Attention Recent Grads! Snohomish County Public Defender Association Seeking Entry-Level Attorney

API Chaya Seeking Legal Intern for Fall/Winter Quarters, Paid Position, Open Until Filled

API Chaya Logo

API Chaya is seeking a legal intern committed to a minimum of six months with our organization. The intern will work approximately 10-20 hours/week and will be required to complete extensive training on domestic violence and sexual assault before working with survivors.

A $2500 stipend is provided, funded by the South Asian Bar Association of WA. Applicants must be pursuing degrees or career paths in legal work or currently enrolled in law school. If students make a commitment of 2 quarters/semesters, they may independently explore the possibility of receiving a stipend for one quarter/semester and arrange for school credit for the other.

For more information, click here.

American Civil Liberties Union Seeking Voter-Engagement Advocate, Full Time Position, Limited Term

ACLU of WA

The American Civil Liberties Union of Washington (ACLU-WA) is seeking a Yakima-based Voter Engagement Advocate.

Voting among Latinos in Yakima has been low because the system of voting for the City Council did not provide Latinos an opportunity to elect individuals of their choosing.  As a result of a recent lawsuit brought by the ACLU-WA, the election of Yakima City Council members has been restructured into seven single member districts, two of which are largely Latino.  The ACLU-WA wishes to help the community educate Latino voters about the importance of voting, voter eligibility, and how to register to vote.  The Voter Engagement Advocate is part of the Field Department, and is supervised by the Field Director based in Seattle.  The Voter Engagement Advocate will be responsible for implementing our non-partisan voter education campaign to engage new voters in the upcoming 2015 City of Yakima elections.

For more information, click here.

Attention 2Ls & 3Ls! Bayview Hunters Point Community Legal Seeks UW Law Interns for Fall or Winter, Position Open Until Filled

Bayview/Hunters Point Community Legal Photo

Litigation Interns are a vital part of our mission to ensure universal access to civil representation for everyone in San Francisco’s highest need neighborhoods. We operate as a general counsel for the neighborhood, helping people with legal issues in over three dozen practice areas.

In our litigation program, you will assist our senior staff attorney in litigation cases that impact many community members. Currently, we are looking for help in a potential suit against a housing provider for fraudulently embezzling hundreds of thousands of dollars owned by low-income residents. Possible assignments include interviewing clients and witnesses, investigation and analysis of records and legal documents, drafting memoranda, drafting pleadings and motions, obtaining declarations, and propounding and responding to discovery. We value interns who are passionate about access to civil justice, self-motivated, and have strong client service and project management skills.

To apply, fill out the volunteer form here and email a cover letter and resume to Adrian Tirtanadi, Executive Director.

For more information, click here.

Human Rights First Seeking Advocacy Counsel

Human Rights First Logo

Human Rights First is an independent advocacy and action organization that challenges America to live up to its ideals.  The Advocacy Counsel, Refugee Protection is responsible for developing and implementing strategies to advance Human Rights First’s objectives to protect the rights of refugees. S/he will develop plans to persuade policy makers to adopt the Human Rights First’s proposals drawing on resources from across the organization including Human Rights First’s experts in refugee policy, the organization’s communications team, other members of the government relations department, the refugee representation team, and the organization’s leadership.  The Advocacy Counsel will be Human Rights First’s lead liaison on refugee protection issues to the Department of State, Justice, and Homeland Security, the corresponding Congressional committees, Congressional leadership, and other decision makers as necessary, working with other team members.

For more information, click here.

Legal Services Corporation (LSC) Seeking Government Relations & Public Affairs Intern for Fall 2015, Paid Position

LSC Logo

Legal Services Corporation (LSC) is an independent nonprofit established by Congress in 1974 to provide financial support for civil legal aid to low-income Americans. The Corporation currently provides funding to 134 independent non-profit legal aid programs in every state, the District of Columbia, and U.S. Territories.

LSC is accepting applications from current undergraduate, graduate, and law school students.  Ideal candidates can work independently, will have excellent research and writing skills and an interest in public service, government or congressional affairs, public affairs or communications. Should have a good understanding of social media and working knowledge of Microsoft Office projects (e.g., Word, Excel, PowerPoint).  The internship will run from September – December 2015.

