served.

Kimberlé Crenshaw teaches Civil Rights and other courses in critical race studies and constitutional law. Her primary scholarly interests center around race and the law, and she was a founder and has been a leader in the intellectual movement called Critical Race Theory. She was elected Professor of the Year by the 1991 and 1994 graduating classes. She now splits her time each year between UCLA and the Columbia School of Law.

At the University of Wisconsin Law School, where she received her LL.M., Professor Crenshaw was a William H. Hastie Fellow. She then clerked for Justice Shirley Abrahamson of the Wisconsin Supreme Court.

In 2007, Professor Crenshaw was awarded the Fulbright Chair for Latin America in Brazil. In 2008, she was nominated an Alphonse Fletcher Fellow. In the same year she joined the selective group of scholars awarded with an in-residence fellowship at the Center of Advanced Behavioral Studies at Stanford.

For more information, click here.

December 15: Conversations: Charlesworth and Chinkin Re-Examine the Boundaries of International Law

Hilary Charlesworth and Christine Chinkin

Date: Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2015
Time: 6:30 PM – 8:00 PM
Location: LSE Centre for Women, Peace and Security, London, UK

In 2000 ‘The Boundaries of International Law: a feminist analysis’ shone a spotlight on the status of women in human rights and international law. The authors, Hilary Charlesworth and Christine Chinkin, took a critical look at the development of international law, arguing that the absence of women had produced a narrow and inadequate jurisprudence that legitimated the unequal position of women rather than confronted it. They called for the boundaries of international law to be redrawn to create more equitable status of women in society.

15 years on, Charlesworth and Chinkin revisit their ground-breaking feminist analysis. What has been achieved, and what challenges remain?

To register, click here.

2013 Pro Bono Honorees, Victory for Low-Income Litigants, WSBA Service Opportunities & Become a Mentor

Thank You and Congrats to the 2013 Pro Bono Honors Program Honorees

Award_ribbon_blue_1stCongratulations to Pro Bono Student of the Year Johanna Gusman! Johanna volunteered for the Seattle Women’s Commission, the UN Special Rapporteur, the UW International Human Rights Shadow Letter Writing Project and the UN High Commissioner for Refugees. In addition to her pro bono service hours, Johanna was recognized for her leadership of a pro bono student project. For a complete list of honorees please click here.

The Pro Bono Honors Program, a program of the Center for Public Service Law, encourages law students, faculty and staff to provide pro bono legal assistance to low-income communities; connects students to pro bono resources and opportunities; promotes leadership development; trains students on vital topics such as professionalism, cultural and cross-difference competency and secondary trauma/compassion fatigue; recognizes student pro bono work beyond the 60-hour public service graduation requirement; and promotes a culture of public service in the life of the law school and in the legal profession.

For more info on the Pro Bono Honors Program please click here.

State Supreme Court News: Victory for Low-Income Litigants

SupremeCourtJustices2013The State Supreme Court, in a unanimous decision, ruled that GR 34 requires that all fees and costs be waived for indigent litigants.  Congrats to our friends at Legal Voice and the Northwest Justice Project!

We hold GR 34 provides a uniform standard for determining whether an individual is indigent and further requires the court to waive all fees and costs for individuals who meet this standard. The rule was adopted to ensure that indigent litigants have equal access to justice. Any fees required of indigent litigants are invalid and must be waived under the rule.

Read the full decision here.

Community Representatives Sought for Law-Related Boards and Council

WSBA.jpegThe Washington State Bar Association seeks members of the public (including law students) to serve on four boards and one council for terms beginning October 1, 2013. Serving on a WSBA board or council is an excellent opportunity to get an insider’s view on how the practice of law is regulated in Washington State.

  • The Council on Public Defense addresses concerns about the quality of indigent defense services in Washington State.  Appointment is for a one-year term.
  • The Character and Fitness Board deals with matters of character and fitness bearing on qualifications of applicants for admission to practice law in Washington. The Board conducts hearings on the admission of any applicant referred to it for hearing, considers petitions for reinstatement after disbarment, and makes recommendations to the Board of Governors and Supreme Court regarding admission and reinstatement.  Appointment is for a three-year term. Hearings generally are held every month. Three of the 14-16 members of the Board are not lawyers.
  • The Disciplinary Board reviews lawyer discipline decisions. It is made up of four review committees; each committee has two lawyer members and one non-lawyer member. One committee meets each month to review requests for public hearing, admonitions, interim suspensions and other matters. The board meets six times a year as a full board.
  • The Lawyers’ Fund for Client Protection Board compensates clients who have suffered a direct financial loss caused by the dishonest conduct of a lawyer in connection with the practice of law. The Fund is funded by an annual assessment of members of the WSBA by order of the Washington State Supreme Court.
  • The Limited Practice Board oversees administration of, and compliance with, the Limited Practice Rule (APR 12) authorizing certain lay persons to select, prepare, and complete legal documents pertaining to the closing of real-estate and personal property transactions. The Board is responsible for the certification and regulation of limited practice officers (LPOs).

Applications are also being accepted for other boards which may have openings during the coming year.

Applications must be received at the WSBA offices by Friday, June 14, 2013. To apply, complete the application posted at http://bit.ly/rnvXKY and return it with your resume as directed on the form. Previous applicants should re-apply as applications expire after one year. Appointment letters for current openings will be sent in late summer. If you have questions, please email barleaders@wsba.org.

2L & 3L Volunteers Needed! Help Mentor 1Ls

Wise MentorMembers of the 3L class are teaming up with CPLD to launch a mentoring program for 1L students focused on career development.  The goal of this program is to provide 1L students with mentorship as they prepare to start their post-law school job search.  Additionally, the program allows upper class students to interact with 1L students, who they would not normally get the chance to know.

All 2L and 3L students are encouraged to apply to be a mentor.  We are especially in need of students who participated in OCI, and/or submitted applications for judicial clerkships and public service positions.  The time commitment is up to you.

To take part in the program, please respond to the questions in this catalyst survey: https://catalyst.uw.edu/webq/survey/josiem/202709

Attention 1L students: Look for an upcoming announcement about how you can sign up to be paired with a 2L or 3L mentor.

Questions? Contact Jeff DeGroot, degrootj@uw.edu, or Valerie Rickman, vrickman@uw.edu.