Interested in Volunteering for the UN? Join the Discussion with UW Law Alumna, Johanna Gusman!

December 3: A Conversation with Johanna Gusman on UN Volunteer Work

Johanna Gusman

Date: Thursday, Dec. 3, 2015
Time: 8:30 AM
Location: TBA (Please contact Professor Anita Ramasastry)

Next Thursday Johanna Gusman, a UW Law School alumna and Gates Scholar, will visit us from Cairo via a Google hangout, to discuss how to work as a UN Volunteer (which is actually a quasi paid opportunity).  This is a great way for lawyers and others to get their “foot in the door” to work with the UN on longer term contracts.  We will connect with her online at 8:30 a.m. on 12/3 — Room TBA.  For those of you who are not in Seattle or who need to listen from home, please contact Professor Anita Ramasastry as soon as possible, and she will transmit instructions for how to join us via Google.

For more information, please contact Professor Ramasastry at arama@uw.edu.

December 4: Rahul Gairola Presentation on Migrations in Absentia: Digital Advertising & Manipulation of Partition Trauma

Rahul Gairola

Date: Friday, Dec. 4, 2015
Time: 3:30 PM – 4:30 PM
Location: Seattle University, Hunthausen Hall 100

This paper contributes to existing and new scholarship in Partition and affect studies, on the one hand, and cultural and digital humanities studies, on the other, as the 70th anniversary of the geo- political division of South Asia approaches in 2017. I begin by proposing a rationale for two digital advertisements by Google and Coca Cola that attempt to capitalize on the trauma of Partition by celebrating both products as facilitating harmony between India and Pakistan. Indeed, these advertisements market “happiness” as the ultimate horizon of neoliberal experience for the subjects that they depict.

While I do not here want to undermine the nostalgic value or the raw emotions behind the subjects and sentiments portrayed, I would argue that it is crucial to question the ethical dilemmas of marketing products that utopically represent the Partition’s communal bloodshed. In particular, these advertisements promise what I call “migrations in absentia,” or the promise of movement across borders without moving from one’s geo-political space. I conclude that despite the hege-monic pull of both ads, a number of resistant representations counter their influence in the digital public sphere

Rahul Krishna Gairola is an Assistant Professor of English & Comparative Liter-ature at the Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, India. He is, with Amritjit Singh and Nalini Iyer, co-editor of a collection of essays titled Revisiting India’s Partition: Poli-tics, Memories, & Culture (Lexington Books/ Rowman & Littlefield, 2016). He is working on two additional book projects – Homelandings: Diasporic Genealogies of Belonging in Nation and Digital Homes: Electronic Agency in 21st Century South Asia. He is an Article Editor for Postcolonial Text, and Editor of salaam: the newslet-ter of the south asian literary association.

For more information, contact the English Department at 296-5420

December 10: RSJI Speaker Series Presents Kimberlé Crenshaw – Annual Human Rights Day Celebration – Black Lives Matter

RSJI Speaker Series Logo

Date: Thursday, Dec. 10, 2015
Time: 7:00 PM
Location: Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., Seattle, WA 98101

The event is free and open to the public. Tickets are not required.
Please join us for a reception starting at 6:00 pm. Light refreshments will be served.

Kimberlé Crenshaw teaches Civil Rights and other courses in critical race studies and constitutional law. Her primary scholarly interests center around race and the law, and she was a founder and has been a leader in the intellectual movement called Critical Race Theory. She was elected Professor of the Year by the 1991 and 1994 graduating classes. She now splits her time each year between UCLA and the Columbia School of Law.

At the University of Wisconsin Law School, where she received her LL.M., Professor Crenshaw was a William H. Hastie Fellow. She then clerked for Justice Shirley Abrahamson of the Wisconsin Supreme Court.

In 2007, Professor Crenshaw was awarded the Fulbright Chair for Latin America in Brazil. In 2008, she was nominated an Alphonse Fletcher Fellow. In the same year she joined the selective group of scholars awarded with an in-residence fellowship at the Center of Advanced Behavioral Studies at Stanford.

For more information, click here.