For more information, click here.

State of Oregon’s Department of Consumer and Business Services Seeking Operations and Policy Analyst 3 (Contested Case Representative), Due 8/7

State of Oregon Seal

The Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS) is a progressive business regulatory state agency dedicated to the mission of protecting and serving Oregon’s consumers and workers while supporting a positive business climate.  The successful candidates will represent the division throughout the contested case hearing process, including making recommendations to the administrator and boards for handling of cases, preparing appropriate filings and notices, conducting alternative dispute resolution and coordinating with respondents and the Office of Administrative Hearings. In certain instances the individual represents the division during a contested case hearing.

For more information, click here.

East Bay Community Law Center Seeking Staff Attorney/Clinical Supervisor, Due 8/9

EBCLC Logo

The Health & Welfare Practice of the East Bay Community Law Center (EBCLC) is seeking a Staff Attorney/Clinical Supervisor to provide representation and advocacy on behalf of low-income individuals and families assisted through our medical-legal partnerships with East Bay hospitals and our weekly Public Benefits Clinic, and to assist with the training and supervision of law student interns. The ideal candidate is a strong legal advocate with excellent case management and organizational skills; experience in public benefits advocacy; interest in training law students; and a passion for working with low-income people.

EBCLC is a non-profit organization founded in 1988 to provide high quality legal services to low-income clients and educational opportunities for law students and community volunteers. As UC Berkeley Law School’s community-based clinic, EBCLC is currently the largest provider of free legal services for low-income residents in the East Bay, with a staff of 40 and an annual roster of 150 law student interns providing services to 5,000 clients each year.

For more information, click here.

City of Seattle’s Office of Sustainability and Environment Seeking Food Access Planner, Due 8/11

City of Seattle Logo

The Office of Sustainability and Environment (OSE) was established as an executive office in 2000 to develop and coordinate environmental policies and programs. As the Food Access Planner, you will strategically grow the Fresh Bucks program to increase access to healthy food for low-income families. Through strategic planning and partnerships, project management, communication and outreach, and collaboration with internal and community partners, you will increase use of the program, expand locations where affordable healthy food is available, and develop leading-edge strategies to increase fruit and vegetable consumption among low-income households.  You will lead OSE’s Fresh Bucks work and also be responsible for managing OSE’s role as the lead partner for Seattle and King County in a recently awarded federal grant, including oversight of federal and matching funds, working closely with the grant lead (Washington State Dept. of Health) and other statewide sub-awardees, and managing implementation and evaluation activities.  This is a key opportunity to develop and manage a program to increase equitable outcomes in our City.

For more information, click here.

Snohomish County Public Defender Association Seeking Level I Attorney, Due 8/14

Snohomish County PDA

Under general supervision, the Level 1 Attorney represents indigents in criminal cases filed in Snohomish County District Court and Mental Health Civil Commitments.  The Level 1 Attorney must have experience or demonstrated commitment to defending and working with indigent people.

Applicants should send a cover letter and resume to Sara Wilson.  Applicants selected for interviews will also need to submit references and a writing sample.

For more information, click here.

City of Seattle Seeking Deputy Director for Office of Immigrant & Refugee Affairs, Position Open Until Filled

City of Seattle Logo

The Seattle Office of Immigrant and Refugee Affairs (OIRA) was established in 2012 with the mission to facilitate the successful integration of immigrants and refugees into Seattle’s civic, economic, cultural, and linguistic life. To realize our goals and objectives, we have an opportunity to bring in an innovative and experienced Deputy Director who will help OIRA build equity for immigrant and refugee communities in Seattle and establish Seattle as a leader in immigrant integration.

You will develop an innovative growth plan for OIRA to ensure the equitable inclusion of immigrant and refugee needs across all City programs and policies, including preschool, employment, economic development, transit, parks, public safety, and the protection of civil rights, among many others. You’ll use your policy analysis, political judgment and legislative advocacy to address the existing and emerging needs of immigrants and refugees. You will have the opportunity to lead engagement strategies across all OIRA programs and build strong relationships with stakeholders across the City, helping to create an environment that welcomes the participation and engagement of immigrants and refugees in all areas. You will work with the Mayor’s Office and City Council to advance the mission of OIRA.

