2016 Martin Luther King, Jr. Week @ UW!

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Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and his legacy of strength, resilience and compassion are a worldwide touchstone of civic responsibility and action. This January, honor his memory and the contributions of all people — past and present — who stand for justice, and join the University of Washington’s MLK Week!

Celebrate and carry on Dr. King’s legacy with your UW community by participating in these and other MLK Week events. Find more details here.

SIGNATURE EVENTS TO ADD TO YOUR CALENDAR:

  • 1/9/16 | Nonviolent Direct Action Training | 9:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m. | New Holly Gathering Hall
  • 1/13/16 | MLK Jr. Tribute | 11:30 a.m.-1:15 p.m. | Magnuson Health Sciences
  • 1/14/16 | Dr. Ralina Joseph, What’s the Difference with “Difference”? | 7:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m. | Kane Hall
  • 1/15/16 | MLK Birthday Party and Kickoff!| 11:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m. |HUB Street
  • 1/18/16 | MLK Day of Service | 9 a.m.–4 p.m. | Locations Vary
  • 1/20/16 | Race and the Legacy of Dr. King: The Sequel | 12–1:30 p.m. | Kelly Ethnic Cultural Center
  • 1/20/16 | Unconscious Bias Workshop | 4–6 p.m. | Kelly Ethnic Cultural Center
  • 1/21/16 | Ask Your Mama: 12 Moods for Jazz | 8–10 p.m. | Ethnic Cultural Theater
  • 1/22/16 | Black Lives Matter Teach-In | 9:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m. | Kelly Ethnic Cultural Center

Join the King County Bar Association at the Annual Luncheon in January!

January 15: King County Bar Association’s Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Annual Luncheon

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Date: Friday, Jan. 15, 2016
Time: 12:00 PM – 1:15 PM
Location: Sheraton Seattle Hotel, 1400 Sixth Avenue, Seattle, WA

Tickets:
$50 General Admission;
$25 Students & Law Clerks

Featuring: C.T. Vivian
Legendary Civil Right Advisor
Presidential Civil Rights Advisor
Founder, C.T. Vivian Leadership Institute

In November 2013, Dr. Vivian was honored for his vision and leadership in the fight for justice when he was awarded this Nation’s highest civilian honor—The Presidential Medal of Freedom. Among his many leadership roles, he has served on the board of the Center for Democratic Renewal and the National Voting Rights Museum. He currently serves as a founding Board Member of Capital City Bank, a Blackowned bank in Atlanta, and is also Board Chair of BASIC Diversity, Inc., the Nation’s oldest diversity consulting firm. He has provided civil rights counsel to Presidents Johnson, Carter, Reagan, Clinton, and Obama, and he continues to lecture on racial justice and democracy throughout the world.

The New School for Social Research named Dr. C.T. Vivian “… spiritual leader, apostle of social justice, strategist of the civil rights movement … For decades he has been in the vanguard of the struggle for racial equality in America,” as they presented him with one of his many honorary doctorates.

Dr. Vivian, once known as a Christian journalist, is best known for his work with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. As National Director of Affiliates, and strategist for every Southern Christian Leadership Conference (S.C.L.C.) organization, he truly helped change the nation. In Birmingham, his work helped to enact the Civil Rights Bill, and in Selma, the Voting Rights Bill. Vivian was deeply involved in other civil rights movements in Nashville, TN; Danville, VA; St. Augustine, FL; and Chicago, IL. Dr. Vivian won his first non-violent direct action movement in 1947 by integrating restaurants in Peoria, IL. The summer following the Selma Movement, Dr. Vivian developed, organized, and launched Vision, an educational program that provided over 700 Alabama students with college scholarships. Vision would later be known as Upward Bound. In 1970 Vivian authored the first book written by a member of Dr. King’s staff entitled Black Power and the American Myth.

He is featured throughout PBS’s acclaimed documentary Eyes On The Prize (1987 & 2006). PBS later produced a full-length presentation, The Healing Ministry of the Rev. Dr. C.T. Vivian. He is also featured as both an activist and analyst in the series, The People’s Century (PBS/WGBH, 1998), and in the Tom Brokaw documentary King (History Channel, 2008).

