Want to Learn More About Police-Civilian Conflict or the ACA? Check Out These Free Online Events!

August 19: Can We Break the Cycle of Police-Civilian Conflict? (Online Event)

Jamie and Megan Price

Date: Wednesday, Aug. 19, 2015
Time: 1:00 PM – 1:30 PM EST / 12:00 PM – 12:30 PM CT
Location: Google+ Hangout Air

The events of the past year in Baltimore and Ferguson have shown the rest of the country the fragile state of police-civilian relations in many low-income communities of color. Many advocates are eager for real solutions to break these patterns of conflict.

Join us in a Google+ Hangout on Air as we talk to Jamie Price of the Sargent Shriver Peace Institute and Megan Price of the School of Conflict Analysis and Resolution at George Mason University about how “insight policing” has worked in Memphis, Tennessee, and Lowell, Massachusetts. Be sure to check out their Clearinghouse Article, Insight Policing and the Role of the Civilian in Police Accountability, on the Clearinghouse Community.

Register online here.

August 27: Webinar on The Affordable Care Act and Its Impact on Family Law

woman, child, man (c) Shriver Center

Date: Thursday, Aug. 27, 2015
Time: 2:00 PM – 3:30 PM EST / 1:00 PM – 2:30 PM CT
Location: Online Free Webinar

How does the Affordable Care Act (ACA) affect health care eligibility, coverage, and enrollment of parties and their dependents in family law cases? How do changes in household composition or mixed immigration status alter ACA coverage?

This webinar will educate family law, health care, and legal aid practitioners about the impact of the ACA on the practice of family law. Model decrees and settlement agreements that provide for health care coverage for the parties and dependents will be covered. The presenters will also discuss how to educate the court and judiciary about the issues involved in providing health care coverage through the ACA in dissolution cases.

Register online here.  Photo courtesy of Shriver Center.

De-stress this hump day with fellowships, volunteer opportunities, and some reading material

Due 2/13: Michael Maggio Immigrants’ Rights Summer Fellowship 

Since its inception in 2009, the Michael Maggio Immigrants’ Rights Summer Fellowship Program has awarded a dedicated law school student each summer the opportunity to engage in a self-initiated project that strengthens their commitment for advocacy and promotes justice and equality for vulnerable immigrant groups. The Fellowship was established by the Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law (CHRCL), the National Immigration Project of the National Lawyers Guild (NIP/NLG), and the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) to commemorate the life and legal contributions of Michael Maggio and to continue his pursuit for equality and peace. The Fellowship is a wonderful opportunity for any law school student who is driven to raise awareness and fight for the underserved immigrant community.

  The Fellowship awards $2,500 to a law student to work on an immigration related student-initiated project. Applicants must submit a project proposal with an organization willing to host the student for 10 weeks during the summer. The student’s proposal must include a collaborative plan with the host organization to partially match the Fellowship award in the amount of $1,500. This matching may be done by either direct stipend by the host organization or through other means, e.g., law school public interest funding, independent fundraising, etc. This ensures that the student will receive a total funding in the amount of $4,000.

 To learn more about the Fellowship and to download the application form, select here. Also, please visit www.maggiofellowship.org to learn more about Michael Maggio, and to download the application and instructions in Microsoft Word format.

 If you have specific questions about the fellowship program, please contact Marchela Iahdjian, Staff Attorney at marchela@centerforhumanrights.org and Peter Schey, President of the Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law at pschey@centerforhumanrights.org. 

Just What Does it Mean to Lead with your Best Self? by Dan Mulhern

February 9, 2015, Everyday Leadership

Dan MulhernI have been signing-off Reading for Leading for 15 years with the line “lead with your best self.” What do I mean by that? And, more importantly, what do you take from it?

