Loans got you down? Scholarships applications for UW Alumni Association due May 12

Due May 12: Funding available through UW Alumni Association

Application Deadline: Friday, May 12, 2017

The University of Washington Alumni Association (UWAA) Multicultural Alumni Partnership (MAP) awards scholarships to deserving University of Washington students who need financial assistance to assist with their progress toward a degree at the UW. Funding for these scholarships comes from contribution from UW alumni and friends as well as proceeds from the Bridging the Gap Breakfast held annually on Homecoming Saturday.

Apply and learn more here.

Due May 14: Apply to be on the EJW National Advisory Committee

EJW LogoApplication Deadline: Sunday, May 14, 2017

The Equal Justice Works National Advisory Committee (NAC) provides leadership, advice and outreach assistance to support Equal Justice Works in mobilizing the next generation of public interest attorneys. The NAC convenes a diverse group of law students and law school professionals to act as Equal Justice Works ambassadors within the law school and legal services communities and assist with the implementation of initiatives.

Apply and learn more here.

Not sure how to deal with that one family member at the reunion? SPLC has a guide for responding to everyday bigotry

During a time of great change, civil legal aid may be threatened

screenshot-37Originally published as “Prepare To Dig In To Preserve Civil Legal Aid” by Lonnie A. Powers, executive director of the Massachusetts Legal Assistance Corporation, on the Huffington Post. Image courtesy of the Huffington Post.

“We don’t quite know what to expect from the federal government in the weeks and months ahead in terms of support for civil legal aid. For decades, support for the Legal Services Corporation (LSC), the nonprofit that administers federal funding to legal aid programs across the country, has been seen as a smart investment by members of both parties.” Read the full article here.

SPLC: “Speak Up: Responding to Everyday Bigotry”

SPLC LogoOriginally published by the Southern Poverty Law Center. This guide provides ideas and actions for responding to bigotry and ignorance in everyday life.

“Your brother routinely makes anti-Semitic comments. Your neighbor uses the N-word in casual conversation. Your co-worker ribs you about your Italian surname, asking if you’re in the mafia. Your classmate insults something by saying, “That’s so gay.”

And you stand there, in silence, thinking, “What can I say in response to that?” Or you laugh along, uncomfortably. Or, frustrated or angry, you walk away without saying anything, thinking later, “I should have said something.” Learn how to deal with these types of situations with the Speak Up guide. Read the full guide here.

Shriver Center creates “Racial Justice Training Institute”

Shriver CenterIn the face of a coming transition in federal leadership and deep societal divisions, anti-poverty advocates must understand and address issues of race, implicit bias, and how to affirmatively advance racial equity. The Racial Justice Training Institute is a groundbreaking national leadership program that offers a transformative experience to build and fortify agents for change.

Working in teams, and with support from skilled faculty and coaches, you’ll learn how to use new racial justice knowledge and skills in your daily work and apply these to a racial equity initiative that your team will work on throughout the Institute. Learn more and apply to the institute here.

New Summer Funding, Writing Competition, Attend Citizen University & Board Service News- Just for You!

UW Law & Latina/o Bar Association Announce New Public Interest Summer Grant, Deadline 4/3

UW LBAW Summer Grant

The Latina/o Bar Association of Washington and the University of Washington School of Law Public Interest Summer Grant provides $5000 for one UW Law Latina/o student to intern with a public interest organization and/or any UW law student with a summer internship working with an organization providing access to justice/equal justice to Latina/o communities. This summer grant is a jointly funded initiative by the Latina/o Bar Association of Washington and (LBAW) and the University of Washington School of Law (UW Law).

The purpose of this grant is to support Latina/o UW Law students in pursuit of public interest careers and other UW law students committed to increasing access to justice to Latina/o communities.

Students must first secure an offer of an unpaid summer internship with a public interest employer before applying. For complete information and application instructions please click here.

Funding for UW Law Students is Available for: Citizen University National Conference, Funding Deadline: 1/22!

