A Play at UW Law? Check Out Thurgood Marshall and Socrates Duking it Out!

October 2 & 3: “The Test Case” Play on Thurgood Marshall and Socrates Duking it Out – Is There Implicit Bias in Heaven?

Play Masks

Date: Friday, Oct. 2, 2015; Saturday, Oct. 3, 2015
Time: 7:30 PM
Location: University of Washington School of Law

A new play by a Seattle lawyer gets a staged reading by lawyers, under the wing of the Hit and Run Theater Company, directed by Arne Zaslove.

It has often been observed that good courtroom lawyers are actors at heart. And there is a natural kinship between the courtroom and the theater: both are places where we gather to experience persuasive speech and the pursuit of truth.

“The Test Case,” a new play by longtime civil rights attorney Jim Lobsenz, is about to bring lawyers and theater together to examine the question: Is Heaven an egalitarian and inclusive place – or do the entrance requirements reflect implicit bias? A staged reading will be presented in the Mock Trial Courtroom at the University of Washington Law School at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, October 2 and Saturday, October 3.

Seattle civil rights pioneer Lem Howell will play Thurgood Marshall, with appellate lawyer Michael B. King (of Carney Bradley Spellman) as Socrates, Venkat Balasubramani (of Focal PLLC) as Gandhi, and prominent trial and appellate litigator for farm workers (and others) John Phillips as Daniel Webster. The cast also features Susan Roe, of the U.S. Attorney’s office, third year UW Law Student and Gates Public Service Law Scholar Thomas Miller, as well as arts and culture professionals Jennifer Lobsenz (Program Director at Path with Art) and Edward Wolcher (Curator of Community Programs at Town Hall).

For tickets, click here. Photo credit: Udaipur Times.

October 5: Access to Information as a Human Right Conference

Conference Poster

Date: Monday, Oct. 5, 2015
Time: 12:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Location: University of Washington School of Law, William H. Gates Hall RM 115 (Sessions) & 138 (Evening Keynote)

This fall, the University of Washington Center for Human Rights will host a one-day conference, “Access to Information as a Human Right,” on October 5, 2015, at the UW School of Law. Grounded in the UW CHR’s partnerships with organizations and communities struggling for truth and accountability in post-war El Salvador, the conference will explore the right to access to information as a frontline of transnational campaigns for justice. Preceding the conference, the UW CHR will announce exciting advances in the Freedom of Information Act program of its Unfinished Sentences project in a press availability at the UW School of Law.

For more information and to register online, click here.

Have an Interest in Pursuing a Career in Elder Law? The UW Retirement Association Seeks Applicants for $4,000 Scholarship

Are a you a UW Law student? Have an Interest in Pursuing a Career in Elder Law? The UW Retirement Association Seeks Applicants for $4,000 Scholarship! Applications Due Feb. 3

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Each year, UWRA awards scholarships to UW undergraduate, graduate and professional students who are preparing for careers related to aging. Students from a wide variety of disciplines have received these scholarships, which are awarded in Spring quarter each year. UWRA has also endowed a Graduate Fellowship in Aging that is awarded each year by the Graduate School. Learn about the Graduate Fellowship here. Each year’s Scholarship and Fellowship recipients join with UWRA members for a scholarship celebration in the spring.

For more information, click here.

Want to Join the Fight to End the Criminalization of Homelessness?  National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty releases report on, Human Rights to Human Reality

NLCHP

A 10 Step Guide to Strategic Human Rights Advocacy

Working consistently for the past two decades, the Law Center is achieving unprecedented success in getting federal agencies to address the criminalization of homelessness as a human rights violation. This guide presents ten steps as a case study of our experiences that we believe can help others achieve broader respect for, and implementation of, human rights.

Click here to access the report.

Interested in Exploring Global Health Law and Policy Issues? Join the Legal and Policy Solutions to Improve the Global Health of Women, Children & Adolescents Lecture Series

Global WACh Logo

If you are interested in exploring global health law and policy issues from a multidisciplinary perspective, please join us for Legal and Policy Solutions to Improve the Global Health of Women, Children & Adolescents, a lecture series and course that meets Tuesdays from 5:30 – 7 pm Winter Quarter.

