Check out UW Law alum, Nikkita Oliver, on “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert”

Columbia Legal Services: Student Homelessness Across Washington State Increases 9%: Approximately 1 in 30 students homeless

columbia20legal20servicesSEATTLE – This week, the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) reported that 35,511 students were homeless in the 2014-15 school year–a 9.1 % increase from the previous year. This alarming increase underscores the enormous scope of the challenges facing students who are experiencing homelessness. The data reveals that homelessness disproportionately impacts students of color.
African American, American Indian, and Latino students are 2 to 3 times more likely to be homeless. We estimate that between 2,600 and 4,400 of these students may be unaccompanied homeless youth who are not in the custody of a parent or guardian.

Homelessness has a significant impact on a student’s ability to learn. OSPI noted that homeless students have a graduation rate of 51.9%, compared to 78.1% in the general population. It is estimated that every time a student changes schools they lose 4-6 months of educational progress. Schools receive little support to address the needs of homeless students. Only 34 of Washington’s 300 school districts receive modest federal grants under the federal McKinney-Vento Act to help support homeless students, leaving many districts to tackle this crisis alone.

To continue reading, click here.

SUBMIT YOUR PAPER to the 15th Annual National Native American Law Students Association Writing Competition

cropped-cropped-nnalsa_logoThe NNALSA Writing Competition aims to recognize excellence in legal research/writing related to Indian law; encourage the development of writing skills among NNALSA members; and enhance substantive knowledge in Federal Indian Law, Tribal Law, and traditional forms of government.

Eligible Topics Include:

  • Federal Indian Law and Policy
  • Tribal Law and Policy
  • International Law and Policy Concerning Indigenous Peoples
  • Comparative Law (i.e. Inter-Tribal or Gov.-to-Gov. Studies)
  • Other Related Topics

Prizes:

  • First Prize: $1,000Publication in the Columbia Journal of Race and Law, sponsored by Sonosky
  • Second Prize: $500, sponsored by Dentons
  • Third Prize: $250, sponsored by Akin Gump

Awardees will be recognized at the National NALSA annual meeting (part of the 41st Annual Federal Bar Association Indian Law Conference on April 7–8, 2016).

Submit To: 2016NNALSAWritingCompetition@gmail.com.

  • Please remove identifying information such as name and school.
  • No need to supply any registration form or identification number.
  • All competitors must be current NNALSA members.
  • To become a member, visit www.nationalnalsa.org.

Deadline: 5:00 p.m. (EST), Monday, February 8, 2016.

For more information, visit goo.gl/RMvhuy or contact jmb2369@columbia.edu

UW Law Alum Nikkita Oliver on “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert”!

Here is a bit that Nikkita wrote explaining her involvement with “White Privilege II”:

24_oliver_wideIn the winter of 2014, after the non-indictment of Darren Wilson, Hollis Wong-Wear hit me up saying, “Macklemore (Ben) would like to meet with you (and other BLM activists/organizers) about the Black Lives Matter movement in Seattle.” My initial reaction was, “Why?” Like many black members of the hip-hop community I have a rather critical analysis of Macklemore and white supremacy in hip-hop—an art form and culture birthed out of the struggles and ingenuity of black people. Yet, I knew if I truly value the principle “each one teach one,” then I would sit down and have, in the least, a dialogue with Ben.

 Hollis, Ben and I talked for nearly three hours about BLM, Seattle, hip-hop, intersectionality, and ending white supremacy. It was clear to me from that conversation that Ben’s desire to be a part of the movement in an accountable manner was genuine.

 A month later Ben asked if he could spit some bars for me. Sitting in his Cadillac on Broadway I listened to the first iteration of the song. For nearly two hours we talked; thinking through different elements of the writing, the movement, and what it looks like to stand in accountable solidarity with BLM as a wealthy white cis-gender male with a wide music platform.

To continue reading, click here. Also, read her thoughts on the project in a piece written for The Stranger here.