Here is perhaps the acid test of leading with your best self. A story. I moved back to Detroit when I was 28. Ten years earlier, I had left for college, then run a neighborhood center in New Orleans, gone to law school, and returned, impassioned to make a difference in my home city. I really thought I knew a lot, and I wanted to challenge the way things were running which, at the same, seemed abysmal. I got a great job in county government, got active in school board politics, and was reaching out to find out how I could contribute. Somebody told me I should meet with Detroit’s director of parks and recreation; he was a minister, a great guy, I was told. And he agreed to have lunch with me.

I remember that I was confrontative. I wondered, perhaps rudely, how he could deal with the city’s seeming complacency, as more people moved out, racial animosities continued to divide us, schools were being closed, and crime was the only consistent thing going. He din’t take the bait, never got defensive. All he did was encourage me! All he did was ask me my thoughts and opinions. All he did was calmly explain what he and others were trying to accomplish and ask what I thought and how I could help. His kindness disarmed me. His intellectual curiosity kept me from maintaining my judgmental attitude and arrogance. That was in 1988.

I was lucky enough to have my life thread in and around Dan Krichbaum’s for the next 26 years. I am still terribly shook that he was hit by two strokes — and died last week. I honestly can’t imagine Detroit and Michigan and the world without him. Continue reading here.

Help by volunteering at El Centro de la Raza with LBAW’s Legal Clinic

LBAWLBAW is in great need of volunteers (attorneys, law students, translators) for this month’s Legal Clinic on Wednesday, February 11th.  We expect that many people will show up for consultations and we need your help! PLEASE consider volunteering this month and throughout 2015.  The Clinic takes place the 2nd Wednesday of each month at El Centro.

Don’t speak Spanish??  No sweat!  We will provide you with a translator. Just complete the Volunteer Application.  Attorneys needed in the following practice areas:

  • Family Law *especially high need in this area*
  • Immigration
  • Criminal Law *especially high need in this area*
  • Personal Injury
  • Employment Law
  • Property/Landlord Tenant *especially high need in this area*

Law Students and translators needed for intakes and translation.  If you would like to help in another way, please let us know.

Due: 3/16 –2015-2017 Jerry Shestack Justice Fellowship

The Jerry Shestack Justice Fellowship is a two-year litigation-focused fellowship that will be selected on a bi-annual basis by the Lawyers’ Committee in consultation with the Shestack Justice Advisory Committee. Jerry Shestack was an extraordinary lawyer and a driving force in advancing the cause of civil and human rights. One of his greatest legacies was his central role in the founding of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law in 1963.

 Law school graduates who have passed the bar and have 2 to 3 years of outstanding litigation experience and/or judicial clerkships are eligible. The chosen Fellow will have demonstrated a passion and commitment to civil rights issues and public service and have shown promise of becoming an exceptional litigator. Fellows are paid at the same salary of Lawyers’ Committee attorneys with the same number of years of experience.

How to Apply:  Applications are due on March 16, 2015. We expect to announce the successful applicant in June. The Shestack Fellow will begin working at the Lawyers’ Committee in fall 2015. Please apply at https://podio.com/webforms/10775370/768081. Applications must include the following materials:

  • Resume
  • Law school transcript
  • Two page letter of intent
  • Two letters of recommendation
  • Writing sample

This oppressed, unjust (U.S.) American life by Shafaq Hasan

From Nonprofit Quarterly and National Public Radio, WUWM (Milwaukee, WI) 

Increasingly, some outlets are using longer-form journalism to bring their readers or listeners more deeply into an issue. This American Life is one of those outlets, despite the recent kerfuffle about its journalistic chops.

As outgoing Attorney General Eric Holder spends his last few weeks in office speaking to civilians about community relations with their local police departments, the issue is also taking center stage in a new podcast series by This American Life, a weekly radio program recently popularized by the true crime podcast, Serial.

Narrated by Brian Reed, the new two-part series, “Cops See It Differently,” was launched online last Friday and delves into the contentious relations between police departments and their communities, particularly minority communities. It’s an issue that erupted into public discourse last year following the deaths of Eric Garner and Michael Brown, leading to the Black Lives Matter movement.