Each Tuesday, we invite three expert practitioners –one from medicine/public health/health science, one from law/policy, and one from a community organization/NGO –  to discuss health topics that impact women, children and adolescents in the US and around the world.  We have some amazing speakers lined up so far, ranging from a pediatrician from Kenya who works to prevent mother-child HIV transmission to a Seattle City Councilwoman who has led advocacy for a paid parental leave ordinance.

Feel free to attend any session.  The series is also open to all UW students and the public, so you can attend any session that is of interest without enrolling for course credit.

Enrollment/grading.  You can also enroll to receive one course credit for attending the speaker series (LAW H518 A/B) or two credits for attending both the speaker series and a small discussion group that meets beforehand from 4:20 – 5:20 pm (LAW H518 C/D, meeting in Room 115).  Both sections will be graded on a credit/no credit basis.  Students of the speaker series (LAW H518 A/B) receive credit for attending the lectures – readings are optional.  Students of the discussion group (LAW H518 C/D) receive credit for reading the assigned articles and participating in the discussion.

Course organizers:  Jennifer Lenga-Long, JD; Tanya Karwaki, JD, LLM; Brandi Shah MD, MPH; and Jennifer Slyker, PhD

Click here for the scheduled topics.

Celebrate Human Rights Day by Learning More about Homelessness Online!

December 10: How to Make Human & Civil Rights Real – Homelessness and Beyond Webinar

national law center housing

Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014
2:00 – 3:00 PM EST / 10:00 -11:00 AM PST

On Human Rights Day, Wednesday, December 10, the National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty will host a free webinar discussing the criminalization of homelessness as a violation of civil and human rights, and strategies advocates can use to work toward solutions.

The webinar will discuss three forthcoming reports from the Law Center, including:

The webinar will include updates on recent human rights advocacy to address the criminalization of homelessness, methods that individual advocates can employ in their work, and the important role the federal government has in combating criminalization.

To register for the webinar, click here.

January 13: A Panel Discussion on Compensated Surrogacy

WLR Logo

Tuesday, Jan. 13, 2014
6:00 PM
William H. Gates Hall, RM 138

Please join Washington Law Review on Tuesday, January 13, 2015 at 6:00 pm for a panel discussion on Compensated Surrogacy, the subject of our December 2014 symposium issue.

Compensated surrogacy is an arrangement in which a woman carries and gives birth to a child in exchange for money. Such an arrangement affects many parties—the child born, the surrogate, the parents who wish to raise the child, the donors of genetic material, and others. But in the United States, surrogacy remains a largely unregulated area. The December 2014 issue of Washington Law Review is dedicated to scholarship addressing compensated surrogacy and the legal and political implications for groups affected.

THE PANEL INCLUDES:

Peter Nicolas is the Jeffrey & Susan Brotman Endowed Professor of Law at the University of
Washington School of Law. His article, “Straddling the Columbia” discusses his own experiences  as an intended parent of a surrogacy arrangement, before ultimately concluding that surrogacy arrangements merit constitutional protection.

Terry Price is the Associate Director of the Center for Law in Science and Global Health at the
University of Washington School of Law. His article, “The Future of Compensated Surrogacy
in Washington State: Anytime Soon?” discusses the legislative history of attempts to regulate
compensated surrogacy in Washington State.

Sara Ainsworth is the Director of Legal Advocacy at the National Advocates for Pregnant Women. Her article, “Bearing Children, Bearing Risks” approaches the topic of compensated surrogacy from a feminist perspective, with the goal of drawing more feminist voices into this ongoing discussion.

This panel will be moderated by Kellye Testy, Dean of the University of Washington School of Law.

Click here to RSVP.

January 20: Attorney General 8th Annual Open House

WA AGO seal

Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2014
3:30 – 5:30 PM
800 5th Ave., Suite 2000, Seattle, WA (Bank of America, Fifth Avenue Plaza Bldg.)

The Attorney General’s Office (AGO) serves more than 230 state agencies, boards, commissions, colleges and universities, as well as the Legislature and the Governor. The mission of the Office is to deliver the highest quality professional legal services to officials, agencies and citizens of the state of Washington. The Office is comprised of over 500 attorneys and 600 professional staff.