UW Law Student Researches Industry Gender Inequity, Calls for Reforms by Peter Kelley, UW Today

Women routinely outperform men in university classrooms across the United States and are invited more often than men to join student honors societies — yet women continue to be paid far less than similarly qualified male colleagues. Photo of Harlan Mechling, a graduate student in the UW School of Law

Adding to that inequity, women also fare poorly when suing to recover damages for workplace sex and gender discrimination in the courts, with only 6 percent of such cases going to trial and then only one-third of even those cases being successful.

These are among the points underscored by Harlan Mechling, a graduate student in the UW School of Law and holder of this year’sHazelton Research Fellowship, in a research paper on gender inequity in the American workplace.

To continue reading, click here

Summer Funding Options, Opportunities for Service & Using Mindfulness to Mitigate Bias

How Will YOU  Fund your Public Service Internship this Summer?

piggybankBy Aline Carton-Listfjeld, Center for Public Service Law

At UW Law we are lucky to have a powerhouse student organization like PILA and a supportive administration which fundraises tons of money to help support summer public service internships. Unfortunately, there are always more deserving applicants than there is funding. So, are you going to put all of your eggs in your PILA basket or are you going to do some research and apply for many other funding sources that are out there? Hint: the latter.

Check out all the great summer funding resources on the Center for Public Service Law’s quick  reference guide (under summer funding towards the bottom of the page). These include labor and employment specific funding, LGBT rights funding, civil legal aid funding, human rights funding, international funding, and new for this year Latina/o advocacy  funding (just to name a few). Application deadlines tend to range between December through April with the bulk due in March/April giving you time to secure your summer internship. We highlight some of the most common sources of summer funding that UW Law students have applied for and obtained. But wait, there’s more! Also check out the great resources compiled by our friends at PSJD here and here. Investing a few hours in research and applications will pay huge dividends (literally). Don’t miss out!

If you missed our lunchtime presentation today don’t fret. Here are the slides to help you connect the dots.

New research finds implicit bias can be tamed through the use of time-honored meditation techniques.

trayvon-protestDecember 2, 2014 By Tom Jacobs, Pacific Standard- The Science of Society

A large crowd gathers to peacefully protest the Trayvon Martin murder case in Union Square in Manhattan on July 14, 2013. (Photo: Marie Havens/Shutterstock)

Racial bias has declined drastically in the United States over the past few decades. And yet, recent reaction to the tragic events in Ferguson, Missouri, suggests race continues to color our opinions, with both blacks and whites holding firm assumptions that their counterparts completely reject.

It’s something of a conundrum, until you consider implicit beliefs—the automatic thoughts and feelings that arise when one looks at an image of someone of another race. While these often operate below our level of consciousness, they shape our views of society and opinions on such policy issues as affirmative action, voter ID laws, and whether the justice system is genuinely just.

Fortunately, new research has documented a surprisingly simple way to short-circuit these knee-jerk negative associations. The key, according to Central Michigan University psychologists Adam Lueke and Bryan Gibson, is mindfulness.

Whites have “quicker response times for words that represent good things when paired with white faces than with black faces, and quicker response times for words that represent bad things when paired with black faces than white faces.” Continue reading here.

Attention Pro Bono Attorneys! Opportunity to Support Homeless Advocacy.

Homeless

SHARE is a homeless shelter in Seattle served by the Homeless Experience Legal Protection program. Presently, two matters are of huge concern to its community, as to which it is seeking pro bono legal representation. One concerns Nickelsville, an independent encampment of homeless people that is following all the legal obligations put upon it by the City of Seattle & etc. They are not receiving the same police services as other encampments, shelters and transitional housing projects and it is jeopardizing their safety and future. SHARE needs to figure out a way to get SPD to provide its residents the same support they provide others. The second issue concerns the complete defunding of SHARE – the county’s largest shelter provider – by King County Government. SHARE is also by far the most cost effective shelter outfit per bed night. SHARE would like to challenge the County’s defunding on numerous grounds – procedural, legal, common sense and political. This defunding isn’t something we can just let sit – the County Council is going to have to reconsider the whole thing sometime. If a lawyer in your firm is interested in either project, please have him/her contact Scott Morrow at Share Shelters shelters@sharewheel.org

Attention Lawyers & Community Members Committed to Social Justice! Washington State Access to Justice Board Seeks New Board Members. Application Due This Friday, January 9. Act Fast!