This first part of the series focuses on the police department in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and ardent, good-intentioned police chief Ed Flynn in particular. By the time he came into the position back in 2008, there were already deep-seated tensions underlying community and police relations in Milwaukee, a city with a great racial divide.

The episode takes listeners through some of the Milwaukee department’s more controversial policing moments, such as the death of 22-year-old Derrick Williams, who died in the back of a squad car after telling officers, “I can’t breathe.” (That’s right; Milwaukee had its own Eric Garner three years before the Staten Island case.) The episode also looks into the aftermath of the police shooting death of mentally ill Dontre Hamilton, which resulted in the firing of the officer and a heated town hall meeting that was frustrating for both the community and police department.

But it’s the prologue of the series that provides the most succinct depiction of how many minorities feel about local police officers. Back in September, Lisa Mahone of Hammond, Indiana, her two children, and her friend Jamal Jones were pulled over for a routine traffic stop that escalated to police officers pulling their guns and demanding Mahone step out of the car. Fearing for her life, Mahone called 911—on the police officers. Continue reading here.

It’s winter time, so warm up with some with these upcoming community events!

Jan. 24, 2015: Body-worn cameras: Will they increase police accountability? 

The Seattle Police Commission will be hosting a panel discussion about the initiation of Seattle Police Department’s body cameras to answer the community’s questions about the new initiative, in light of recent events. Panelists will include: Jay Hollingsworth (John T. Williams Organizing Committee), Marissa Johnson & Dan Bash (Outside Agitators 206), Andrew Myerberg (Assistant City Attorney of Seattle), Jennifer Shaw (ACLU), Detective Ron Smith (Seattle Police Officers’ Guild), and Mike Wagers (Seattle Police Department). The event will be moderated by Fe Lopez. The meeting will be held on Saturday, January 24 from 9:30am to 12:00pm at 7054 32nd Ave South. If you have any questions feel free to contact Tracy Whitlatch at (206) 233-2664 or tracym.whitlatch@seattle.gov.

Jan. 28: Job Search Strategies for People with Disabilities from 12:30-1:20 pm (Room 127)

What kinds of questions can employers ask regarding an applicant’s disability? Should you mention that you have a disability in a cover letter or interview? If so, how do you discuss it? Join the Disability Law Alliance, Diversity Committee, Center for Professionalism and Leadership Development, and Center for Public Service Law for a panel discussion on navigating some legal, professionalism and etiquette issues for people with disabilities seeking employment!

Jan. 27: Homeless youth in Seattle

Presented by: Street Youth Legal Advocates of Washington

SJTThe panel will discuss the challenges of working with homeless youth in the Seattle area. Their experiences include running programs for homeless youth, the mental health aspects of homelessness, and legislative advocacy. They will speak about the legal and non-legal issues facing homeless youth in Seattle, the organizations they work with, and how we as students can help.

Panelists:

  • Ellen Sims, Divine Roots Wellness
  • Hickory Gateless, Center for Children and Youth Justice
  • Katara Jordan, Columbia Legal Services

Jan. 29: Debt and Democracy – How the collection of civil fees and fines contributed to the unrest in Ferguson

This webinar will discuss the levying and collection of unfair fees and fines by municipalities and their courts. According to The New York Times, unjust municipal fee and fine practices were one of the “simmering” issues underlying tensions in Ferguson, Missouri following the killing of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown by a Ferguson police officer. According to The Times, “Young black men in Ferguson and surrounding cities routinely find themselves passed from jail to jail as they are picked up on warrants for unpaid fines.” The webinar will present an overview of the causes, consequences and pervasiveness of the problem, and impact on the community, both in Missouri and around the nation. The webinar will also discuss steps to address the problem, including policy advocacy, legislation and litigation. Register for the webinar here.

Jan 30-31: Arctic Encounter Symposium 

The second annual Arctic Encounter Symposium will challenge participants to tackle the shared interests and concerns of the United States and the global community as we look north to the last emerging frontier – the Arctic. Leading experts, CEOs, and thought leaders from the science, technology, maritime, and energy sectors, will gather to challenge the status quo dialogue, critically address challenges to realizing the Arctic’s full potential and collaborate on solutions. Participants will include key industry leaders, policy makers, and regional stakeholders.