Assistant Attorneys General from many of the AGO’s divisions will be in attendance to speak about opportunities that exist within their divisions and the AGO. Information about the Office’s volunteer law clerk recruitment program for first and second year law students will also be available.

Celebrate Human Rights Day by Learning How to Make Human & Civil Rights Real in the US

November 22: St. Jude Give Thanks Walk

St. Jude Logo

Saturday, Nov. 22, 2014
8:30 AM
Fisher Pavilion Rooftop, 305 Harrison St, Seattle, WA 98109

FREE Registration

Walkers from more than 65 communities nationwide, including The Pacific Northwest, are stepping out to support kids battling cancer and other deadly diseases at this year’s St. Jude Give thanks. Walk.™, benefiting St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital®.

The 5K walk begins at 8:30 a.m. on Saturday, Nov. 22, at The Seattle Center. The family friendly event will feature children’s activities, and fun for the whole family. Registration is free, as participants are encouraged to form teams and raise funds to help ensure families never pay St. Jude for anything.

In addition to supporting the lifesaving mission of St. Jude, participants can receive incentives at the $35, $100 and $250 levels to help make great strides in achieving their fundraising goals. Prizes include a St. Jude Give thanks. Walk. t-shirt, tumbler and tote bag.

For more information, click here.

November 24: Global Mondays – Study Abroad Opportunities

“Where Can Your Legal Education Take You?”

global mondays

Monday, Nov. 24, 2014
12:30 – 1:20 PM
William H. Gates Hall, RM 117
Lunch Served

UW law students have many opportunities to study law in foreign countries during their studies, in preparation for a legal career in an increasingly globalized society. A panel of faculty members will introduce various summer- and quarter-based options available through the Law School and UW, and some key considerations. Confirmed faculty include Dean Hotchkiss, Dean Hicks, Professor Takenaka and Professor Spitzer.

December 10: Free Human Rights Webinar – How to Make Human & Civil Rights Real: Homelessness and Beyond

Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014national law center housing
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PST
Online

On Human Rights Day, Wednesday, December 10, the National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty will host a free webinar discussing the criminalization of homelessness as a violation of civil and human rights, and strategies advocates can use to work toward solutions. Discussion will also include updates on recent human rights advocacy to address criminalization, and the important role the federal government has in combating criminalization.

The webinar will also discuss three forthcoming reports from the Law Center, including:
No Safe Place: Advocacy Manual (available December 3)
2014 Human Right to Housing Report Card (Available December 10)
Human Rights Advocacy Guide (available December 10)

Your email will be added to our mailing list, and when new resources, reports, and webinars become available you will be the first to know. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Register online here.

January 16: Save the Date! KCBA Annual Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Luncheon

KCBA MLK Jr Luncheon

Friday, Jan. 16, 2015
11:30 AM, Registration Opens
12:00 PM – 1:15 PM, Program
Seattle Sheraton Hotel, 1400 Sixth Avenue, Seattle

Tickets
$50.00 General Admission
$500.00 for a table of 10
Students & Law Clerks, $25.00.  To register at the $25.00 price point, please call the KCBA CLE & Events Department at: 206.267.7008.

Prefer to pay by check – easy as 1 2 3

  1. Register by clicking on this link:  MLK 2015 Luncheon
  2. Click on the tickets link, select the “register and be invoiced” option, and then follow the prompts
  3. You will receive an invoice via email

To register for the luncheon, click here.

Keynote Speaker:  Sherrilyn Ifill, President and Director-Counsel for NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc.

Sherrilyn Ifill is the seventh President and Director-Counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc. Ms. Ifill is a long-time member of the LDF family. After graduating law school, Ifill served first as a fellow at the American Civil Liberties Union and then for five years as an assistant counsel in LDF’s New York office, where she litigated voting rights cases.  Among her successful litigation was the landmark Voting Rights Act case Houston Lawyers’ Association vs. Attorney General of Texas, in which the Supreme Court held that judicial elections are covered by the provisions of section 2 of the Voting Rights Act.