For more information, click here.

US Department of Justice is Hiring Paid Summer Interns & Entry-Level Attorneys!

DOJ

The online application for the Attorney General’s Honors Program (HP) and the Summer Law Intern Program (SLIP) opens July 31, 2015.  The deadline for law students and eligible graduates to apply is Tuesday, September 8, 2015.  Honors Program information and a link to the application is here.  SLIP information and a link to the application is here.  Details regarding the participating components, program eligibility guidelines, and application instructions can be found here.

Have you Already Secured a Summer Internship doing Social Justice Work? Don’t Miss Out on an Early Application for Funding

On Human Rights Day, UN Official Calls for Member States to ‘Stamp Out Torture’

Jean-Marc Ferre

By: UN News Centre

10 December 2014 – Governments must ramp up their efforts in eradicating the practice of torture and compensate the victims of this “most vicious of crimes,” the top United Nations human rights official has urged, as he marked the 30th anniversary of the adoption of the Convention against Torture.

In a press statement issued today following the release of two “ground-breaking” reports – one from the United States and another from Brazil – on the use of torture by both Governments, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, called on all Member States “to act unequivocally” in stamping out the practice.

“Today is not only Human Rights Day,” Mr. Zeid said, as he recalled the UN-backed observance commemorating the date on which the General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, “it is also the 30th anniversary of the adoption of the Convention against Torture on 10 December 1984.”

“Yet, as yesterday’s US Senate Select Committee on Intelligence report shows, torture is still taking place in quite a few of the 156 countries that have ratified the Convention against Torture and have domestic legislation making it illegal.”

Continue reading here. Photo credit: UN Photo/Jean-Marc Ferré

2015 Haywood Burns Memorial Fellowship for Social and Economic Justice, Applications Due 1/12/15

Haywood Burns

The Haywood Burns Fellowships are designed to encourage students to work in the National Lawyer’s Guild’s tradition of “people’s lawyering.” The program exists to help students apply their talents and skills to find creative ways to use the law to advance justice. Burns Fellowships provoke law students to question traditional notions of how one must practice law and to provide a summer experience that will enrich and challenge them.

Over the years, the Summer Projects program has expanded to place hundreds of students with public interest organizations working to protect and further the civil rights of oppressed people in the United States. Although providing legal work under the direction of their attorney-organizers is important, the primary mission of the summer projects is to strengthen each student’s long-term commitment to promote justice and equality. Fellows have worked with groups to provide legal, political, and educational support on a wide variety of issues, including voting rights; union democracy; workplace health and safety; the death penalty and prison reform; lesbian/gay/bisexual/trans rights; defense of protesters from police harassment and criminal sanctions; and international human rights.

For more information, click here.

Human Rights Essay Award: Call for Submissions, Due 2/1/15

WCL

Are you interested in attending an all-expense paid 3 week summer program on Human Rights and Humanitarian Law taught by over 39 world-renowned practitioners and academics at American University Washington College of Law? Well, now is your chance! Submit an essay to the Human Rights Essay Award Competition and you could be the lucky winner to receive a scholarship to attend the 2015 Program of Advanced Studies in Human Rights and Humanitarian Law. This year’s topic is “Transitional Justice, International Human Rights and Humanitarian Law” and the deadline to submit is February 1, 2015. Participants have the flexibility to choose any subject related to the assigned topic. The best articles may be published in the American University International Law Review.

This annual competition sponsored by the Academy on Human Rights and Humanitarian Law seeks to stimulate the production of scholarly work in international human rights law. The Academy will grant two Awards, one for the best article in English and one for the best article in Spanish. The Award in each case will consist of: a scholarship to the Academy’s Program of Advanced Studies, travel expenses to Washington D.C., housing at the university dorms and a per diem for living expenses.

For detailed guidelines about the award, click here.