This year’s symposium will focus on the role of the U.S. as an arctic nation and the challenges it will confront in its upcoming chairmanship of the Arctic Council, including: climate change, natural resources, investment opportunities, and international relations. The goal of the 2015 Arctic Encounter is to facilitate a creative environment for the development of a proactive agenda, short and long-term domestic and international priorities, and a strategic execution plan.

The two-day program includes complimentary continental breakfast, coffee, and keynote luncheons on both Friday and Saturday. Participants will enjoy a networking reception and seated dinner at the Museum of History and Industry (MOHAI) at Lake Union on the evening of Friday, January 30. A closing reception will take place at the conclusion of the program on Saturday, January 31.

CLE credit is available to attending attorneys. Please direct questions to mgavin2@uw.edu

The AES Committee is pleased to announce the following committed speakers at this time:

  • Senator Lisa Murkowski, United States Senate – Alaska State Legislature
  • Vice Admiral Charles W. Ray, Pacific Area Commander, U.S. Coast Guard Defense Force West
  • Fran Ulmer, Chair, U.S. Arctic Research Commission
  • Rear Admiral Daniel B. Abel, Commander, 17th Coast Guard District
  • Edward Itta, U.S. Arctic Research Commission, former Mayor of the North Slope Borough of Alaska, former President of the Barrow Whaling Captains Association and the Inuit Circumpolar Council – Alaska
  • Brigadier General Guy Hamel, Royal Canadian Air Force, Deputy Director, Strategy, Policy and Plans, North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) and United States Northern Command (USNORTHCOM)
  • Representative Bob Herron, Co-Chair, Alaska Arctic Policy Commission, Alaska
  • Mikå Mered, Managing Partner, POLARISK Group – London
  • Marilyn Heiman, Director, U.S. Arctic Program, The Pew Charitable Trusts
  • Brendan Kelly, Chief Scientist, Monterey Bay Aquarium, former Assistant Director for Polar Sciences, The White House
  • Rick Fox, President & General Manager, Edison Chouest Offshore
  • Senator Lesil McGuire, Co-Chair, Alaska Arctic Policy Commission, Alaska State Legislature
  • Dr. Lawson Brigham, Distinguished Professor of Geography & Arctic Policy, University of Alaska Fairbanks; and Fellow, U.S. Coast Guard Academy Center for Arctic Studies & Policy
  • Mead Treadwell, Owner, Treadwell Development; Lieutenant Governor of Alaska, 2010-2014; Advisor and Former Chair, U.S. Arctic Research Commission
  • Adrianna Muir, Ph.D., Deputy Senior Arctic Official, U.S. Department of State
  • Alice Rogoff, Publisher, Alaska Dispatch News; Co-Founder, The Arctic Circle
  • Dr. James Kendall, Regional Director, Alaska OCS Region, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management
  • Michael K. Young, President, The University of Washington
  • Kellye Testy, Dean, UW School of Law
  • Craig H. Allen Sr., Judson Falknor Professor of Law; Director, UW Arctic Law & Policy Institute
  • Reggie Joule, Mayor, The Northwest Arctic Borough
  • Rachel Kallander, Founder & Executive Director, Arctic Encounter Symposium; Manager, Kallander & Associates LLC
  • John Iani, Partner, Perkins Coie LLP
  • Chris Gregorich, Chief of Staff, The Office of Mayor Murray, City of Seattle
  • Steve Wackowski, Operations Manager, Tulugaq, LLC
  • Captain John Reeves, USCG Cutter HEALY

Feb. 4: Panel on the Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act

The Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act (PTFA), which offered important protections to tenants in  residential property subject to foreclosure, expired at the end of 2014. Housing advocates are invited to join us for a free webinar to discuss strategies to protect tenants post-PTFA. Five panelists, including Jeremy Bergstrom of the Shriver Center, Kent Qian of the National Housing Law Project, Tristia Bauman of the National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty, Matt Hill of the Public Justice Center, and Linda Couch of the National Low Income Housing Coalition, will discuss the implications of the PTFA’s expiration and state initiatives to pass similar protections.Feb. 4: Panel about the Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act

Happy Halloween! Celebrate Dia de Los Muertos with El Centro de la Raza!