Citizen University (3.21 conference) Image_Guiding Lights Network

Let’s rekindle citizenship in America! March 20 & 21, 2015

Friday, March 20 at 6:30pm at Fisher Pavilion – Seattle Center

This annual national conference is like no other civic gathering in America. Hundreds of change-makers, activists, and catalysts show up to learn about power, build their networks, and recharge their sense of purpose. They come from across the country, the political spectrum, and a wide range of domains — from immigrant rights to national service, voting reform to veteran re-integration, civic education to Hollywood and tech. They are you.

This is a time when citizens are solving problems in new ways, bypassing broken institutions, stale ideologies, and polarized politics. We are part of a movement to rekindle citizenship in America. We hope you’ll join us

Bring a water bottle, wear comfortable clothing and shoes, and learn how to practice powerful citizenship! http://www.citizenuniversity.us/conference/

If you wish to attend send your request and resume to mestorms@uw.edu by January 22, 11:59 pm.

William L. Dwyer Jury Project Award Writing Competition, Deadline 4/20

William Dwywer

UW Law and the Federal Bar Association of the Western District of Washington are again sponsoring the William L. Dwyer Jury Project Award writing competition. Only UW Law Students (2L/3L/LLM) can enter. 

Judge Dwyer was a respected and beloved Seattle federal district judge who was passionate about protecting the role of juries in our legal system. He cared about this subject so much that wrote an incredible book during his last years of life, called “In the Hands of the People: The Trial Jury’s Origins, Triumphs, Troubles, and Future in American Democracy.” After his death in 2002, his former clerks and the attorneys who appeared before him created this writing competition to honor his legacy. 

To enter, write a paper on the American jury system (including the grand jury system! Papers about Ferguson, New York, and other recent events are welcome). Polish and submit a paper you are already writing for a class, or write a paper specifically for the competition. The paper can be a traditional law-review style scholarly article, an essay or magazine-style article, an empirical analysis (e.g., of jury composition or awards in one or more jurisdictions or types of cases), etc. You can view past winning papers here: http://www.law.washington.edu/Writing/competitions.aspx 

First prize this year is $2,500. A second prize of $500 may also be awarded. The winning paper may also be published in the Federal Bar News. 

Washington State Bar Foundation Seeks Law Student Trustee for Board of Trustees

WSBF

The Washington State Bar Association Board of Governors is currently seeking a law student to fill the position of Student Trustee on the Washington State Bar Foundation Board of Trustees.  The Bar Foundation is the fundraising arm of the WSBA.  Its mission is to provide financial support for WSBA programs that promote diversity within the legal profession and that enhance the public’s access to, and understanding of, the justice system. Bar Foundation funding helps to power vital programs like the WSBA Moderate Means Program, WSBA Call to Duty, and more. 

Candidates must have completed at least one academic year at one of Washington’s law schools.  The ideal candidate will be passionate about diversity and public service within the legal profession, and will have experience with nonprofit leadership and fundraising. 

This Student Trustee’s term will begin upon appointment, will last for the duration of the student’s time in law school, and may be renewed upon graduation. Trustees are stewards of the Bar Foundation, a nonprofit public charity, and are actively involved in all aspects of donor development.  The Student Trustee helps connect students from all three Washington law schools with the Bar Foundation and the WSBA programs it supports. 

To learn more about duties and time commitments, please contact Megan McNally, Director of Advancement, at meganm@wsba.org, or (206) 727-8272. To be considered, please submit a cover letter and résumé by email to foundation@wsba.org.

Newsflash! Millennials are More Likely to Volunteer!

December 29, 2014, The Associated Press

Photo courtesy: Flickr/Alex Pearson
Employees from Yahoo! at a volunteer day in 2011.

WASHINGTON — Tired of hearing people grouse about a tuned-out, apathetic younger generation?

Well, here’s a comeback: Today’s young Americans are more serious about giving back than their parents were.

In fact, those under age 30 now are more likely to say citizens have a “very important obligation” to volunteer, an Associated Press-GfK poll finds.