Are You Interested in Defending Human Rights? Internship Opportunities Available

Disability Rights Washington Hiring Civil Rights Attorney, Due TODAY

Disability Rights Washington

Disability Rights Washington (DRW) seeks two attorneys to advocate for people with mental illness in jails located in King County.  DRW is looking for one attorney with 3+ years experience and one entry-level attorney. 

Each attorney will spend a significant portion of his or her time monitoring one or two jails located in King County and educating inmates about their legal rights and self-advocacy strategies.  The attorney will also respond to allegations of abuse and neglect, develop and disseminate information and referral resources, and investigate systemic legal violations.  Each position will likely involve negotiation and collaboration with assigned jail(s), and may involve litigation.

For complete details, click here.

Brooklyn Defender Services Seeking Attorney to Work in Civil Justice Project’s Education Advocacy Unit, Due 10/30

Brooklyn Defender Services Logo

Brooklyn Defender Services (BDS) is one of the largest public defense providers in the United States. We represent more than 43,000 clients per year in a variety of legal proceedings in New York City, primarily indigent criminal, family, and immigration defense. BDS represents clients who have diverse, complex and multi-faceted needs in a high volume and very fast-pacedsetting.

BDS’ Education Unit advocates for the educational rights of BDS’ clients in formal proceedings against the Department of Education, as well as informally and in collaboration with school officials. Frequently, the young clients BDS serves in family and criminal proceedings are “overage and under-credited,” and confronting obstacles to completing their education including, among other factors, special education needs, school suspensions, difficulty accessing alternative education options, and disruptions in education due to foster care placement, incarceration and homelessness.  We work with our young clients and their families to identify their educational goals and then provide the necessary representation and advocacy to remove the identified obstacles.

BDS has an immediate opening for an Education Staff Attorney to provide legal representation and informal advocacy to address the education needs of our criminal, family, and immigration defense clients.

For complete details, click here.

Department of Justice Offices Boards and Divisions Seeking Trial Attorney, Due 10/30

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The Civil Rights Division (Division) of the Department of Justice, created by the enactment of the Civil Rights Act of 1957, works to uphold the civil and constitutional rights of all Americans, particularly some of the most vulnerable members of our society.

The Employment Litigation Section (ELS) enforces federal statutes and an executive order that prohibit employment discrimination. These statutes include Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, 42 U.S.C. 2000e, which ELS enforces as to state and local government employers, and the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act of 1994, 38 U.S.C. 4312, which ELS enforces as to private, state and local government employers.

For complete details, click here.

Kendall Fellowship in Environmental Justice and Climate Policy, Due 10/31

UCS Logo

The Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS), the leading science-based organization at the center of today’s most exciting and important policy debates, seeks outstanding candidates for the Kendall Science Fellows program. This up to two-year fellowship is open to candidates who will have completed their Ph.D. by spring 2015. The fellow will work with staff in both the Center for Science and Democracy and the Climate and Energy Program at UCS, and with external partners from environmental justice (EJ) organizations, to study costs and benefits of emissions reduction strategies to combat climate change.  The fellow will contribute to formulating research questions, investigating, presenting, and making policy and other recommendations to strengthen connections and bridge gaps between the mainstream environmental movement and environmental justice movement. This fellowship will also have an impact on UCS’s broader environmental justice and equity priorities.

For complete details, click here.

ACLU of Washington Seeking Temporary Legislative Session Aide, Due Before 11/1

ACLU of WA

The ACLU of Washington is a non-profit public interest organization devoted to protecting civil rights and civil liberties. The Legislative Session Aide is part of the Policy Advocacy Group, which consists of legislative, field and policy staff who advance the ACLU-WA’s priorities at the state and local level and strategically involve ACLU-WA supporters in that effort.

The Legislative Session Aide will support the Legislative Director during the 2015 state legislative session in Olympia.  The Legislative Director is primarily in Olympia during the session and relies on the Session Aide, who works in our Seattle office, for managing scheduling, bill analysis and tracking, and other important support work.  The Session Aide also works within a closely coordinated four-person team consisting of the Legislative Director, Legislative Associate (who primarily lobbies in Olympia along with the Legislative Director) and Policy Advocacy Group Assistant (based in Seattle).  This is a full-time, temporary position which begins as soon as possible in November, and continues through the conclusion of the 2015 legislative session, currently slated for late April.

