Want to Learn More about Prison Reform and Immigration Detention? Check Out the Lunch Events This Week!

November 2: End It, Don’t Mend It!: Abolition & the Mainstreaming of Prison and Police Reform

Date: Monday, Nov. 2, 2015
Time: 12:30 – 1:20 PM
Location: William H. Gates Hall, RM 127 unless otherwise noted

IMAP Event Flyer

November 3 & 10: Two-Part Social Justice Tuesday Presentations – Resistance to Immigration Detention: From the Local to the National

SJT

Date: Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2015; Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2015
Time: 12:30 – 1:20 PM
Location: William H. Gates Hall, RM 127 unless otherwise noted

In the absence of effective immigration reform, the federal government’s use of detention as an immigration enforcement strategy has increased exponentially.  To keep up with the national quota that requires Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to maintain no less than 34,000 immigration detention beds at all times, immigrants, including lawful permanent residents and asylum seekers, are detained for months and sometimes years. Conditions of confinement in immigration detention facilities are deplorable and yet there are no enforceable regulations that govern management of the detention facilities.  Without access to affordable legal services, conditions of confinement often go unaddressed and immigrant detainees remain particularly vulnerable.  While detained individuals and their families suffer greatly, the private prison industry that contracts with the government to oversee immigration detention facilities are using “guaranteed minimum” contract provisions to maintain profits whether the beds are filled or not.  This contract scheme safeguards profits for private companies while incentivizing the incarceration of immigrants. Problematic partnerships between ICE and local law enforcement only exacerbate the problem, leading to the transfer of immigrants from jails and prisons to immigration detention centers.

Our two-part Social Justice Tuesday Presentations will address the proliferation of immigration detention and showcase stories and strategies of resistance and defiance both locally and nationally.

Tuesday, Nov. 3rd:  Panel 1:  The Problem and The Local Response:
The first panel will help frame our discussion and bring the problem to life. The panel will highlight immigrant activists who were on the front lines of the hunger strikes at the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma.  Their experiences and insights will lay the foundation a legal advocate from the ACLU of Washington to examine the role of lawyers in the detention resistance efforts.  The panel will conclude with the perspective of a community organizer who is engaged in fighting against the privatization of prisons.

Maru Mora Villalpando, Latino Advocacy /Northwest Detention Center Resistance
Maru Mora Villalpando is a bilingual community organizer, consultant and political analyst with more than 10 years of experience working on immigrant rights and racial justice issues. She is the founder of Latino Advocacy Inc. which provides consulting for non-profits in the areas of policy and membership development, workshops and meetings facilitation.

Margaret Chen, ACLU of Washington
Margaret Chen is a Staff Attorney at the ACLU of Washington  She was one of the attorneys that sought a Temporary Restraining Order (TRO) to prohibit U.S. Immigration and Enforcement (ICE) from retaliating against immigration detainees who engage in First Amendment-protected activities by placing them in solitary confinement.  The lawsuit grew out of events at the Northwest Detention Center (NWDC) in Tacoma, Washington.  Several hundred detainees at (NWDC) initiated a hunger strike to express concerns with national immigration policy and to raise awareness about the conditions of their confinement.  In response, ICE began placing individuals in solitary confinement in retaliation for their support of the hunger strikes.

Andrea Lopez-Diaz, Community Organizer, Ending the Prison Industrial Complex/YUIR
Andrea Lopez-Diaz is a community organizer whose woks focuses on prison reform issues in Washington state.

If you would like lunch please RSVP via Symplicity or gatespsl@uw.edu RSVP by 12:00 pm Monday, November 2.

November 12: Fania Davis – Understanding the Intersection of Restorative and Racial Justice

Fania Davis Flyer

Date: Thursday, Nov. 12, 2015
Time: 6:30 PM
Location: Langston Hughes Performing Arts Institute, 104 17th Ave. S., Seattle, WA 98144

FREE ENTRY.  Join us for a casual reception starting at 5:30 PM.  Light refreshments will be served.

Fania Davis is a founder and current Director of RJOY (Restorative Justice for Oakland Youth). She has been active for many decades in the civil rights, Black liberation, women’s, prisoners’, peace, anti-racial violence and anti-apartheid movements.

