Choc Full O’ Important Training Opportunities!

June 14: Sin País (Without Country) Documentary Film Screening

sinpais

Tuesday, June 14th, 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

Fenwick & West, 1191 2nd Ave, 10th Floor, Nisqually Room, Seattle, WA 98101

Please join us for on June 14 at noon at Fenwick and West’s Nisqually Room for lunch and a screening of Sin País (Without Country), a striking 20-minute film about a real family from Guatemala whose lives in Marin County are suddenly fractured by deportation. Following the screening there will be a Q&A with the filmmaker and one of the family members featured in the film, as well as a short presentation by nonprofit attorneys regarding how Fenwick volunteers can help out on pro bono cases for families in need representation in their immigration cases.

  • Melody Young, Pro Bono Attorney, Kids In Need of Defense (KIND)
  • Renée Schomp, Equal Justice Works Fellow Sponsored by Fenwick & West and Staff Attorney at OneJustice

RSVP by emailing probonoregistration@fenwick.com for Seattle screening. Add to your calendar

June 16: Free Webinar- Drowning in Debt! What Law Students & Lawyers Need to Know about Managing Student Debt & Earning Loan Forgiveness

EJW Educational Debt Relief

Thursday, Jun 16, 2016 12:00 PM – 1:05 PM PDT

A must attend for anyone with student debt, this free webinar explains how to reduce your monthly student loan payments and qualify for Public Service Loan Forgiveness.

For further information on borrowing, repaying and earning forgiveness on student loans, download our free e-book, “Take Control of Your Future,” at EqualJusticeWorks.org/ed-debt/ebook.

Register here.

June 17: Attention Attorneys! Be a volunteer lawyer for a Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA)

PRO BONO TRAINING DEPENDENCY CASA- 8:30 am – 12 noon. Room Still Available!

Perkins Coie LLP, 1201 Third Avenue Suite 4900, Seattle, WA 98101-3099

CLE credits pending

casa pro bono training

June 15: Law & Liberty CLE- Transgender Rights & Public Accomodations

ACLU of WA 

Wednesday, June 15, Noon – 1pm

901 Fifth Avenue, Suite 630
Seattle, WA 98164

This ACLU-sponsored event will cover Washington State legal protections for transgender individuals, as well as the legal implications of the current political backlash. Jennifer Shaw, the ACLU of Washington’s Deputy Director; and Denise Diskin, an attorney with Teller & Associates, will present. This event will take place at the ACLU office in Seattle and is open to all attorneys .

$5 Registration Fee. Lunch provided. 1 General CLE credit. Space is limited. Register here to reserve your seat!

June 17: Asylum for Unaccompanied Immigrant Children: Training by Kids in Need of Defense – Free 1.0 Law & Legal CLE Credit (Pending)

KIND Logo

Friday, June 17th, 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

Fenwick & West, 1191 2nd Avenue, 10th Floor, Seattle, WA 98101

Please join us for a 60-minute presentation that teaches the essentials of working with children in their asylum claims.  Following the training, there will be an opportunity for volunteers to sign up for pro bono cases for children in need of representation in their immigration cases.  It’s a chance to make an immense difference for a child who would otherwise face complex proceedings pro se.  For more details, please see the attached flyer.

RSVP by COB on June 16 to Julie Park at jjpark@fenwick.com.

 

City of Seattle releases “Race & Social Justice Community Survey”

New CAGJ Webinar: “Linking Food Justice to Trade Policy”

3815441846_4f038805b5_o_dWebinar: “Linking Food Justice to Trade Policy”
A 30 min. webinar (on you-tube) about how food justice and food sovereignty are threatened by new (so-called) free-trade agreements,  the TPP/Trans-Pacific Partnership, and TTIP/Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership.
Background:

  • About Food Sovereignty & Fair Trade, What is Fair about Free Trade? What is Fast Track?
  • Corporate Influence on Free Trade Agreements (FTAs), Impacts of NAFTA on Mexico, FTAs and the Domestic Economy, Currently proposed Trade Agreements

After Overpayment Of Benefits, VA Wanted $38,000 Back – Patricia Murphy

clayhull-2015-8edit_custom-afe9e1889c09769894f8e31e7c7abe20fabeafa0-s800-c85Clay Hull has a stubborn sense of justice.

After an improvised explosive device blast in Iraq ended his time in the military, he fought the Army and the Department of Veterans Affairs over the amount of compensation they awarded him for his injuries.

“If I’m in the wrong, I’ll admit it. But I’m not going to let somebody just push me around, especially the VA,” he says.

It was complicated and drawn out, but Hull now gets the maximum the VA pays for disability.

The money pays for his mortgage, support for his young son and feed for the livestock on Hull’s 3 acres in south central Washington — 2 1/2 hours from Seattle.

He has a day job as a shipping clerk and then comes home to work on his place. He’s currently fixing a fence that runs along his property line.

Four years after he moved in, Hull went to prison on a weapons charge. Hull notified the VA he was in prison.

Continue reading here

Photo credit: Gordon King for NPR

AP: Feds imperiled many migrant kids during surge

4556659182_c4981bc62d_o_dLOS ANGELES — As tens of thousands of children fleeing violence in Central America crossed the border in search of safe harbor, overwhelmed U.S. officials weakened child protection policies, placing some young migrants in homes where they were sexually assaulted, starved or forced to work for little or no pay, an Associated Press investigation has found.

Without enough beds to house the record numbers of young arrivals, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services lowered its safety standards during border surges in the last three years to swiftly move children out of government shelters and into sponsors’ homes. The procedures were increasingly relaxed as the number of young migrants rose in response to spiraling gang and drug violence in Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador, according to emails, agency memos and operations manuals obtained by AP, some under the Freedom of Information Act.

First, the government stopped fingerprinting most adults seeking to claim the children. In April 2014, the agency stopped requiring original copies of birth certificates to prove most sponsors’ identities. The next month, it decided not to complete forms that request sponsors’ personal and identifying information before sending many of the children to sponsors’ homes. Then, it eliminated FBI criminal history checks for many sponsors.

Continue reading here.

Photo credit: https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3498/4556659182_c4981bc62d_o_d.jpg

It’s here! The Race and Social Justice Community Survey

official_seal_of_seattle The City of Seattle wants to hear from YOU! Seattle has launched its second Race and Social Justice Community Survey. The survey measures how people who live, work or go to school in Seattle think the City is doing on jobs, housing, meeting community needs and race and equity. The information collected will help guide the City’s racial equity work and determine areas for City government to prioritize through its policies and programs. The survey is anonymous and takes about 12 minutes to complete.

Take the survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/RSJCommunitysurvey 

The survey runs for three weeks from January 13th through Friday, February 5th. To ensure representation from Seattle’s diverse communities and those without access to the internet, the Seattle Office for Civil Rights is conducting targeted outreach and partnering with community organizations. The survey is also available in Spanish, Vietnamese, Korean, Amharic, Somali, Oromo and Chinese. The links to translated surveys will be available starting the week of Jan 19th at http://www.seattle.gov/rsji/community/survey.

Survey results will be shared at a community meeting in the spring of 2015. 

To learn more visit www.seattle.gov/rsji or contact Brenda Anibarro at (206) 684-4514 or email Brenda.Anibarro@Seattle.gov