After leaving Dr. King’s Executive Staff, Dr. Vivian trained ministers and developed the urban curriculum for seminaries throughout the nation at the Urban Training Center in Chicago. He returned to the realm of seminary education as the Dean of Divinity at Shaw University Seminary. There he originated and acquired funding for an unprecedented national-wide program, the basis of his doctoral work, Seminary Without Walls. In 2008, Dr. Vivian founded the C.T. Vivian Leadership Institute, Inc., based in Atlanta, Georgia, to create a model leadership culture for the purpose of training and educating the new generation of grass-roots leaders. More recently, Dr. Vivian received an Honorary Doctorate from Morehouse College (2010), served as National President of S.C.L.C. (2012), and currently serves as Dean of The Urban Institute at The Interdenominational Theological Center in Atlanta, Georgia.

To register, click here.

January 21: Washington Young Lawyers Committee Invites Law Students to the WSBA Open Sections Night

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Date: Thursday, Jan. 15, 2016
Time: 5:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Location: WSBA Conference Center, 1325 Fourth Ave., Ste. 600, Seattle, WA 98101

RSVP: By January 8, 2016

The Washington Young Lawyers Committee (WYLC) is pleased to invite law students from the University of Washington and Seattle University to attend the popular Washington State Bar Association (WSBA) Open Sections Night to be held in Seattle, Washington on January 21. Open Sections Night connects new and young lawyers to WSBA Sections, which offer a wealth of experience and resources to help new and young lawyers find their footing in the legal profession. Please help us spread the word by sharing this event and our attached flier with faculty and law students at your respective university.

Law students attend Open Sections Night to:

  • Learn more about the WYLC WSBA’s 28 sections
  • Join a section on site and enter for a chance to win a door prize
  • Mingle with new and experienced attorneys
  • Enjoy light appetizers and beverages

To RSVP, click here.

March 5-6: Save the Date for the 18th Annual Trina Grillo Public Interest and Social Justice Retreat

UNLV School of Law

Date: Saturday, Mar. 5 – Sunday, Mar. 6, 2016
Location: 4505 S. Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV 89011

The Trina Grillo Retreat provides a unique opportunity for public interest and social justice-oriented law students, faculty, and practitioners to forge an alliance by exchanging viewpoints, exploring career opportunities, and formulating strategies for social justice.

Hotel Accommodations for Retreat

For your convenience, we have reserved a block of rooms at the following hotel:

Silver Sevens Hotel & Casino
4100 Paradise Rd.
Las Vegas, NV 89169
(702) 733-7000
Group Code: Trina 2016
Reservations: (800) 640-9777

Room rates are set at $92.94 (tax & fees included) for March 5th only. Rate available through February 1, 2016 (depending on room availability). 2016 NASCAR Weekend and Rugby 7s are the same weekend as the Retreat, so be sure to book your room early.

CONFIRMED CONSORTIUM CO-SPONSORS

Santa Clara University School of Law
Society of American Law Teachers
Southwestern Law School
Stanford Law School
UNLV William S. Boyd School of Law
University of Washington School of Law
University of San Francisco School of Law
UC Berkeley School of Law

For more information, click here.

May 19: Save the Date for Eastside Legal Assistance Program’s Breakfast for Justice

ELAP Save the Date 2016

Date: Thursday, May 19, 2016
Time: 7:00 PM (Registration); 7:30 PM – 8:30 PM (Program)
Location: Meydenbauer Center, 11100 NE 6th St., Bellevue, WA 98004

Suggested minimum donation: $150

We invite you to join our distinguished host committee on Thursday, May 19, 2016, for the 6th Annual ELAP Breakfast for Justice and help support legal services for low-income families and survivors of domestic violence.

Keynote: James Bamberger, the Director of Washington’s Office of Civil Legal Aid

In his keynote address, James Bamberger, will present the recent findings about the increased “Justice Gap” impacting low-income residents of Washington State. The updated Civil Legal Needs Study reveals that the need for securing equal access to justice is greater than ever. You won’t want to miss this compelling speech.