Attention US Citizens! David L. Boren Fellowship, Applications Due 1/27/15

boren-logo

The David L. Boren Fellowship provides a unique funding opportunity for U.S. students to study in world regions critical to U.S. interests (Africa, Asia, Central & Eastern Europe, Eurasia, Latin America, and the Middle East).  Boren Fellows receive up to $24,000 for overseas study or up to $30,000 for a combination of overseas and domestic study.

Deadline: January 27, 2015 at 2:00 PM (PST)

For UW Information Session Webinars: December 9, 2014 and January 6, 2015.  Register online here.

For more information, click here.

 

New Public Defender Career Handbook, Networking Opportunities & Human Rights News

Interested in Career in Public Defense? Check out the Newly Updated Public Defender Handbook

PDlogo

PSJD.org recently published NYU’s 2014 Public Defender Handbook. One of the most comprehensive career handbooks around this guide will walk you through all of the nuts and bolts of building a career in public defense. Don’t miss out!

 

Are you Looking for Any Easy Way to Network with UW Law Alumni? Regional Networking Groups are Now Available Online!

networkingUW Law alumni extend across the country and internationally. Regional alumni groups allow alumni and students in these regions to stay connected with each other and the law school. Check out the regional networking groups here.

Friendly Networking Tips:

  1. before you contact alumni be sure to research them to learn more about their practice area.
  2. when you do email them, be sure to mention that you got their contact info from the UW regional networking group link.
  3. if you don’t get a response right away don’t worry, it might be a busy time for them. Give it some time and a couple of tries. Persistence usually pays off. Otherwise, just contact another regional member!

Attention Law Grads! Announcing the 2015 Human Rights Essay Award

HR essay award

 

Uganda Court Annuls Anti-Homosexuality Law

Isaac KasamaniAugust 1, 2014- BBC News, photo courtesy of Isaac Kasamani/ AFP/ Getty

Activists celebrated after the anti-gay law was thrown out, reports Andrew Harding. Uganda’s Constitutional Court has annulled tough anti-gay legislation signed into law in February. It ruled that the bill was passed by MPs in December without the requisite quorum and was therefore illegal. Homosexual acts were already illegal, but the new law allowed for life imprisonment for “aggravated homosexuality” and banned the “promotion of homosexuality”. Several donors have cut aid to Uganda since the law was adopted.

Ugandan government spokesperson Ofwono Opondo said the government was still waiting the attorney general’s advice about whether to challenge the ruling in the Supreme Court. He added that the ruling showed to Western donors that Uganda’s democracy was functioning very well and that they should reinstate any aid they had cut. Continue reading here.

Advocates for Children, Families Oppose Cuts to Services to Fund McCleary

 

CLS Logo

August 4, 2014 – Columbia Legal Services

Advocates for children and families have filed an Amicus Curiae brief with the state Supreme Court, opposing one of the Court’s proposed remedies in the McCleary v. Washington case.

The Children’s Alliance, Columbia Legal Services, and the Washington Low Income Housing Alliance filed the brief this morning. The brief requests that, as the state moves to comply with the Court’s ruling, it refrain from funding education in a way that jeopardizes housing and other basic services to children and families. The brief may be found here.

“If we cut social programs to pay for education, everyone’s worse off,” says Paola Maranan, executive director of the Children’s Alliance. “In addressing our failure to uphold kids’ right to a basic education, we don’t want the solution to exacerbate the problem.”

While education must be fully funded, the brief explains how students in low-income families face barriers outside the classroom that prevent them from obtaining a basic education. These barriers also expand the educational opportunity gap that exists between white students and students of color.

In the brief, the organizations explain how, even with the existing level of funding for social programs, students in low-income families and students of color often cannot achieve educational opportunity. Thus, the organizations argue, financing education by cutting or freezing basic services would exacerbate the barriers to education that students in low-income families and students of color already face.

Housing advocates assert the legislature has already cut to the bone funding for both housing and homelessness services. For instance, the State Housing Trust Fund has declined sharply since 2008. This important tool for creating affordable homes received zero dollars this most recent legislative session. Cutting programs could not have come at a worse time, as students in homeless households are at an all-time high. The Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction reported 30,609 homeless students in the 2012-13 school year.