December 15: Conversations: Charlesworth and Chinkin Re-Examine the Boundaries of International Law

Hilary Charlesworth and Christine Chinkin

Date: Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2015
Time: 6:30 PM – 8:00 PM
Location: LSE Centre for Women, Peace and Security, London, UK

In 2000 ‘The Boundaries of International Law: a feminist analysis’ shone a spotlight on the status of women in human rights and international law. The authors, Hilary Charlesworth and Christine Chinkin, took a critical look at the development of international law, arguing that the absence of women had produced a narrow and inadequate jurisprudence that legitimated the unequal position of women rather than confronted it. They called for the boundaries of international law to be redrawn to create more equitable status of women in society.

15 years on, Charlesworth and Chinkin revisit their ground-breaking feminist analysis. What has been achieved, and what challenges remain?

To register, click here.

Is your calendar looking empty? Add these informative events to your schedule!

2/20: City Council Hearing on Tenant Relocation

Want to learn more about rising rents? Want to learn more about city government? Attend a Seattle City Council Meeting on Tenant Relocation.

Many of you have been hearing about the epidemic of displacement in Seattle through our emails, the news, or your friends. Or perhaps you have experienced displacement yourself. From the Lockhaven to the Theodora to buildings in Columbia City, the Tenants Union has been supporting tenants who resist development and displacement. We will continue to support tenants in their building fights, but we also need to organize for legislative change to slow the system down.

Please join us at our first mobilization and teach-in for the campaign. The event will take place on Friday, February 20th  at 2:00 PM at the City Hall Council Chambers 600 4th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104.

2/22: Urban Poverty Forum (The New Debt)

This annual event sustains a local dialogue among diverse community voices around the systemic issues of urban poverty. This year’s program addresses debt–in particular, how debt impacts poor people (particularly people of color) in the Pacific Northwest. Speakers include Eddie Rye, host of the Urban Forum Northwest on 1150 AM Radio; Pamela Banks, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Urban League; Jonathan Grant, Executive Director of the Tenants Union; and tenants themselves, telling their own stories. The program also features a dramatic performance by The Mahogany Project. Learn from faith-based organizations, local nonprofits, and other concerned citizens about their efforts to help local citizens survive what’s been characterized as a “national epidemic” of consumer debt.

2/24: Social Justice Tuesday – “How to write a successful public interest grant application”

SJTPlease join us in Room 127 at 12:30 PM to learn more about the grant application process. Topics of discussion and questions answered: What to expect on a grant application? Where to find grant applications? Working with your organization/internship to prepare a grant application? Tips for writing applications?

 Please join:

  • Aline Carton-Listfjeld (Director Center for Public Service Law)
  • Tamara Gaffney-Curtin Fellowship  (PILA Grantee)
  • Anna Rae Goethe (Joan Fitzpatrick Fellowship)
  • Chris Pierce-Wright (PILA Grantee)
  • Emily Elijah (CHRJ/PILA Grantee)

2/26 & 3/31: Equal Justice Work Live Loan Repayment Webinars

Understanding loan repayment and public service loan forgiveness are key to a public service legal career. Equal Justice Works is offering free, live webinars on 2/26 and 3/31 to help. Sign up for a live webinar that works for your schedule – (2/26 3pm ET) http://ow.ly/JhPjo or (3/31 6pm ET) http://ow.ly/JhPug. Register even if you cannot attend. You will be sent a link to the recording of the webinar.

2/26: Diversity & Justice Fair (3:00 PM – 5:00 PM)

Featured Speaker: BERNARD KLEINA, Photographer & Civil Rights Activist

Join us for an open discussion on Diversity and Justice issues in our community! Celebrate the unveiling of the MLK Jr. photographs in­stalled at the UW School of Law & hear from the photographer, Ber­nard Kleina. Mr. Kleina is a founding member of the National Fair Housing Alliance and past President of the Chicago Area Fair Housing Alliance. Join us in welcoming Mr. Kleina and hear about his experi­ence documenting the historic civil rights movement through his photography.

First floor Galleria, UW School of Law, William H. Gates Hall, 4293 Memorial Way

2/27: 2015 Supreme Court Forum and Networking Reception

The Washington State Access to Justice Board will host a Supreme Court Forum and Networking Reception immediately following the Annual Goldmark Award Luncheon, a statewide convening of attorneys, judges, and students. During the Forum, Justices will participate in interactive discussions on topics pertinent to civil legal aid and access to justice, including leadership, race equity and the role of the justice system, and alternative structures for providing access to justice. The forum will conclude with a reception where individuals can continue the conversation and learn more about the exciting work of the Access to Justice Board.