Need to Learn the Ins and Outs of Getting Funding? Look No Further!

Post Graduate Short Term Public Service Funding 2014

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The Post-Graduate Fellowship Program was initiated in 2013 and seeks to support new UW law graduates who are seeking employment, and who wish to provide legal services for underserved populations, by providing limited financial support while Fellows continue to search for permanent positions after the bar exam. This support will allow Fellows to continue to develop skills, contacts, and professional experience through short-term volunteer work, enabling them to better compete for permanent positions once they become available.

Each fellow must volunteer with an eligible sponsor organization, doing work that requires a JD or draws heavily on the Fellow’s legal education and training. Eligible work may include, for example, legal advocacy, direct legal services, impact litigation, or community education and organizing.

Fellowship awards will consist of a maximum of $1500 per Fellow, renewable on a monthly basis, for a maximum of four months (up to $6000 total). Fellowships must begin between August 1, 2014 and September 30, 2014, and may end no later than January 31, 2015. Fellowships will end when the Fellow finds a permanent position or at the end of the four-month fellowship period, whichever comes sooner. Recipients and sponsoring agencies will be required to certify that they will adhere to each of the goals and guidelines of the Fellowship program.

The University of Washington School of Law is accepting applications from June 2014 graduates for a limited number of short-term, post-graduate Fellowships. Applications can be accessed on Symplicity and must be uploaded to Symplicity no later than Sunday, May 4, 2014 at 11:59 p.m.

Questions?  Contact Dean Storms.

Social Justice, Conflict Resolution, and Reconciliation: An Introductory Workshop to Kingian Nonviolence on May 1-2

Martin Luther King Jr.

Hosted by: University of Washington and Bellevue College

Kingian Nonviolence is a framework for transforming and reconciling conflict that was developed out of the teachings of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and the organizing strategies of the Civil Rights Movement. The goal is to prevent violence, yes, but its ambitions are even bigger: to pursue reconciliation by putting strength and agency in the hands of those who choose to act, talk, and think in healthy, humanly-connected ways that pursue a common higher ground. An approach of nonviolence, as a result, has wide applicability for how people set goals, declare values, and interact with others. In this workshop we will study the nature of human conflict, the roots of violence, the principles of nonviolence, and the “six steps of Kingian Nonviolence,” which will discuss the role of direct action, education, negotiation, and other steps critical in movement building. Specifically, we will address strategies and principles on how to respond to both interpersonal conflict as well as larger social conflicts.

Dates and Cost

We ask participants to commit to both days of the workshop.

May 1 @ Bellevue College: 4:00 – 4:30 PM sign-in, 4:30 – 8:30 PM
May 2 @ University of Washington, 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM

Cost is $25 per person, to be paid in cash or check at registration sign-in. An introductory manual is included in this fee. Specific room details will be provided after registration; sandwiches and snacks will be provided each day.

For more information, click here.

Working in Civil Legal Aid, Public Defense or Gov’t Agency this Summer? Still Looking for Summer Funding? Americorps JD May be Right for You! Deadline Extended to May 2

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The deadline for students to apply to our AmeriCorps JD program to receive a $1,175 Segal AmeriCorps Education Award has been extended through May 2.

We have more spots available for students working with various populations in any area of law in addition to funding for students providing legal services to veterans, including those serving at legal aid, public defender, other nonprofit organizations, or local, county or state government agencies.

These funds are currently underutilized, so please take advantage of this invaluable opportunity!  By completing a simple application and consenting to a background check, students have the opportunity to earn additional funds for the work they are already doing this summer and throughout the school year while still being able to receive outside funding up to $4,300.

For a step by step guide on the application process, click here.  Click here to apply online.

Show me the money! Resources and Tips for Grant writing from the Gallagher Law Library

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Photo courtesy of Ghallagher Blogs

Want to start your own legal services or social justice organization? The Gallagher Law Library has compiled some fabulous resources for public service startups.