“For children across Washington, the lack of a safe, stable home can be a huge barrier to learning,” says Housing Alliance executive director Rachael Myers. “We already have proven, innovative programs that create affordable homes and keep families and children stably housed. They just need to be adequately funded.”

“Every child deserves an opportunity to succeed,” adds Maranan. “Good nutrition, household economic stability, child care, health care: these help keep kids in school, body and mind.”

Another Amicus brief was filed today by the Washington State Budget & Policy Center and six co-signing organizations. Their brief argues that legislators cannot responsibly fund education without raising new revenue, and that failure to raise revenue will lead to budget cuts that will harm kids’ ability to succeed in the classroom.

The Amicus participants support the Court’s finding in McCleary that the state must provide adequate funding to ensure the right of all children to an education that prepares them for lifelong success.

 

 

Great News! Post Graduate Short Term Public Service Funding Deadline Extended!

Post Graduate Short Term Public Service Funding 2014 Deadline Extended

Summer Funding

The Post-Graduate Fellowship Program was initiated in 2013 and seeks to support new UW law graduates who are seeking employment, and who wish to provide legal services for underserved populations, by providing limited financial support while Fellows continue to search for permanent positions after the bar exam. This support will allow Fellows to continue to develop skills, contacts, and professional experience through short-term volunteer work, enabling them to better compete for permanent positions once they become available.

Each fellow must volunteer with an eligible sponsor organization, doing work that requires a JD or draws heavily on the Fellow’s legal education and training. Eligible work may include, for example, legal advocacy, direct legal services, impact litigation, or community education and organizing.

Fellowship awards will consist of a maximum of $1500 per Fellow, renewable on a monthly basis, for a maximum of four months (up to $6000 total). Fellowships must begin between August 1, 2014 and September 30, 2014, and may end no later than January 31, 2015.

Fellowships will end when the Fellow finds a permanent position or at the end of the four-month fellowship period, whichever comes sooner. Recipients and sponsoring agencies will be required to certify that they will adhere to each of the goals and guidelines of the Fellowship program. The University of Washington School of Law is accepting applications from June 2014 graduates for a limited number of short-term, post-graduate Fellowships. Applications can be accessed on Symplicity and must be uploaded to Symplicity no later than Sunday, May 11, 2014 at 11:59 p.m.

Questions? Contact Dean Storms.

Today is the Last Day to Apply for Position Opening as Eastside Policy and Government Affairs Manager for Cascade Bicycle Club

Cascade-Bicycle-Club

The Eastside Policy and Government Affairs Manager informs, develops and implements Cascade’s Eastside advocacy efforts. The Eastside Manager is expected to track and influence major, non­motorized policy and funding decisions at the regional and city level (including priority cities of Redmond, Kirkland, Bellevue).

The manager will serve as the main voice of Cascade members on the Eastside. The Manager will have expertise in community organizing, transportation or legislative policy and strategy, and use that expertise to mobilize others to support bicycle friendly policies, infrastructure, and funding decisions. The Eastside Policy and Government Affairs Manager will work directly with local, regional, and state elected officials and staff to collaboratively develop a better community through bicycling.

For a complete job description and application details, click here.

NLG Releases Report on Government Spying on Legal Profession, Launches FBI FOIA Project

NLG Logo

By Tasho Moro, Communications Coordinator, National Lawyers Guild

A new report by the National Lawyers Guild (NLG),Breach of Privilege: Spying on Lawyers in the United Statesbrings to light the government’s long history of covert surveillance of attorneys and their activist clients. The release also marks the launch of a new NLG Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) project that seeks to recover FBI files on individual Guild members as exposed by the 1977 case, National Lawyers Guild v. Attorney General of the United States.

From 1940-1975, the FBI, CIA and other government agencies spied on, infiltrated and disrupted the NLG and its members. Even though no alleged or suspected criminal wrongdoing existed to justify governmental intrusion, the FBI illegally recorded privileged conversations of members, led media smear campaigns against the NLG, and even inserted informants posing as NLG staff – all resulting in significant financial and organizational damage to the Guild.