ATJ Board announcement

 

Will You Support Students Doing Human Rights Work? Consider Donating a Day’s Pay!

April 15: Social Justice Tuesday: Working with Homeless Youth in Seattle

SJT Logo

Tuesday, Apr. 15, 2014
12:30 – 1:20 PM, RM 133

Presented by: Street Youth Legal Advocates of Washington

The panel will discuss the challenges of working with homeless youth in the Seattle area. Their experiences include running programs for homeless youth, the mental health aspects of homelessness, and legislative advocacy. They will speak about the legal and non-legal issues facing homeless youth in Seattle, the organizations they work with, and how we as students can help.

Panelists:

  • Katelyn Stickel, Program Manager, Teen Feed
  • Jenny Donovan, counseling student
  • Kate Phillips, Program Director at Street Youth Ministries
  • Kimberly Schertz – 3L at UW Law

If you would like lunch please RSVP via Symplicity or Email by 12:00 pm Monday, April 14, 2014. No RSVP for lunch accepted after 12:00 pm.

April 16: Public Service Entrepreneurial Workshop

CPSL Logo

Wednesday, Apr. 16, 2014
3:30-5:20 PM, RM 133

Sponsored by the Center for Public Service Law

Interested in working for social justice?
Have an idea for starting up a social venture organization or business?
Want to create a different kind of law office providing legal services to underserved communities?

If you’ve answered yes to any of these questions, then this is the workshop for you!

Using a UW Law student’s project idea as a case study you’ll learn about the basics of business planning, corporate formation, funding through interactive exercises and lecture.

Presenters include:

  • Mary Whisner, Reference Librarian, Gallagher Law Library
  • Matt Souza, JD/MBA
  • Emily Nelson, 3L
  • Professor Jennifer Fan, Entrepreneurial Law Clinic

April 21: Come See Documented the Film at SIFF Cinema Uptown

Monday, Apr. 21, 2014 at 6:30 PM
SIFF Cinema Uptown, 511 Queen Anne Ave. N., Seattle
Tickets $12. Purchase Now

Please join us, along with our partners Define American, El Centro De La Raza and OneAmerica, on April 21 for a special one night only preview screening of DOCUMENTED, the new film by our friend Jose Antonio Vargas. Reserve your ticket today and help spread the word!

In 2011, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas outed himself as an undocumented immigrant in an essay published in the New York Times Magazine. DOCUMENTED chronicles his journey to America from the Philippines as a child; his journey through America as an immigration reform activist; and his journey inward as he re-connects with his mother, whom he hasn’t seen in person in over 20 years.

April 21: Cambodian Son Screening

Monday, Apr. 21, 2014
Gates Hall, RM 138
Doors open at 7:30 PM, Screening starts at 8:00 PM

“Cambodian Son” is a film chronicling the life of spoken word poet Kosal Khiev, who was born in a Thai refugee camp, came to U.S. as a child, was arrested at 16 for gang violence. He spent over a decade in California prisons before being deported to Cambodia and barred from re-entering the US. The documentary touches on the intersection of multiple social justice issues including refugee rights, immigration, juvenile justice, and the redemptive power of the arts. Director Masahiro Sugano will be speaking about Cambodian Son in a pre-screening lecture at lunch on (room 127).

If you are interested in coming, please sign up on here ASAP (ideally by Friday, April 11th, but we will accept persons who sign up later): https://docs.google.com/. The event will be made open to the public as the first screening in Seattle has already SOLD OUT. However, we will reserve a certain number of seats for law students and persons associated with the law school based on the interest you all show in coming! There are no tickets, but we ask that you consider making a donation at the door. All proceeds go to support Kosal Khiev’s art. Any questions, please email.