 Forum & reception: To register for the forum and the reception, please email Ann Spangler, [spangler@uw.edu]spangler@uw.edu, by February 24, and indicate which programs (Forum from 2:00pm – 3:30pm and/or Reception from 3:30pm – 5:00pm) you plan on attending.

 3/4: What is social justice philanthropy?

Why does it mattter? How can YOU get involved? Join us on March 4 from 12:30 PM -2:00 PM at the Ethnic Cultural Center, Chicano Room to hear from our panelists about their experiences with social justice philanthropy. Panelists will include: Tammy Nguyen (Got Green), Christine Angtuaco (Evans School MPA Candidate), and Professor David Suarez (Evans School of Public Affairs). the vent will be moderated by our own Laurie Carlsson.

3/5-3/6: 8th Annual Feminist Legal Theory Conference

Hosted by the Center for Applied Feminism at the University of Baltimore School of Law, this two-day conference will highlight important issues in women’s rights and analyze how the Feminist Legal Theory lens can be applied in legal analysis. The event will take place at University of Baltimore School of Law (John and Frances Angelos Law Center) and will feature keynote speaker Chai Feldbaum (EEOC Commissioner).

Celebrate Human Rights Day by Learning More about Homelessness Online!

December 10: How to Make Human & Civil Rights Real – Homelessness and Beyond Webinar

national law center housing

Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014
2:00 – 3:00 PM EST / 10:00 -11:00 AM PST

On Human Rights Day, Wednesday, December 10, the National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty will host a free webinar discussing the criminalization of homelessness as a violation of civil and human rights, and strategies advocates can use to work toward solutions.

The webinar will discuss three forthcoming reports from the Law Center, including:

The webinar will include updates on recent human rights advocacy to address the criminalization of homelessness, methods that individual advocates can employ in their work, and the important role the federal government has in combating criminalization.

To register for the webinar, click here.

January 13: A Panel Discussion on Compensated Surrogacy

WLR Logo

Tuesday, Jan. 13, 2014
6:00 PM
William H. Gates Hall, RM 138

Please join Washington Law Review on Tuesday, January 13, 2015 at 6:00 pm for a panel discussion on Compensated Surrogacy, the subject of our December 2014 symposium issue.

Compensated surrogacy is an arrangement in which a woman carries and gives birth to a child in exchange for money. Such an arrangement affects many parties—the child born, the surrogate, the parents who wish to raise the child, the donors of genetic material, and others. But in the United States, surrogacy remains a largely unregulated area. The December 2014 issue of Washington Law Review is dedicated to scholarship addressing compensated surrogacy and the legal and political implications for groups affected.

THE PANEL INCLUDES:

Peter Nicolas is the Jeffrey & Susan Brotman Endowed Professor of Law at the University of
Washington School of Law. His article, “Straddling the Columbia” discusses his own experiences  as an intended parent of a surrogacy arrangement, before ultimately concluding that surrogacy arrangements merit constitutional protection.

Terry Price is the Associate Director of the Center for Law in Science and Global Health at the
University of Washington School of Law. His article, “The Future of Compensated Surrogacy
in Washington State: Anytime Soon?” discusses the legislative history of attempts to regulate
compensated surrogacy in Washington State.

Sara Ainsworth is the Director of Legal Advocacy at the National Advocates for Pregnant Women. Her article, “Bearing Children, Bearing Risks” approaches the topic of compensated surrogacy from a feminist perspective, with the goal of drawing more feminist voices into this ongoing discussion.

This panel will be moderated by Kellye Testy, Dean of the University of Washington School of Law.

Click here to RSVP.

January 20: Attorney General 8th Annual Open House

WA AGO seal

Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2014
3:30 – 5:30 PM
800 5th Ave., Suite 2000, Seattle, WA (Bank of America, Fifth Avenue Plaza Bldg.)

The Attorney General’s Office (AGO) serves more than 230 state agencies, boards, commissions, colleges and universities, as well as the Legislature and the Governor. The mission of the Office is to deliver the highest quality professional legal services to officials, agencies and citizens of the state of Washington. The Office is comprised of over 500 attorneys and 600 professional staff.

Assistant Attorneys General from many of the AGO’s divisions will be in attendance to speak about opportunities that exist within their divisions and the AGO. Information about the Office’s volunteer law clerk recruitment program for first and second year law students will also be available.