Founded in 2005, RJOY focuses on reducing racial disparities by promoting restorative approaches that engage families, communities, and systems. Beginning in 2007, RJOY’s West Oakland Middle School pilot project eliminated violence and expulsions, and reduced suspension rates by 87%.

For more information, click here.


December 10 – 13: Early Bird Rates Ends November 6! Register Now for Conference on Advancing Human Rights 2015 – Sharpening Our Vision, Reclaiming Our Dreams

 

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Date: Thursday, Dec. 10, 2015 – Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015
Time: 5:00 AM EST – 5:00 AM EST
Location: Hilton Austin, 500 E. 4th St., Austin, TX 78701

This year’s conference theme is Sharpening our Vision, Reclaiming our Dreams. This theme reflects the deep need to re-center an economic, social and cultural rights (ESCR) agenda as a key component of our movement work. Building off of Martin Luther King, Jr’s Poor People’s Campaign and his understanding that an end to racial oppression requires addressing poverty and all human rights, we seek to re-affirm and elevate the link between inequality, violence, and the criminalization of economically and politically marginalized groups. Effective human rights movement building demands an intersectional approach in which equal attention is given to the role and impact of race, gender and gender identity, economic and social class, sexuality, disability, age, immigration status and other dimensions of our lives.

For more information, click here.

January 15: Save the Date! King County Bar Association Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Annual Luncheon

KCBA 2016 Luncheon Banner

Date: Friday, Jan. 15, 2015
Time: 12:00 PM
Location: Seattle Sheraton Hotel, 1400 Sixth Ave., Seattle, WA

Keynote Speaker: 

C.T. Vivian

Additional Information about C.T. Vivian

  • Legendary Civil Rights Activist
  • Presidential Civil Rights Advisor
  • Founder, C.T. Vivian Leadership Institute

Please join us on January 15 to honor and celebrate Dr. King’s birthday and his legacy.

Questions, please call the KCBA CLE & Events Department at 206.267.7067.

Updates on Immigrant Family Detention in Texas

Immigrants’ Attorneys Say They Were ‘Locked Out’ of Detention Centers After Raising Concerns

CARA Pro Bono Project

By Molly Hennessy-Fiske | Los Angeles Times

Pro bono attorneys working at the country’s two largest immigrant family detention centers in Texas said Monday that they have been “locked out” after they raised concerns last week that officials were forcing the immigrant mothers they represent to sign legal papers without consulting them.

The complaint comes as the Congressional Progressive Caucus and members of the House Judiciary Committee are preparing to hold a forum on family detention Tuesday that’s expected to include testimony from two immigrant women who were detained, a whistle-blower who worked at one of the Texas detention centers and experts on the psychological, developmental and legal implications of family detention.

It also comes after a federal judge in California gave the administration until Aug. 3 to show why she should not hold them to standards for detaining children set out in a 1997 legal settlement, potentially ending family detention.

Continue reading here.  Photo courtesy of the Los Angeles Times video on CARA Pro Bono Project.

Full Time Staff Attorney Position Vacancies & Other Summer Opportunities!

UW Moderate Means Program is Recruiting Interns for Summer and Fall Quarters, Due 6/6

moderate means program

The Moderate Means Program (MMP) is a UW Law in-house pro bono program that is a great way to get experience interviewing lots of clients without having to leave Gates Hall! The goal of the program is to increase access to civil legal services by people of moderate means who cannot afford an attorney but make too much money to qualify for traditional legal aid services. The program is focused on the areas of Family, Housing and Consumer law.

Law students serving as MMP volunteer interns will interview potential clients by telephone to collect information and evaluate their cases. Qualifying cases will be referred by the MMP interns to participating attorneys who have agreed to represent Moderate Means Program clients for a reduced fee. MMP interns will be expected to commit to a minimum of five hours a week for the duration of spring quarter and this summer (one hour is a weekly staff meeting).

For a complete job description and application instructions, click here.

Attention Recent Grads! Catholic Community Services of Western Washington Seeking Staff Attorney

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The Legal Action Center offers free legal assistance to qualifying low income persons in King County who are facing evictions and subsidy terminations, landlord/tenant issues, and debtor/creditor issues related to past tenancies.