Continue reading here.

Abu Ghraib’s Ghosts: Ten Years Later, the United States Still Hasn’t Come Clean on Its Torture Record

Demonstrators Protest Bush Administration's International Human Rights Reco

Photo courtesy of Politico Magazine. Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images.

By Juan E. Mendez, Politico Magazine

en years ago today, “60 Minutes II” broadcast infamous pictures of detainee abuse at Abu Ghraib, the Iraqi prison then controlled by the United States. The photographs were heartbreaking. Naked men stacked up on top of each other in human pyramids. Prisoners forcibly staged in humiliating positions to mimic sex acts. Bags placed over men’s heads, denying their humanity. The most memorable image — a hooded man standing on a box, contorted Crucifixion-like with wires protruding from his hands — remains an indelible reminder that a country that long abhorred torture practiced it after the Sept. 11 attacks.

Those pictures shattered my belief that well-established democracies do not torture. I am a survivor of torture who owes his release from the Argentine junta’s notorious Unit 9 prison in part to U.S. pressure in the 1970s. If U.S. citizens and certain members of Congress had not written letters to the Argentine government inquiring about my situation, I might have become one of the thousands of people “disappeared” by the Argentine military in its Dirty War against political activists like me. I owe my life to the solidarity those Americans showed and their principled opposition to the military’s machinery of death and torture.

Continue reading here.

Did You Know?  The Asian Bar Association of Washington Offers Free Membership to Law Students

ABAW Logo

Law students may join the Asian Bar Association of Washington for free.  Membership in the Asian Bar Association could provide you with many benefits.  It has a great list serve that includes job announcements.  In fact, one of the job announcements I sent out today came from their list serve. It also holds events that will give you an opportunity to meet practicing lawyers. See highlighted section below re membership for students and check out their website.

Law students must email Sieu Che and indicate that they are students in lieu of sending payment.

Public Forums, Conferences, Workshops, and Celebrations Galore!

February 10: Career Services Presents Career Opportunities with the United States Department of State

DOS International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Seal

University of Washington School of Law, RM 127
Monday, February 10, 2014
12:30 – 1:20 PM

Presenters include:
Erin Lane, Foreign Affairs Officer, Bureau of International Narcotics & Law Enforcement Affairs, (INL) Office of Afghanistan & Pakistan

Katie Blanchette, Legal Advisor, Afghanistan Economic Growth and Governance Initiative

For a full description of the presenters’ profiles, click here.

February 11: Social Justice Tuesday- Legal Aid, Law Students & Low Income Veterans

SJTlogo

Tuesday February 11, Room 133, 12:30-1:20PM

Hosted by: Center for Public Service Law

12.44% of Washington adults are veterans and the Department of Veterans Affairs is the second largest federal department in our government, yet few public interest lawyers have a chance to learn about the unique legal and cultural considerations that affect so many of our fellow persons and so much of our government. 22 veterans commit suicide everyday across our nation, and lawyers have an essential role to play in saving those lives. Please join three recent law school graduates and current legal fellows as they discuss:

  • Legal and cultural considerations for representing low-income veterans
  • Existing organizations that assist low-income veterans
  • How law students can get involved with Equal Justice Works, AmeriCorps and Northwest Justice Project to help veterans and gain legal experience

 Panelists:

  • Adam Chromy, Equal Justice Works AmeriCorps Veterans Legal Fellow (NJP Seattle)
  • Michelle Miller, Equal Justice Works AmeriCorps Veterans Legal Fellow (NJP Everett)
  • Leo Flor, Equal Justice Works Fellow sponsored by Microsoft and Fenwick & West LLP (NJP Seattle)

If you would like lunch please RSVP via Symplicity or gatespsl@uw.edu  by 12:00 pm Monday, February10, 2014. No RSVP for lunch accepted after 12:00 pm.