For complete details, click here.

Human Rights First Seeking Anti-Trafficking Campaign Legal Intern, Due 11/14

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The Anti-Trafficking Campaign Legal Intern will support Human Rights First’s work researching the legal framework of human trafficking, particularly in the areas of criminal, labor, and international law. The Intern will work closely with team members to advance program goals and strategic objectives. The start date for this position January 20,2015. It may be either a part or full time position and will run through May 2015.

Please apply through Careers Human Rights.

For complete details, click here.

Attention 2Ls, 3Ls, and LLMs! Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR) Seeking International Human Rights Intern, Due 11/14

CCR Logo

The Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR) seeks experienced second or third-year law students or LLM students with a strong commitment to social justice to provide legal research and analysis as part of a semester-long unpaid internship opportunity. CCR is a national not-for-profit legal, educational, and advocacy organization dedicated to advancing and protecting the rights guaranteed by the United States Constitution and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Interns will have the opportunity to work with CCR attorneys on a range of projects, particularly related to corporate accountability, torture, detention, suppression of dissent, and anti-militarism and violations under the Alien Tort Statute, the Torture Victim Protection Act, and universal jurisdiction.  The intern will spend 10-20 hours per week between January and May 2015 assisting attorneys on projects. This position is also open to students seeking full-time semester-long externships.

For complete details, click here.

Columbia Legal Services Seeking Staff Attorney for Its Institutions Project, Requires 3+ Years Litigation Experience

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The Institutions Project (IP) is seeking a full-time attorney with a minimum of three years of litigation experience. IP is an advocacy team consisting of five attorneys, a paralegal, and two legal assistants. IP engages in systemic advocacy for individuals and groups, in collaboration with other programs and the private bar, on behalf of people in facilities for the developmentally disabled, psychiatric hospitals, and adult and juvenile state and local correctional facilities throughout Washington. IP systemic advocacy has focused on cases that have a broad impact on solving the most critical issues of clients in institutions, including class actions, legislative representation and other policy advocacy on behalf of clients.

For complete details, click here.

King County Superior Court Seeking On-Call Bailiffs, Paid Position

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Temporary, at-will employee who is employed at the pleasure of the hiring authority, King County Superior Court. The position is short term in duration, 910 hours or less in a calendar year. Work is sporadic and not guaranteed. Employee will cover in court for absent bailiffs when they are on leave.

Duties: Assist the assigned judge, act as a liaison between the court and other agencies, jurisdictions, jurors observers, court staff visitors and the general public. Handle sensitive, confidential and potentially volatile situations. Maintain database of case management. Ensures confidential and direct support to facilitate the operation of the Court.

Skills required: Ability to work in high pressure environment in a calm, professional manner. Ability to maintain confidential information on matters before the court. Skill in organizational techniques including prioritizing multiple tasks while adapting to frequent and sudden changes in workload demand. Must be able to work both independently and as a member of a team.

Rate of pay is $27.61 per hour, with 40 hours of paid training provided prior to assignments. This on-call position is not benefits eligible.

There are two positions that are open immediately. Please email Heiti Milnor-Lewis and/or Sandra Ogilvie with a resume.

Children’s Law Center of California Seeking Contract Attorney in Dependency Law

Children's Law Center of California Logo

Children’s Law Center of California (CLC) represents children who have been abused, neglected, or abandoned that come under the protection of either the Los Angeles or Sacramento County Juvenile Dependency Court systems. Children’s Law Center was created by the Superior Court in 1990 to serve as appointed counsel for these Los Angeles youth. In July of 2011 we opened our doors in Sacramento County and now serve as appointed counsel for all abused and neglected children in both Los Angeles and Sacramento counties.

CLC seeks to hire a contract attorney in dependency law.

For complete details, click here.

Interested in Working for the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights? Applications Open Now for 2015 Fellowship!

National Immigration Forum Seeking Policy and Advocacy Intern in Washington DC

National Immigration Forum Logo

We are hiring interns to assist us with research, analysis, drafting of written materials, and monitoring activities of the executive and legislative branches of government on immigration issues. The National Immigration Forum advocates for the value of immigrants and immigration to the nation.  For over 30 years, the Forum has worked to advance sound federal immigration solutions through its policy expertise, communications outreach and coalition building work, which forges powerful alliances of diverse constituencies across the country to build consensus on the important role of immigrants in America.