In eviction and subsidy termination cases, clients first speak to our staff over the phone to have their case evaluated. Then they may be scheduled for an appointment. Attorneys and paralegals provide free legal assistance ranging from self-help information to representation in court.

This position is responsible for providing legal services to low income households facing eviction, housing subsidy terminations or other barriers to securing suitable housing.

For a full job description and application instructions, click here.

Attention Post Grads!  Northwest Justice Project Seeking Full Time Staff Attorney in Everett With 3+ Years Experience

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The Northwest Justice Project (NJP) is a not-for-profit statewide law firm that pursues its mission through legal representation, community partnerships, and education to combat injustice and promote the long-term well-being of low-income individuals, families, and communities throughout Washington.  NJP seeks applications from qualified attorneys committed to supporting our mission through the work of our Everett regional office.

Successful applicants for this position will have experience in all aspects of civil litigation, with a minimum of 3 years in family law, preferably in Washington State.  Experience preferred in one or more additional areas of law that particularly impact low income persons. Applicants should be culturally competent and have demonstrated experience working with low-income client communities. Washington State Bar Association membership in good standing, the ability to acquire membership through reciprocity, or ability to take the next Washington bar exam is required.  Significant civil legal aid and/or civil litigation experience is strongly preferred.

For a full job description and application instructions, click here.

Transgender Law Center Seeking 2014 Immigration Detention Law Clerk

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Transgender Law Center works to change law, policy, and attitudes so that all people can live safely, authentically, and free from discrimination regardless of their gender identity or expression. Through a Soros Justice Fellowship, Olga Tomchin has started an Immigration Detention project at Transgender Law Center to challenge the inhumane treatment of indigent transgender people in immigration detention and improve their access to quality deportation defense representation.

A clerkship with the Immigration Detention project at Transgender Law Center will provide selected law students with a unique opportunity to gain a first-hand education in the intersection of transgender law, immigrants’ rights, and anti-incarceration work. Clerks will receive close training and supervision by Transgender Law Center attorneys.

For a complete job description and application instructions, click here.

Transgender Law Center Seeking Fall 2014 Legal Intern

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Transgender Law Center works to change law, policy, and attitudes so that all people can live safely, authentically, and free from discrimination regardless of their gender identity or expression.

Transgender Law Center provides legal assistance and information to more than 2,200 transgender people and their families each year, and also engages in selective high-impact litigation to advance transgender rights, such as the recent groundbreaking EEOC decision in our case Macy v. Holder.

A clerkship with Transgender Law Center will provide selected law students with a unique opportunity to gain a first-hand education in transgender law through providing direct legal assistance to transgender community members and their families, assisting with litigation, conducting legal research and writing, and participating in creating new legal publications. Prior experience or knowledge of transgender law is preferred, but not required. Clerks will receive regular training and supervision by Transgender Law Center attorneys.

For a complete job description and application instructions, click here.

Attention Post Grads!  Columbia Legal Services Seeking Adjunct Attorney in Its Children & Youth  Project in Olympia, 2+ Years Experience Required

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For many years, Columbia Legal Services has represented some of the most marginalized people in our community. We use every legal tool available on their behalf. Our role to serve people and use advocacy that might otherwise not be available makes our work an integral part of the Washington Alliance for Equal Justice. As a proud member of the Alliance, our vision of justice is when people have the necessary tools and opportunity to achieve social and economic justice, a more equitable and inclusive society is possible. Every day, our legal teams engage in advocacy intended to make a lasting difference so that all people can be meaningful members of their communities. Through large-scale litigation, policy reform, and innovative partnerships, our lawyers and staff work in furtherance of our mission. We share a deep commitment to serve and advocate alongside our clients as we seek justice together.

Columbia Legal Services seeks an attorney with experience in child welfare, education, or juvenile justice cases. The position is full-time and will be based in our Olympia office. Applicant must be willing to travel to the Seattle office throughout the year. This is an adjunct, twelve-month position, with possible extension depending on funding. Job responsibilities include policy advocacy in the legislative and administrative forums, and litigation. Applicant must be a member of the Washington State Bar.

For a complete job description and application instructions, click here