The embrace of volunteering is striking because young people’s commitment to other civic duties — such as voting, serving on a jury and staying informed — has dropped sharply from their parents’ generation and is lower than that of Americans overall.

Among six civic activities in the AP-GfK poll, volunteering is the only one that adults under 30 rated as highly as older people did.

“I want to make my city where I live a better place,” Morgan Gress, 24, of Washington said after sorting and hanging donated clothes with co-workers who chose to volunteer in lieu of an office holiday party. After you volunteer, she said, “You never walk away feeling you didn’t have a great time, or help someone out, or learn something new.”

Today’s young adults grew up amid nudges from a volunteering infrastructure that has grown exponentially since their parents’ day, when the message typically came through churches or scouting. Continue reading here.

 

 

 

Summer Funding Options, Opportunities for Service & Using Mindfulness to Mitigate Bias

How Will YOU  Fund your Public Service Internship this Summer?

piggybankBy Aline Carton-Listfjeld, Center for Public Service Law

At UW Law we are lucky to have a powerhouse student organization like PILA and a supportive administration which fundraises tons of money to help support summer public service internships. Unfortunately, there are always more deserving applicants than there is funding. So, are you going to put all of your eggs in your PILA basket or are you going to do some research and apply for many other funding sources that are out there? Hint: the latter.

Check out all the great summer funding resources on the Center for Public Service Law’s quick  reference guide (under summer funding towards the bottom of the page). These include labor and employment specific funding, LGBT rights funding, civil legal aid funding, human rights funding, international funding, and new for this year Latina/o advocacy  funding (just to name a few). Application deadlines tend to range between December through April with the bulk due in March/April giving you time to secure your summer internship. We highlight some of the most common sources of summer funding that UW Law students have applied for and obtained. But wait, there’s more! Also check out the great resources compiled by our friends at PSJD here and here. Investing a few hours in research and applications will pay huge dividends (literally). Don’t miss out!

If you missed our lunchtime presentation today don’t fret. Here are the slides to help you connect the dots.

New research finds implicit bias can be tamed through the use of time-honored meditation techniques.

trayvon-protestDecember 2, 2014 By Tom Jacobs, Pacific Standard- The Science of Society

A large crowd gathers to peacefully protest the Trayvon Martin murder case in Union Square in Manhattan on July 14, 2013. (Photo: Marie Havens/Shutterstock)

Racial bias has declined drastically in the United States over the past few decades. And yet, recent reaction to the tragic events in Ferguson, Missouri, suggests race continues to color our opinions, with both blacks and whites holding firm assumptions that their counterparts completely reject.

It’s something of a conundrum, until you consider implicit beliefs—the automatic thoughts and feelings that arise when one looks at an image of someone of another race. While these often operate below our level of consciousness, they shape our views of society and opinions on such policy issues as affirmative action, voter ID laws, and whether the justice system is genuinely just.

Fortunately, new research has documented a surprisingly simple way to short-circuit these knee-jerk negative associations. The key, according to Central Michigan University psychologists Adam Lueke and Bryan Gibson, is mindfulness.

Whites have “quicker response times for words that represent good things when paired with white faces than with black faces, and quicker response times for words that represent bad things when paired with black faces than white faces.” Continue reading here.

Attention Pro Bono Attorneys! Opportunity to Support Homeless Advocacy.

Homeless

SHARE is a homeless shelter in Seattle served by the Homeless Experience Legal Protection program. Presently, two matters are of huge concern to its community, as to which it is seeking pro bono legal representation. One concerns Nickelsville, an independent encampment of homeless people that is following all the legal obligations put upon it by the City of Seattle & etc. They are not receiving the same police services as other encampments, shelters and transitional housing projects and it is jeopardizing their safety and future. SHARE needs to figure out a way to get SPD to provide its residents the same support they provide others. The second issue concerns the complete defunding of SHARE – the county’s largest shelter provider – by King County Government. SHARE is also by far the most cost effective shelter outfit per bed night. SHARE would like to challenge the County’s defunding on numerous grounds – procedural, legal, common sense and political. This defunding isn’t something we can just let sit – the County Council is going to have to reconsider the whole thing sometime. If a lawyer in your firm is interested in either project, please have him/her contact Scott Morrow at Share Shelters shelters@sharewheel.org

Attention Lawyers & Community Members Committed to Social Justice! Washington State Access to Justice Board Seeks New Board Members. Application Due This Friday, January 9. Act Fast!