November 1: 10th Annual Dia De Los Muertos Event with El Centro de la Raza

La_raza_central

Saturday, Nov. 1, 2014
5:00 – 9:00 PM
El Centro de la Raza

El Centro de la Raza will hold its 10th annual Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) event this Saturday, November 1st from 5pm to 9pm. A chicken mole dinner will be served from 5:30pm to 7pm.

This year we call attention to the humanitarian crisis of the refugee children of Central America, the children who have died from violence in their countries, and the moral obligation of the U.S. to respond humanely to this catastrophe.

November 3: Registration Now Open for “Beyond the Headlines: National Security in the 21st Century” with Assistant Secretary of State Puneet Talwar

World Globe Flags

Monday, Nov. 3, 2014
6:00 PM
City University, 521 Wall St. Seattle, WA 98121

The World Affairs Council is hosting Puneet Talwar, Assistant Secretary for the Bureau of Political-Military Affairs. Assistant Secretary of State Talwar will give an overview of the crowded roster of international crises and ongoing threats to U.S. security and interests—from ISIL to Russia to emerging threats. Informed by his current position at the State Department and his previous experience at the White House and Capitol Hill, Talwar will discuss current policy direction and U.S. efforts, including security partnerships, to counter the threats the United States currently faces—including those that are not necessarily making headlines. Yet.

Register now, tickets are limited.  

Click here to register online.

November 4: Ferguson – What’s Next?

UW Bothell

Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2014
1:30 – 3:00 PM
Discovery Hall-061

Join the First Year and Pre Major (CUSP) Office for a fireside chat on Ferguson, Missouri and the Aftermath of the shooting of Michael Brown.

We will be hosting Dr. Alexis Harris, Associate Professor of Sociology at UW Seattle, Dr. John Vinson, Chief of Police, UW Police Department, and Marcus Johnson, Graduate Student from the Masters of Cultural Studies Program at UW Bothel.

The conversation will be moderated and the audience will have the opportunity to interact with our guests and each other.

November 3, 5, 13: Three Public Meetings to Inform Rulemaking for the Minimum Wage Ordinance (MWO)

City of Seattle Logo

Seattle’s new Minimum Wage Ordinance will take effect on April 1, 2015! The Seattle Office for Civil Rights is hosting 3 public meetings to gather information for the administrative rulemaking process:

Monday, Nov.3, 2014
2:00 – 4:00 PM
Bertha Landes Room at Seattle City Hall, 600 4th Ave., Seattle, WA
RSVP for 11/3 here.

Wednesday, Nov. 5, 2014
7:00 – 9:00 PM
NewHolly Gathering Hall, 7054 32nd Ave. S., Seattle, WA
RSVP for 11/5 here.

Thursday, Nov. 13, 2014
8:00 – 10:00 AM
Northgate Community Center, 10510 5th Ave. NE., Seattle, WA
RSVP for 11/13 here.

We want to hear from you! We know that employers and employees have many questions about how the Minimum Wage Ordinance will be implemented. Registration is not required, but it is helpful for planning. Reasonable accommodations and language interpretation for meetings are available on request. Call 206-684-4507 for more information. Childcare will be available for the evening meeting on Wednesday, November 5. Please note any other special requests on your registration form.

New City website for information on Minimum Wage Ordinance

Visit http://www.seattle.gov/civilrights/minimumwage.htm for up-to-date information about Seattle’s Minimum Wage Ordinance. The website features a new Frequently Asked Questions section, plus links to the ordinance and contact information for submitting questions and comments. The site also will list other public meetings and events as they are scheduled.