April 29: Reversing the Effects of Mass Incarceration: Implementing Criminal Justice Reforms

hands behind bars

Photo courtesy of PhotoVault & Val Lawless.

Tuesday, Apr. 29, 2014
6:00 – 7:30 PM
William H. Gates Hall, RM 138, RSVP Required

The incarceration rate in the United States is the highest in the world, which has led some to call our current criminal justice structure a system of mass incarceration. This system—which contains over 2 million people in American prisons and jails—has decimated communities, especially those of color, created two tiers of justice, one for the rich and the other for the poor, and, in some instances, has resulted in government spending more money on incarceration than education.

The University of Washington School of Law and the Gates Public Service Law Program invites you to a forum on how we as a community can reverse the effects of mass incarceration through implementing criminal justice reforms. The forum will cover sentencing reform, prison rehabilitation programs, and prison reentry.

The program will start promptly at 6pm.

Presenters:

Alexes Harris, Assistant Professor, University of Washington Department of Sociology: Addressing the Juvenile Justice Pipeline to Mass Incarceration

Michael Romano, Director and co-founder of the Three Strikes Project, Stanford Law School: Righting the Wrongs of “Three Strikes” Life Sentences

Michael Santos, prison reform activist, lecturer at San Francisco State University: Prisoner Re-entry: Triumphing over Imprisonment  

Panel Discussion:

Moderator:
The Honorable Steven C. González, Washington State Supreme Court

Ari Kohn, Director: Post-Prison Education Program

Jacqueline McMurtrie, Associate Professor & Director: Innocence Project Northwest, UW School of Law

Connie Smith, Chief US Probation and Pretrial Services Officer, Western District of Washington

To attend the event, register online here.

May 3: Center for Human Rights & Justice Annual Fundraiser: Donate a Day’s Pay

CHRJ Logo

Do you have a paying summer job?  Do you care about human rights?  Like hobnobbing with professors?

Help CHRJ fund a grant for a UW law student to do human rights work this summer by “donating a day’s pay” to CHRJ’s grant fund.

The first 40 students to donate or pledge $100 or more are invited to a party at Professor Bob Anderson’s home.  Enjoy food, drinks, and conversation with your professors and classmates!

Donate during lunch at the CHRJ ‘Donate a Day’s Pay’ Table today!  Party to be held on May 3, 2014.

Click here for more information.

Donate online here.

Exciting News in Fair Housing, Human Rights, and Innovative Social Enterprise Fellowship

Tent Cities, Homelessness & Human Rights Webinar TOMORROW

housing

Thursday, Mar. 6, 2014
11 AM PST / 2 PM EST

In March, the National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty will release to the public its long-awaited report, “Welcome Home: The Rise of Tent Cities in the United States,” addressing the human and civil rights implications of the growth of homeless encampments across the country. The report, co-authored with the Yale Law School Allard K. Lowenstein Human Rights Clinic, comes as the U.S. prepares for four reviews by international human rights monitors in the coming year, and follows new steps by the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness to address homelessness as a human rights issue. It also comes on the heels of the Law Center’s annual “Human Right to Housing Report Card.

Come and learn about the human and civil rights issues faced by homeless persons, the response from the federal government, as well as the process of review by the U.N. human rights monitors and how you can make human rights real in your community.

Register for the webinar tomorrow here.

Lessons Worth Sharing: Check out this video on “Rethinking Thinking” by Trevor Maber

Save the Date!  28th Annual Western Washington Fair Housing Conference on May 22, Registration Opens in March

City of Tacoma Logo

The conference will highlight how to take the lead, at all levels from community member to housing provider to government official, in promoting and ensuring fair housing for all.

The fair housing conference will provide interactive learning opportunities.  Plenary sessions are planned to share information about leadership and how to use it to achieve fair housing.  Workshops will cover topics including fair housing law overview, disabilities and reasonable accommodations, communicating with residents, how government officials can implement practices to promote fair housing, and much more!