For a complete job description and application details, click here.

Inter-American Commission on Human Rights Offering 2015 Romulo Gallegos Fellowship, Due 10/29

The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights is pleased to inform about the launching of a new automatized system to apply for fellowships, which as of today is the only means of presenting applications. The goal of this new digital system is to facilitate and streamline processes, to the benefit of all involved parties.

The Commission appreciates the cooperation and support of all users in the current process of modernization and digitalization of our systems.

For more information about the fellowship, click here.  Deadline 10/29.

Poverty & Race Research Action Council Seeking 2014-2015 Housing Fellow, Due 10/31

PRRAC

At the present time, PRRAC’s work is focused in the areas of housing, education, environmental justice, and domestic human rights, with a particular emphasis on the continuing consequences of historical patterns of housing segregation and development.

In addition to national-level law and policy research and advocacy, we are engaged in local technical assistance work in Baltimore and Hartford, in support of regional desegregation cases filed by the NAACP Legal Defense Fund and the ACLU. PRRAC is also working to support the development of a regional housing mobility program in the Philadelphia area.

The incoming Fellow will focus on our housing, community development, and environmental justice portfolios. The position is based in Washington, D.C. , and the fellowship term will run through summer 2015 (beginning and end dates negotiable).

For a complete job description and application instructions, click here.

Environmental Law Foundation Seeking Summer 2015 Legal Intern in Oakland, CA

ELF Logo

ELF is looking for one or more legal interns to work on a full-time basis during the summer of 2015. We highly value interns’ contributions and we are looking for someone who is ready to produce legal work at a high level.

ELF’s legal interns will assist in all aspects of litigation on our docket. Generally, the interns will be conducting legal research and drafting memos, briefs, discovery and/or pleadings. To the extent feasible, the interns will also attend hearings and settlement meetings. The interns will work closely with a staff attorney who will supervise their work and provide feedback. Because of our small size and fast-paced environment, interns will be heavily involved in all aspects of our work, from strategy meetings to brief writing. We are proud that we can offer interns the opportunity to do real, substantive, important work.

For a complete job description and application details, click here.

Attention Rising 2Ls and 3Ls! Spitzer Internship Program Now Accepting Applications

NHELP Logo

The National Health Law Program (NHeLP) is excited to accept applications for the Spitzer Summer Internship Program in honor of immediate past Executive Director Emily Spitzer. NHeLP seeks up to three law students to participate in the program, with the paid positions divided among offices in Washington, DC, Carrboro, NC, and Los Angeles, CA.

Potential Spitzer interns are rising 2L or 3L students, with a proven and demonstrated commitment to social justice and an interest in working toward the expansion and protection of health care access for low-income and underserved populations.

Spitzer interns will work closely with NHeLP staff attorneys, who work collaboratively across offices and engage in the primary work of the organization–providing high-quality advice and support to state-based health lawyers, administration officials, and policymakers.

For more information, click here.

Urban Justice Center Seeking Summer 2015 Legal Intern in Community Development Project, Due 1/9/15

UJC

The Community Development Project (CDP) of the Urban Justice Center (UJC) seeks law student interns who are interested in working with us during the Summer of 2015 to protect the rights of low-income individuals and provide legal, technical and research assistance to grassroots community organizations working on various social justice issues. The main types of substantive areas in which we work include:  housing; workers’ rights; consumer justice; and transactional legal services (e.g. legal help for community organizations and worker cooperatives). By providing legal support in these substantive areas, our mission is to advance community groups’ campaigns for social and economic justice.

For a complete job description and application details, click here.

Hadsell Stormer & Renick LLP Seeking Summer 2015 Law Clerk, Applications Accepted on Rolling Basis Through 1/30/15

Hadsell Stormer and Renick LLP Logo

Hadsell Stormer & Renick LLP is currently accepting applications for law clerk positions in Summer 2015.

Job duties will entail researching and drafting legal memoranda and briefs, participating in meetings with clients and attorneys, developing prospective cases, and attending depositions, hearings, and mediations.