Check it out here.

 

 

Final Reminder! Report Pro Bono Hours by Monday, April 28!

Wouldn’t it be amazing if we could say 100% of UW Law students, faculty and staff give back to the community!?   

  • Did you volunteer for IFAP, IMAP, SYLAW, ITMP, ELS, research project  NW Detention Center Project or a community-based legal organization between April 2013 and March 2014?

 

    • Did you volunteer as a case manager or leader for one of these student-led pro bono projects?
  • Did you intern last summer for a public interest organization and didn’t get a summer grant, stipend or externship credit?

 

If you can answer YES to any of these questions you are likely eligible to participate in the Pro Bono Honors Program!

APRIL 28 IS FAST APPROACHING! And, it’s the last day to submit the online form so that you can be recognized with fellow students, faculty and staff with a Pro Bono Service Award! Don’t forget the program recognizes student leaders pro bono legal assistance projects as well as legal assistance hours. 2Ls, 3Ls and LLM students with 30 hours (10 hours for 1Ls) of qualifying pro bono service will be recognized.

Your efforts are greatly appreciated and you will be recognized at the May 8 PILA TGIT!

 Not in it for the award? We get it. The Pro Bono Honors Program though gives us the opportunity to tell the story of UW Law and what our commitment to public service really looks like.  We are also able to pull together resources to help future generations of students connect to the volunteer opportunities that resonate for them.  So please take the time to do this!

Law Student Checklist:

For First-Time Student Participants

  • Tie your UWNet ID to a GMail account if you haven’t already.
  • Make sure your pro bono work qualifies or contact acarton@uw.edu if you’re not sure.
  • Attend the Annual Core Competencies Training on October 12, 2013. Missed a training? Go to our training page for resources and podcasts.
  • Keep track of your hours (download optional tracking log):
    • We’ll need you to tell us if you you’re providing direct legal assistance and/or if you’ve been in a pro bono leadership role.
    • You’ll need a minimum of 30 hours performed between April 1, 2013 and March 31, 2014.
  • Draft Essay: Write a 600-1000 word reflective essay about your pro bono work experience, observations made about the clients you’ve served or the organization you worked for and/or reflections about your professional path in public service law.
  • Certify training attendance, report hours and submit essay by Monday, April 28: Complete the online web form.

For Returning Student Participants

  • Tie your UWNet ID to a GMail account if you haven’t already.
  • Make sure your pro bono work qualifies or contact acarton@uw.edu if you’re not sure.
  • Keep track of your hours (download optional tracking log):
    • We’ll need you to tell us if you you’re providing direct legal assistance and/or if you’ve been in a pro bono leadership role.
    • You’ll need a minimum of 30 hours performed between April 1, 2013 and March 31, 2014.
  • Report hours by Monday, April 28: Complete the online web form.

Do You Enjoy Free Film Screenings? Check Out These Amazing Films!

April 21: Special Free Screening of “Documented” in Seattle

Monday, Apr. 21, 2014
6:30 PM, Siff Uptown Cinema, 511 Queen Anne Avenue North, Seattle, WA
Q&A with Jose Antonio Vargas and Eric Liu after the film

Tickets are FREE, but please RSVP online here.

In 2011, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas outed himself as an undocumented immigrant in the New York Times Magazine. DOCUMENTED chronicles his journey to America from the Philippines as a child; his public struggle as an immigration reform activist/provocateur; and his journey inward as he reconnects with his mother, whom he hasn’t seen in 20 years. A broken immigration system leads to broken families and broken lives. 

Click here for more information.

April 22: Social Justice Tuesday- American Indian Children and Families:  Understanding the History and Experiences that Inform Native People’s Interactions with U.S. Legal Systems

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12:30-1:20, Room 133

Speaker:  Dian Million, Ph.D.  Associate Professor of American Indian Studies at the University of Washington.