Registration opens in March 2014.  For more information, click here.

Marking the 20th Anniversary of the Executive Order on Environmental Justice: Retrospective Report Issued

Plant Seedling_ Courtesy of Markuso & Free Digital Photos

This report is a compilation of several previous reports. In preparation for the four-day Second National People of Color Environmental Leadership Summit, held in Washington, DC in October 2002, the Environmental Justice Resource Center (EJRC) compiled the Environmental Justice Timeline/Milestones – 1964-2002 report, one of the first comprehensive documents to chronicle accomplishments of the Environmental Justice Movement. The milestones were later updated in the 2007 United Church of Christ Toxic Wastes and Race at Twenty – 1987-2007 report and in 2010 in Environmental Health and Racial Equity in the United States: Strategies for Building Environmentally Just, Sustainable, and Liveable Communities (American Public Health Association 2011).

February 11, 2014 marked the 20th anniversary of the historic Environmental Justice Executive Order 12898 “Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations” signed by President Clinton. This retrospective report was prepared by Robert Bullard et al. and released as part of the 20-year commemoration.

To read full the report, click herePhoto of Plant Seedling Courtesy of Markuso and Free Digital Photos.

Mayors Sign On to Support International Human Rights, The US Coalition of Cities Against Racism and Discrimination

USCM Logo

Working with UNESCO and the U.S. Department of State, the U.S. Conference of Mayors has established the U.S. Coalition of Cities Against Racism and Discrimination.  Over 100 mayors have signed on to the initiative (not yet including New York City).

Click here to see a list of mayors who have signed on.
Click here to read more about the coalition’s 10-Point Plan of Action.

Civil Legal Corps Announces Innovative Social Enterprise Fellowship

CLC Equal Justice Under the Law

Civic Legal Corps (CLC) is an innovative legal social enterprise fellowship and training program that empowers young attorneys to restore justice and expand access to legal services for low- and moderate-income people. CLC supports young attorneys committed to bridging the justice gap, building healthy and sustaining communities, and improving the quality of life for everyone.

Our creed is simple: young attorneys should be able to make a living fighting for justice, and justice should be accessible for all Americans – regardless of their ability to afford it.

Continue reading here. (Photo courtesy of CLC.)

Reminder: QLaw Foundation Offers Summer Grant Program Up to $5,000, Due 3/14

QLaw Foundation Logo

Are you a member of the LGBTQ community or an ally?  Do you plan on spending your summer internship promoting the rights of LGBT persons or persons living with HIV/AIDS?  Will you be working with a non-profit organization or government agency?

If so, you may be eligible for up to a $5000 grant to fund 10 full-time, 40 hour weeks of work. The goal of the QLaw Foundation grant program is to ensure that unmet legal needs in the LGBT community are recognized and prioritized, and that the next generation of legal advocates for LGBT rights develop the skills necessary for careers in public interest law.

Applications due by March 14, 2014.

For more information and application details, please click here.

Check Out These Fellowships, Immigration Work, and Other Housing-Related Positions

Attention 3Ls and Recent Grads! Nome Superior Court in Alaska Court System Seeking Law Clerk I, Due TODAY

Alaska Courts System Judiciary

The Alaska Court System is accepting applications for a Law Clerk to serve a Superior Court Judge in Nome, Alaska. The position will be available August or September 2014 and last one year. The successful applicant will perform research relating to motions before the court; summarize case files; and prepare memoranda and recommendations. The position may also organize files, review case files for procedural sufficiency, review orders and judgments prepared for signature, and assist in the preparation of jury instructions and other duties. After training, the law clerk will act as the Deputy Magistrate during arraignment hearings one weekend per month.

Benefits: The ACS provides health insurance for the employee and eligible dependents, 11 paid holidays, personal leave accrual, Supplemental Benefits System (SBS), and the opportunity to participate in the Deferred Compensation Plan. Travel and moving expenses may be eligible for reimbursement according to the policies of the ACS.