The ideal candidate will possess a demonstrated commitment to work in public interest law, have strong research and writing skills, and will be in their second year of law school.

For a complete job description and application details, click here.

 

Columbia Law School Releases New Practice Guide Addressing Gender-Based Violence

New Resource on Human Rights Approach to Gender-Based Violence in the United States

Columbia Law School Logo

By: JoAnn Kamuf, Bringing Human Rights Home

A new resource developed by the Columbia Law School Human Rights Institute, the ACLU Women’s Rights Project and the University of Miami International Human Rights Clinic is now available.

Domestic Violence & Sexual Assault in the U.S.:  A Human Rights Based Approach & Practice Guide includes core human rights principles related to gender-based violence, as well as relevant treaties, case-law, related reports and organizational resources.   It also discusses recent developments in U.S. policy and the value added of human rights in the U.S. domestic context.  It can be accessed through this link or on our publications page.

This resource is an outgrowth of a DOJ-DOS sponsored roundtable held in April of this year and reflects the input of a number of network members and U.S. government representatives.  Building on conversations that took place at the roundtable, the Practice Guide offers concrete ideas for incorporating human rights into federal policy and practice.

What’s at Stake for Hong Kong?

Hong Kong Protests

By: Scott Neuman, National Public Radio (NRP)

Masses of pro-democracy protesters continue to pack the streets in Hong Kong, defying police who have responded with tear gas. The demonstrators are angry that Beijing has insisted on vetting all candidates for the territory’s next chief executive.

Here’s a closer look at the issue and what’s at stake:

What Was In The Handover Agreement?

Hong Kong was designated a “special administrative region” within China and promised a “high degree of autonomy,” including the eventual election of its chief executive. Hong Kong people retained their own passports, making it easier for them to travel abroad than it was for their mainland counterparts. The territory has also retained the Hong Kong dollar as its currency and issues its own postage stamps, though Queen Elizabeth’s image no longer appears on either.

“The central government will not interfere,” Lu told People’s Daily, according to The Wall Street Journal. China touted its relationship with Hong Kong as “one country, two systems.”

Although Hong Kong’s first several chief executives were selected by a committee appointed by Beijing, China promised that the election of the territory’s leader would eventually be democratic.

Continue reading here.  Photo credit Carlos Barria (Reuters/Landov).

UN Climate Summit 2014 Yields Mass Public Mobilization, Political Commitments as Participants Hope to Lay Groundwork for Global Climate Change Treaty

UN Photo Climate Summit

By: International Justice Resource Center

The much anticipated one-day Climate Summit 2014 took place this Tuesday, September 23 at the United Nations (UN) headquarters in New York, marking the international community’s latest effort to address climate change. Hosted by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, Climate Summit 2014 aimed to engage world leaders and encourage international action to slow climate change. Governments at the Summit were expected to produce “concrete initiatives” and discuss ways to lower industrial emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, and other gases that contribute to the heating of the planet.  The primary purpose of Climate Summit 2014 is to generate momentum for a global agreement on climate change in 2015.

Continue reading here.  Photo credit: Mark Garten/UN Photo

Update: Public & Private Solutions to Providing Legal Aid for Unaccompanied Minors

Statute - justice for all

By: ABA Access to Justice Blog

In early August “U.S. Vice President Joe Biden made an impassioned plea to U.S. law firms…to free up attorneys to help deal with the surge of Central American children who have entered the country illegally by providing more pro bono representation…  Biden urged lawyers to step up and help deal with a backlog of court cases.”

Since then, government (on all levels), law firms, and other private-sector actors are reacting to the glut of unaccompanied minors who are being processed through the U.S.’s byzantine immigration system without legal counsel.  Here’s the underlying problem as reported by the Press Democrat:

Border patrol agents picked up more than 66,000 unaccompanied children, most of them from El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras, along the southern U.S. border between Oct. 1, 2013, and the end of last month. They were turned over to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, then underwent medical checks and were given immunizations before being placed in shelters or with relatives and sponsors.

Those shelters and other living accommodations are scattered throughout the U.S. So the question has arisen about how to ensure that unaccompanied minors have access too legal services.

Continue reading here.