ATJ Board announcement

 

Welcome to 2015 Events!

Tuesday, January 6, 12:00-1:30, Downtown- Police Militarization & Police Misconduct

normstamper

The WSAJ Civil Rights Section Brown Bag Meeting presents…

Police Militarization & Police Misconduct, Keynote Speaker Norm Stamper, Former Seattle Police Chief (1994-2000)

Norman Stamper began his career as a beat cop in San Diego in 1966. Norman is a long-time advocate for police reform, and the author of “Breaking Rank – A Top Cop’s Exposé of the Dark Side of American Policing.”

Plaza 600 Conference Room, 600 Stewart St. Room 205. RSVP: Jeanne@washingtonjustice.org

Wednesday, January 7, 12:30-1:20, Room 127- Career Building Wednesdays- Public Service Summer Funding

2015 PS Summer Funding Flyer

Wednesday, January 14, 3:30-5:30pm, Room 138- Race, Immigration & Citizenship

Race Immigration and Citizenship, January 14

 

 

Want To Share About Your Summer Experience? Submit Photos to the Summer Experience Photo Contest!

UW Career Center Invites You to Participate in Its Student Photo Contest

UW Summer Experience Photo Contest

We are excited to announce our first-ever student photo contest!  We are encouraging any UW student to take a picture of their “Summer Experience,” which can pertain to their internship, part-time job, travel, volunteer, job shadow, etc.  Students will then post their pictures via their personal Twitter or Instagram accounts, write a short caption describing the context of the picture, and include the hashtag #UWCCPhoto.   The contest runs from August 22nd-September 24th.  Prizes will be awarded!

For full details of the contest and how students submit photos, click here.  We are also tracking photo submissions here.   

2014 King County Support for Solo and Small Firm Attorneys Grants Sponsored by Washington Women Lawyers, King County Chapter

WWL

The King County Chapter of Washington Women Lawyers (KCWWL) is pleased to provide a grant opportunity of up to $1,500 each to two or more awardees to complement our traditional academic scholarships for University of Washington and Seattle University Law School students in 2014.  The Support for Solo and Small Firm Attorneys program is intended to recognize excellence in practice for new solo or small firm (2-3 attorneys) practitioners whose work benefits women directly or improves women’s access to justice in Seattle/King County.

KCWWL has recognized many factors impacting new attorneys as they attempt to enter the work force in the Seattle/King County area, and is continuing its efforts at retaining diversity in the field of law.  This grant is focused on: 1) reducing the numbers of women attorneys leaving the profession; and 2) lessening the impact of the recession on recent bar certified attorneys graduating with record levels of law school debt.

For more information, click here.

New Disability Rights Guide Released by the Washington Leadership Institute on Washington Law Help

Washington Leadership Institute Logo

Knowing your rights as a person with a disability is an important part of being an effective self-advocate and making decisions about your own life. This guide is designed to provide young people with disabilities information and resources so that you can understand and exercise your legal rights.

Check out the new guide online here.