For more information and application details, click here.  Click on “Information for Prospective Law Clerks” for complete details.

U.S. Department of Homeland Security Seeking Summer Intern in Immigration Section in Washington D.C., Due 3/9

DHS Logo

The purpose of this internship for Summer 2014 is to assist the Immigration Section in the DHS Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties (CRCL). CRCL’s Immigration Section works to ensure that civil rights and civil liberties protections are incorporated into the Department’s immigration-related policies, programs, and activities and supports the CRCL Officer in her role as the designated Department point of contact for international human rights treaty reporting and coordination under Executive Order 13107.

This internship is located in the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties (CRCL) in Washington, D.C.  The Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties (CRCL) supports the Department’s mission to secure the nation while preserving individual liberty, fairness, and equality under the law.

For complete information and application details, click here.

Attention Class of 2016!  Goodwin Public Interest Fellowship for Law Students of Color, Due 3/14

Goodwin Fellowship Image

For the past eight years, Goodwin has invested in a diverse legal community by offering fellowships to high-achieving law students of color.  Our fellowship program offers awards of $7,500 to students of color who work in public interest positions the summer after their first year of law school.  This program allows us to connect with a wide array of talented students early in their legal careers who are committed to giving back to their communities.

In addition to the monetary fellowship award, selected fellows are guaranteed a “straight-to-callback” interview with the Goodwin Procter office of their choice in the fall interviewing season during their second year of law school.  Fellows will also be invited to participate in some of our summer associate program events during their summer at the public interest organization.

Click here for additional information on the Fellowships and application details.

Attention Recent and Post Grads!  U.S. Department of State – Bureau of Population, Refugees & Migration Seeking Full Time Attorney, Due 3/14

UNHCR Refugees

The incumbent will work under the direct supervision and guidance of the Senior Protection Officer and the overall supervision of the Representative. After undergoing necessary briefing on the job, the incumbent and the supervisor will agree on a number of objectives to be met as well as core, functional and managerial competencies s/he should demonstrate during the assignment. The supervisor will provide the necessary coaching required by the incumbent throughout the assignment.

Please note that PRM-sponsored JPO positions are open to U.S. Citizens only.  Application deadline is March 14, 2014.  Photo courtesy of UNHCR.

For more details and application information, click here.

Attention Post-Grads! Victim Rights Law Center Seeking Two Full Time Staff Attorneys in Oregon, Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis

Transitional Housing and TA Staff Attorney Position

The Victim Rights Law Center (VRLC), a nonprofit law center that provides free legal services to victims of sexual assault in Oregon and in Massachusetts, as well as legal technical assistance nationally, seeks a full-time, Oregon-licensed attorney to join our team and coordinate the VRLC’s transitional housing partnership. The attorney will provide training as well as legal assistance to sexual violence survivors who are homeless, with a special focus on survivors who are older, Latina or have disabilities. Services to be provided include legal screening and limited legal representation, sexual assault and legal trainings (for both homeless advocates as well as survivors experiencing homelessness) on how to use existing civil laws to meet sexual assault survivors’ needs. The attorney will also help the VRLC’s technical assistance team support lawyers, advocates and other victim service providers in their efforts to use existing civil laws to meet the needs of sexual assault survivors. This position is grant funded. Applicants should have a minimum of three (3) years legal experience, including some litigation practice, as well as experience working with sexual assault survivors and with vulnerable populations. Spanish language fluency is preferred, but not required.

Privacy Project Staff Attorney Position

The Victim Rights Law Center (VRLC) seeks a full-time attorney, with excellent writing, product development and organizational and communication skills, as well as a strong work ethic, a good sense of humor, and a commitment to serving vulnerable populations. Based in our Portland, Oregon, office, the successful candidate will help implement VRLC’s new Privacy Rights Project by conducting legal research, developing resources, creating curriculum, and delivering state and national trainings on the privacy rights of victims of sexual assault, stalking and domestic violence. Applicants should have a minimum of three (3) years legal experience, expertise serving sexual assault survivors and/or addressing victims’ privacy rights, and experience creating and delivering engaging, effective, in-person and web-based trainings.