Hosted by: The Incarcerated Mothers Advocacy Project

Description:  Dr. Million (Tanana Athabascan) is a poet, professor and scholar. Her research explores the politics of knowledge, colonialism, human rights and healing.  By placing community health in the context of race, class, gender and identity issues, Dr. Million shares perspectives on Native family life that will enhance cultural competency, challenge assumptions, and illuminate the connections among social and political conditions.  Her insights into the tensions between Native sovereignty and American governing practices are relevant to lawyers and law students working with tribes, government policy, family or criminal law, as well as anyone who is interested in a more complex and honest view of U.S. history.

Please RSVP to gatespsl@uw.edu by 12 noon on Monday, April 21 if you’d like lunch.

April 23: Webinar on Using Human Rights to Advance Racial Justice: An Introduction to the Race Treaty

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Wednesday, Apr. 23, 2014
2:00 – 3:30 PM EDT

Join the U.S. Human Rights Network’s CERD Taskforce for an introductory webinar on the “Race Treaty,” also known as the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (CERD), and the upcoming review of the U.S. Government by the U.N. CERD Committee (PRRAC is a member of the USHRN CERD Task Force).  The webinar is scheduled for Wednesday, April 23, 2014, 2:00-3:30 pm EDT.

Click here to register.

April 23: An Evening with Rwanda: “Finding Hillywood” Film Screening & More

Finding Hillywood Poster

Wednesday, Apr. 23, 2014
6:30 – 9:00 PM
Ethnic Cultural Center Theater (3940 Brooklyn Ave NE)
Admission: Free

Join us for an inspiring and informative film event and discussion to explore Rwanda’s history of transitional justice and healing since the 1994 genocide.

The program includes:

Transitional Justice in Rwanda: A short film by Rwandan youth about transitional justice in Rwanda, and a few video clips from interviews with personnel from the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. (www.tribunalvoices.org)

Finding Hillywood: A one-hour feature documentary about the beginning of Rwanda’s film industry, and a real life example of how art heals. (http://findinghillywood.com)

Discussion: A conversation with Leah Warshawski, Director of Finding Hillywood

For more information, click here.

April 24: Webinar on Next Steps in Bringing Home the Human Right to Housing: Scholarship from the Symposium on the Human Right to Housing

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Webinar 12:00 – 1:00 PST

To celebrate the release of a special edition of the Columbia Law School Human Rights Law Review with articles curated for last April’s Bringing Economic & Social Rights Home: The Right to Adequate Housing in the U.S. symposium, the National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty, the Columbia Law School Human Rights Institute, the Columbia Law School Human Rights Law Review, and the Northeastern University School of Law Program on Human Rights and the Global Economy will be hosting a webinar on April 24, 2014, at 3pm Eastern, 2pm Central, 1 Mountain, 12 noon Pacific.  

The articles in this special issue of the Human Rights Law Review provide an important complement to, and expansion of, the last year’s symposium discussion, and the webinar will offer a chance to hear the authors summarize their contributions and answer questions. 

Speakers include: 

  • Maria Foscarinis, Executive Director, National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty, NLCHP
  • Eric Tars, Director of Human Rights & Children’s Rights Programs, NLCHP
  • Heather Maria Johnson, Staff Attorney, ACLU of Southern California
  • Tristia Bauman, Senior Counsel, NLCHP
  • Risa Kaufman, Executive Director, Human Rights Institute, Columbia Law School
  • Heidi Wegleitner Staff Attorney, Legal Aid of Wisconsin; District 2 Supervisor, Dane County Board of Supervisors
  • Lucy Williams, Professor of Law & Faculty Co-Director, Program on Human Rights and the Global Economy, Northeastern Law School
  • Brittany Scott, Campaign Coordinator, National Economic & Social Rights Initiative

Come and get a taste of the new thoughts, and ask questions of the authors!  Click here to register.

April 25: Washington State Society of Healthcare Attorneys Presents Its Annual Hospital & Health Seminar

(c) University of Kansas - Medical Legal Partnership

Friday, Apr. 25, 2014
Seattle University School of Law, Sullivan Hall

The Washington State Society of Healthcare Attorneys (“WSSHA”) was founded in 1973. It is operated exclusively for educational and charitable purposes, to provide an opportunity for legal advisors in the health field to meet and exchange information and ideas, to conduct legal seminars of interest to such attorneys, and to provide a central agency for the exchange of information of a legal nature in the health field.