November 4: Social Justice Tuesday – Justified? Examining Police Brutality and Civil Rights Issues

SJT Logo

Join the Center for Public Service Law and the Dean’s Advisory Committee on Diversity for a conversation with:

  • David Whedbee (attorney, MacDonald Hoague & Bayless)
  • Fe Lopez (Executive Director, City of Seattle-Community Police Commission

If you would like lunch please RSVP via Symplicity or gatespsl@uw.edu RSVP by 12:00 pm, Monday, November 3, 2014.

November 5: General Externship Perspectives Seminar – Lawyer Mistakes: Lessons in Professionalism

cropped-cpsl-logo1.jpg

Wednesday, Nov. 5, 2014
5:30 PM
Gates Hall, RM 207

Join the General Externship Perspectives Seminar on Wednesday, November 5 at 5:30 p.m. in room 207 to hear guests David West and Travis Stearns discuss lawyer mistakes.  Mr. West handles risk management for the Garvey Schubert Barer firm.  Mr.  Stearns, a long time public defender, works with the Washington Defender Association.

November 5: Tacoma Joint Networking Event

wsba2

Wednesday, Nov. 5, 2014
5:00 – 6:30 PM
The Matador, 721 Pacific Ave., Tacoma, WA 98402

The Minority Bar Associations (MBAs), together with the Washington State Bar Association (WSBA), invite you to a joint networking event in Tacoma.  This is your opportunity to meet and mingle with fellow attorneys in and around the South Sound.  Join us!  Light appetizers will be served with no host bar.

RSVP by Monday, November 3 to: diversity @wsba.org.

Sponsoring MBAs: Mother Attorneys Mentoring Association of Seattle (MAMAS), Pierce County Minority Bar Association (PCMBA), South Asian Bar Association of Washington (SABAW), Vietnamese Bar Association of Washington (VABAW), and Washington Women Lawyers (WWL).

November 6: Children’s Alliance Annual Meeting

Children's Alliance Logo

Thursday, Nov. 6, 2014
Doors open at 8:30 AM
Program 9:00 AM – 10:30 AM
Northwest African American Museum, 2300 S. Massachusetts St., Seattle, WA 98144

Please join us at our Annual Meeting on Thursday, November 6th. RSVP today!

This free event features a light breakfast, a dialogue with legislators, and an opportunity hear what is at stake for kids in the 2015 legislative session.  The panel discussion with state legislators will focus on advocacy strategies to advance race equity and improve the lives of all Washington’s children.  Bring a friend, your questions for legislators, and your voice for kids!

Children are welcome and a space for children’s activities will be provided. You are invited to enjoy the exhibits of the NW African American Museum following the event. Please RSVP online or contact Emijah Smith at 206.342.0340 x25.

December 12: Save the Date & Register Early for the A Day of Transforming Trauma with Laura van Dernoot Lipsky

Photo of Laura van Dernoot Lipsky

Friday, Dec. 12, 2014
8:30 AM – 3:30 PM
Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98101

PLEASE JOIN US in Seattle for this not to be
missed workshop offering a practical and holistic approach of sustaining ourselves individually and collectively. Whether you are a nurse, teacher, conservationist, journalist, doctor, police officer, firefighter, community organizer, biologist, or
caring for a loved one in need, this day is for you. 

Laura van Dernoot Lipsky will offer a compelling
mix of personal insight, cutting edge research,
personal stories, and countless New Yorker cartoons
to help us understand the cumulative toll of being exposed to suffering over time and gain concrete
skills to reconcile it.

Participants are welcome from all professional disciplines and life circumstances.

CEUs: 5 hours are available for: Nurses, Psychologists, Professional Counselors,
Certified Counselors, Alcohol & Drug Abuse Counselors, Social Workers, Marriage & Family Therapists 

The cost for CEUs is $30 and must be paid for at the time of registration. 

Early bird rate through November 1st:
Per Day – Individual Rate:  $80
Per Day – Group Rate (5 or more):  $70

After November 1st:
Per Day – Individual Rate:  $90
Per Day – Group Rate:  $80 

Register online here.