For application information, click here.

Attention 1Ls and 2Ls! Andrade Legal Seeking Summer Law Clerk To Assist With Its Immigration Docket in Idaho, Due 4/1

Andrade Legal Team

Andrade legal seeks law student for a summer internship to assist with its immigration docket.  Student will join team of lawyers and staff handling the firms removal defense, family immigration and detention docket.  Law student will also assist firm prepare educational materials to be used in trainings with criminal defense attorneys, courts and the community at large.  Tasks may include drafting legal memorandum, legal research, gathering and summarizing evidence in support of hardship waivers and visa applications and assisting attorneys launch a program to educate incarcerated individuals about deportation proceedings.

For more information and application details, click here.

Attention Recent Grads! Zalkind Duncan & Bernstein LLP Seeking Full Time Attorney in Boston

ZDB LLP Logo

ZALKIND DUNCAN & BERNSTEIN LLP, a premier Boston criminal defense and civil litigation firm, seeks an associate to start in fall 2014.  This progressive 10-lawyer law firm has an exceptionally interesting and dynamic federal and state court practice, at both the trial and appellate levels.  Recent criminal cases include first degree murder, white collar, federal drug, sex offender registry and street crime cases.  Our civil practice consists of employment discrimination, civil rights, academic discipline, First Amendment litigation, GLBT legal issues, complex domestic relations, and serious personal injury litigation. Excellent benefits.  More information about our firm can be found on our website: http://www.zalkindlaw.com.

For more information on the position and application details, click here.

Interested in Practicing in California? The Eviction Defense Collaborative Seeks Entry-Level Staff Attorney in their San Francisco Office

Golden Gate Bridge_Courtesy of Arvind Balarama & Free Digital Photos

The Eviction Defense Collaborative seeks an enthusiastic individual to join our team in fighting for tenant rights and saving homes. As a staff attorney you will work with a team of attorneys, interns and volunteers in assisting primarily in pro. per. tenants fight their eviction lawsuits.

The Eviction Defense Collaborative (EDC) provides legal assistance and advocacy to low-income and indigent tenants in San Francisco who are being evicted. We assist by educating tenants about the legal process, advising them of their options, drafting responsive legal documents, providing referrals to assist them in fighting their evictions and negotiating legal settlements. The EDC also administers one-time rental assistance grants and loans to help tenants who are behind in their rent to pay the rent and stay in their homes. The work at the EDC is made possible by a small staff and many volunteers from local schools and the community. The work environment at the EDC is collegial, rather than having a rigid hierarchy of job positions, and we work as a team to assist the tenants who seek our help.

For more information and application details, click here.

Photo of Golden Gate Bridge courtesy of Arvind Balarama & Free Digital Photos.

U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs Seeking Summer Intern in Washington D.C., Applications Accepted on Rolling Basis

VA Seal

Professional Staff Group (PSG) VII, the Office of the General Counsel’s Appellate Litigation Division, represents the Secretary before the United States Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims (CAVC). It is the newest and largest group in OGC. With more than 120 persons, the staff includes approximately 70 appellate attorneys and a support staff of paralegals, legal assistants, and copy clerks. A 14-member management team completes the PSG VII staff.

Interns will initially be provided instruction in veterans law, as well as the VA adjudication system. The student will then be assigned a limited case load and will perform research and writing tasks associated with the needs of individual cases depending on their procedural posture. It is expected that at the completion of the
externship, the student will have prepared a pre-Briefing Conference memo, participated in a Briefing Conference, drafted procedural motions, and drafted and filed an Appellate brief with the United States Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims (CAVC). Additionally, the student will be expected to attend and participate in moot
courts in preparation for oral argument before the CAVC.

For more information and application details, click here.