Equal Justice Works, Skadden, Echoing Green, AmeriCorps… Oh My! Navigating Public Interest Fellowships

March 31: Global Mondays: Truth, Justice and Reparation in Northern Ireland

Northern Ireland Flag

Monday, Mar. 31, 2014
12:30-1:20 PM, Gates Hall RM 117 (unless noted)

Hosted by UW Law Graduate Program in Sustainable International Development and the PhD Program, and the Comparative Law & Society Studies (CLASS) Center

“Dealing with the Past: Narrating Truth in Northern Ireland”

Dr. Kathleen Cavanaugh, Irish Center for Human Rights, National University of Ireland

In truth telling processes in transitional societies, such as Northern Ireland, mechanisms established to find the truth, such as truth commissions, endeavour to find a common narrative emerging about the causes of conflict. At the same time, there is now evidence that such processes also create silences; some narratives are not fully represented. This lecture will provide some background on the conflict in Northern Ireland and how such a meta-conflict situation has given rise to conflicts over memories of state.

Image courtesy of Stockvault and Nicolas Raymond.

April 1: Social Justice Tuesday: Public Interest Post Graduate Fellowships

SJT Logo

Tuesday, Apr. 1, 2014
12:30-1:20 PM, RM 133

Speaker: Aline Carton-Listfjeld, Center for Public Service Law

Equal Justice Works, Skadden, Echoing Green, AmeriCorps…Oh my!

Trying to make sense of the all the fellowships out there? Get vital resources and learn about the different types of fellowships for recent law grads with experience and passion for social justice and public interest law. 1Ls and 2Ls are strongly encouraged to attend.

If you would like lunch please RSVP via Symplicity or Email by 12:00 pm Monday, March 31.

April 2-3: Clinics Information Fair

2014 Clinic Info Week Schedule

April 7: Global Mondays, LGBT Rights Internationally: Russia, India, Uganda, Nigeria and Beyond

Monday, Apr. 7, 2014
12:30 – 1:20 PM, RM 127
Speakers from the International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission:

Jessica Stern

Jessica Stern is the Executive Director of the International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission. As the first researcher on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) human rights at Human Rights Watch, she conducted fact-finding investigations and advocacy around sexual orientation and gender identity in countries including Iran, Kyrgyzstan, South Africa, and the United Arab Emirates. She holds a masters degree in human rights from the London School of Economics. She is frequently quoted in the Mail & Guardian, Al Jazeera English, the Associated Press, Reuters, Agence France Presse, Deutsche Welle, Voice of America, The Guardian and The BBC.

Grace Poore

Grace Poore, from Malaysia, has been the Regional Program Coordinator for Asia and the Pacific Islands at the International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission (IGLHRC) since 2007.  She develops the work in Asia, oversees multi-country projects on human rights documentation and advocacy in Asia, and conducts trainings.  She co-wrote the video “Courage Unfolds” about LGBT activism in Asia and the Yogyakarta Principles.  Ms. Poore holds a Masters degree from Syracuse University, Newhouse School of Communications.  She is currently working on a report about violence against lesbians, bisexual women, and transgender people in five Asian countries.

May 5: Gates Public Service Law Speaker Series: Professor Thomas Buergenthal Speaking on “Becoming an International Judge via the Holocaust”

Thomas Buergenthal

Monday, May 5, 2014
4:30 – 5:30 PM, RM 133
Reception to follow at the Burke Museum

Thomas Buergenthal is the Lobingier Professor of Comparative Law and Jurisprudence at George Washington University. He came to the United States at the age of 17. He spent the first 11 years of his life in various German camps and is one of the youngest survivors of the Auschwitz and Sachsenhausen concentration camps. Considered one of the world’s leading international human rights experts, Professor Buergenthal was a Judge and President of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights as well as President of the Administrative Tribunal of the Inter-American Development. He was a member of the UN Human Rights Committee and UN Truth Commission for El Salvador. He is a member of the Ethics  Commission of the International Olympic Committee and the honorary president of the Inter-American Institute of Human Rights in San José.

Co-Sponsors: The Jackson School, the UW Center for Human Rights, Hillel, and the  Jewish Studies Department. 

Reception Sponsored by the Gates Public Service Law Program and the UW Center for Human Rights. (Sponsorship of this event by the University of Washington School of Law and the W.H. Gates Public Service law Program does not imply endorsement.)

RSVP via Symplicity or email.