This is a great networking and learning opportunity.  The registration fee for students is $115.  If you want to attend, you should send in your check as soon as possible along with the form that you can print off of the website. This seminar is well attended by the healthcare attorneys of Seattle and a few from Spokane and Oregon so it’s a great chance to connect with attorneys who practice in the health law field.

Click here to view the brochure.  The registration form is on the brochure itself.

April 28: National Commission on Voting Rights Event at the UW Law School

Nat'l Commission on Voting Rights

Monday, Apr. 28, 2014
4:30 – 7:30 PM, RM 138

In 2005, the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, on behalf of the civil rights community, convened and staffed the National Commission on the Voting Rights Act (NCVRA), an eight-member blue ribbon panel which produced a fact-based report: Protecting Minority Voters: the Voting Rights Act at Work 1982 – 2005.

The Lawyers’ Committee, in close collaboration with state and local organizations, will organize the 2013-14 hearings.  The Commission will conduct fact finding hearings across the country that will look closely at the record of discrimination, election administration problems, voter registration procedures, and other challenges that voters are facing.

The Lawyers’ Committee will reach out to our partners in each of the states to work with the Commission in organizing the hearings. In addition to National Commissioners, we will invite local leaders to serve as guest commissioners. Voting attorneys, grassroots leaders, social scientists, and the public will be invited to testify. The hearing will be organized with Commissioners as questioners and panels of witnesses providing testimony. Each witness will be asked to submit a written statement (with the length at the discretion of each witness) in advance of the hearing.  During the hearing, witnesses will give oral testimony based on their written statement.  Commissioners sitting on the panel will ask questions on specific issues relating to each witnesses oral and written testimony. The hearings will also include periodic open sessions for audience members and voters to speak about their voting experience. Hearings will be held from November 2013 to spring 2014.

RSVP online here.

April 30: Dr. Bernard LaFayette “Sit-ins, Freedom Rides, and Selma: What the Civil Rights Movement and Nonviolence Tell Us Today

Dr. Lafayette & MLK

Wednesday, Apr. 30, 2014
10:00 AM
School of Social Work Building, 4101 15th Ave. NE, RM 305

In 1958, 18-year-old Bernard LaFayette enrolled at American Baptist Theological Seminary in Nashville, Tennessee. LaFayette is an African American and had lived in Florida and Pennsylvania: in the former, he was raised with segregation, in the latter, he attended integrated public schools. When he arrived at seminary, he roomed with John Lewis, now the U.S. Representative for Georgia’s 5th congressional district. Within weeks, Lewis convinced LaFayette to dive into the practice of nonviolence, and they would go on to participate in some of the most crucial moments in the U.S. Civil Rights Movement.

In this talk, Dr. LaFayette, having earned his Ph.D. from Harvard University, will speak about his experiences in the Civil Rights Movement, the theory and practice of nonviolence, and our responsibilities today — all with a boundless optimism and perhaps a song or two.

For more information, click here.

May 10: Presentation on Race & Jury Service: Is Jury Selection Fair?  Are All Communities Represented?

Franklin County Voter Registration Map

Saturday, May 10, 2014
4:30 PM, Gates Hall RM 119

Co-sponsors: Northwest Justice Project, Whitman College, Center for Public Service Law-UW Law

Interested in the issue of minority jury representation?

On Saturday May 10th, at 4:30 pm at the University of Washington Law School, students from Whitman College’s State of the State of Latinos in Washington will be presenting their project analyzing the jury selection system in Eastern Washington. In addition, attorneys from Washington Appleseed and the Northwest Justice Project will present the work they are doing to better understand jury selection and the role that academic researchers, attorneys, and students can play in increasing minority jury participation. The location will be in Room 119 in Gates Hall, light snacks and refreshments will be provided. Please feel free to contact David Morales at the Northwest Justice Project, if you have any further questions.