February 12: Public Forum of Policy Experts & Advocates on The Shrinking Child Safety Net

Photo Courtesy of Westside Baby

University of Washington School of Law, RM 115
Wednesday, Feb. 12, 2014
3:00 – 4:00 PM

Panelists include:

  • Lisa A. Kelly, Bobbe & Jon Bridge Professor of Child Advocacy; Director, Children and Youth Advocacy Clinic, University of Washington School of Law
  • Joanne Goldblum, Executive Director, National Diaper Bank Network
  • Lois Schipper, Supervisor, Public Health – Seattle and King County
  • Alison Carl White, Executive Director, WithinReach
  • Nancy Woodland (Moderator), Executive Director, WestSide Baby

February 21: UW Law’s Native American Law Students Association Invites You to Attend Their Salmon Bingo Dinner!

(c) Android Bingo Thursday, February 21, 2013
6:00 – 8:30 PM
Samuel E. Kelly Ethnic Cultural Center, Unity Ballroom 3931 Brooklyn Avenue NE, Seattle, WA 98195

NALSA presents its Salmon Bingo Dinner.  Tickets are only $10.00 for a traditional salmon dinner.  Bingo to follow.  The event is family friendly, and children are welcome! Tickets will begin selling in the UW Law School lobby starting Monday, February 10, 2014.

For over 30 years, NALSA-UW has supported both Native and non-Native students pursuing legal careers in Indian Law by bringing speakers to campus, reaching out to tribes and Native undergrad, and high school students, sending law students to Indian Law Moot Court Competitions and conferences.

March 21-22: Southwestern Law School, Los Angeles Invites You to Attend the Trina Grillo Retreat 2014, RSVP by 2/24

Friday, Mar. 21 & Saturday, Mar. 22, 2014

UW Law students interested in attending should RSVP directly to Dean Storms at mestorms@uw.edu no later February 24. Travel assistance may be available from the Center for Public Service Law.

2014 Trina Gillo

March 1-2: SU Law Institute Invites You to Law & War: An International Humanitarian Law Workshop!  Registration Ends 2/24

SU Law Logo

Saturday, Mar. 1 – Sunday, Mar 2, 2014
American Red Cross, Seattle Office
1900 25th Ave South; Seattle, WA 98114

This workshop features lectures and hands-on exercises that guide participants through an intensive examination of International Humanitarian Law (IHL) with a focus on its application to combatants and civilians. Sessions will be led by law professors, military professionals, and non-governmental organizations. Topics include: Protections for individuals under IHL, Means and Methods of Warfare, Enforcement IHL, Non-state Actors, Direct Participation in Hostilities, and Targeted Killings.

The workshop is available to full– and part–time law students who are attending a U.S. or Canadian law school as of the date of the program. Students will be expected to attend all sessions of the entire program. Students who complete the workshop will receive a Certificate of Completion.

Cost of attendance is $20.00.  Register here.

March 13: Save the Date!  RSVP for Perkins Coie’s Attorneys with Disabilities Celebration

Perkins Coie Logo

Thursday, Mar. 13, 2014
Perkins Coie LLP, 1201 3rd Ave, 49th Floor
5:30 – 7:30 PM
6:15  PM – Speakers’ Remarks

Please join us and our friends with the Washington Attorneys with Disabilities Association as we gather to celebrate the one-year anniversary of Perkins Coie signing the ABA’s Pledge for Change regarding disability diversity in the legal profession. We’ll be enjoying good food and great company as clients, community leaders, and friends of the firm recognize the accomplishments and contributions of attorneys with disabilities.

Please RSVP here.

March 15: National Lawyers Guild Invites You to Join its 2014 Northwest Regional Conference in Portland, Oregon!

NLG Logo

The 2014 National Lawyers Guild conference for the Northwest region (Oregon, Idaho, Washington, Montana, and Alaska) will be held at Lewis and Clark Law School in Portland, Oregon, on March 15, 2014. The conference is a gathering of Guild members from the region—legal workers, law students, and lawyers*—at which we make decisions about regional governance, share victories and resources, and learn more about the important work Guild members are doing in the northwest.

There will be three workshops, and lunch will be provided. Please register now so that we can order the right amount of food! Admission is $10-50, sliding scale (based on ability to pay) and paid at the door, to cover conference costs and support our regional NLG efforts.  We hope to offer CLE credit! Please watch this space for updates.

For more information, click here.