Have an Interest in Pursuing a Career in Elder Law? The UW Retirement Association Seeks Applicants for $4,000 Scholarship

Are a you a UW Law student? Have an Interest in Pursuing a Career in Elder Law? The UW Retirement Association Seeks Applicants for $4,000 Scholarship! Applications Due Feb. 3

cropped-cpsl-logo1.jpg

Each year, UWRA awards scholarships to UW undergraduate, graduate and professional students who are preparing for careers related to aging. Students from a wide variety of disciplines have received these scholarships, which are awarded in Spring quarter each year. UWRA has also endowed a Graduate Fellowship in Aging that is awarded each year by the Graduate School. Learn about the Graduate Fellowship here. Each year’s Scholarship and Fellowship recipients join with UWRA members for a scholarship celebration in the spring.

For more information, click here.

Want to Join the Fight to End the Criminalization of Homelessness?  National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty releases report on, Human Rights to Human Reality

NLCHP

A 10 Step Guide to Strategic Human Rights Advocacy

Working consistently for the past two decades, the Law Center is achieving unprecedented success in getting federal agencies to address the criminalization of homelessness as a human rights violation. This guide presents ten steps as a case study of our experiences that we believe can help others achieve broader respect for, and implementation of, human rights.

Click here to access the report.

Interested in Exploring Global Health Law and Policy Issues? Join the Legal and Policy Solutions to Improve the Global Health of Women, Children & Adolescents Lecture Series

Global WACh Logo

If you are interested in exploring global health law and policy issues from a multidisciplinary perspective, please join us for Legal and Policy Solutions to Improve the Global Health of Women, Children & Adolescents, a lecture series and course that meets Tuesdays from 5:30 – 7 pm Winter Quarter.

Each Tuesday, we invite three expert practitioners –one from medicine/public health/health science, one from law/policy, and one from a community organization/NGO –  to discuss health topics that impact women, children and adolescents in the US and around the world.  We have some amazing speakers lined up so far, ranging from a pediatrician from Kenya who works to prevent mother-child HIV transmission to a Seattle City Councilwoman who has led advocacy for a paid parental leave ordinance.

Feel free to attend any session.  The series is also open to all UW students and the public, so you can attend any session that is of interest without enrolling for course credit.

Enrollment/grading.  You can also enroll to receive one course credit for attending the speaker series (LAW H518 A/B) or two credits for attending both the speaker series and a small discussion group that meets beforehand from 4:20 – 5:20 pm (LAW H518 C/D, meeting in Room 115).  Both sections will be graded on a credit/no credit basis.  Students of the speaker series (LAW H518 A/B) receive credit for attending the lectures – readings are optional.  Students of the discussion group (LAW H518 C/D) receive credit for reading the assigned articles and participating in the discussion.

Course organizers:  Jennifer Lenga-Long, JD; Tanya Karwaki, JD, LLM; Brandi Shah MD, MPH; and Jennifer Slyker, PhD

Click here for the scheduled topics.

Don’t Miss It! Career Workshops, Advocacy Camp and Free Webinars

July 16: Summer Career Workshop Series- Strategic Resumes

resume12:30-1:20pm in room 117

Are you around Gates Hall this summer? Join us for part four of our six part series where we cover the nuts and bolts of strategic career planning. On July 16th we’ll cover strategic resumes. We’ll also have lunch! So please RSVP in Symplicity!

July 17: Free Webinar on the Criminalization of Homelessness in US Cities

CrimHomless

Photo courtesy: Photo by Flickr user irodman (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

On Thursday, July 17, the National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty will host a free webinar discussing findings from its forthcoming report, No Safe Place: The Criminalization of Homelessness in U.S. Cities.

Homelessness continues to be a national crisis, affecting millions of people each year, including a rising number of families. Despite a lack of affordable housing and shelter space, many communities have chosen to criminally punish people living on the street for doing what any person must do to survive, such as sitting down or sleeping.

No Safe Place provides an overview of criminalization measures in effect across the nation, and looks at trends in the criminalization of homelessness, based on an analysis of the laws in 187 cities. The prevalence of these criminalization laws is rising, including dramatic increases in the number of city-wide bans, which effectively make it illegal for homeless people to perform fundamental, life-sustaining human activities throughout entire cities.

Key conclusions and recommendations the report will address include: 

– Criminalization laws violate the civil and human rights of homeless people

– A growing body of research shows that criminalization is the most expensive and least effective way to address homelessness

– Communities and local governments should replace criminalization laws with constructive solutions to ending homelessness

– The federal government should play a leadership role in combating the criminalization of homelessness

The webinar will include highlights of key statistical data on criminalization, constructive alternatives that some cities are using to address homelessness, and the important role the federal government has in combating criminalization. Presenters will include Maria Foscarinis and Tristia Bauman of the Law Center, and others.

To register for the webinar, click here. 

This webinar is a free service, but if you find this information useful, please consider making a donation to ensure we can continue to provide this critical training.

July 21: Free Webinar on Human Right to Counsel

Please register today for our human rights webinar on a right to counsel, which will be held on Tuesday July 22 from 12:30-1:30pm ET. The new section of our Human Rights in the U.S. Handbook for Legal Aid Attorneys on a Right to Counsel will be published on our website  and will be sent to all registered participants for the webinar via email on Monday July 21st.

right to counsel webinar

Sept 17-19: Register Today! Children’s Alliance Announces 2014 Advocacy Camp

Children's Alliance Logo

Advocacy changes kids’ lives, and it’s takes all of us to win the change that Washington’s kids and communities are counting on. You are invited to power up your advocacy skills at Children’s Alliance 3-day Advocacy Camp. Whether you are already speaking up to your legislators or just wondering how to get started, whether you do policy advocacy at work or in your volunteer time, Advocacy Camp is hands-on, interactive, training you can use to make a bigger, lasting, difference. You’ll have a chance to learn from experts, connect with people who are speaking up for kids around the state, and talk directly with members of the media and state legislators. Advocacy Camp 2014 will be September 17-19th at the Dumas Bay Conference Center in Federal Way, Washington. Tuition is $425 per person (discounted to $325 for organizational members of the Children’s Alliance).

Please do not let cost keep you from applying. Scholarships are available for those who need it, along with financial assistance for child care and transportation.

Please apply early, as Camp fills up quickly. Visit our website to learn more. You can apply online or download and print a paper application.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact Emijah Smith at 206.324.0340 x25 or emijah@childrensalliance.org.

Serve on NJP Board of Directors, Connect with Students About Your Summer Internship, Tips to Avoid Burnout & Criminalization of the Poor

Apply to Serve on the Northwest Justice Project’s Board of Directors

NJP_LogoApplication Deadline: Sept. 5, 2013. That’s tomorrow folks!

The Northwest Justice Project has an opening on its Board of Directors for three attorneys, for three-year terms starting Jan. 1, 2014. NJP is a statewide not-for-profit law firm providing free legal services to low-income people from 13 offices.

For more information about the position and how to apply, see the Volunteer Opportunities area of the WSBA website.

Just Finished your Summer Internship, Externship or Volunteer Experience? Want Other Students to Benefit and Learn from Your Experience? Got 3 minutes?

networkingIf you answered YES to all of these questions then be sure to add your contact info to our public service student experiences database so that other students can connect with you to learn about your internship, externship or volunteer experience! Click here to access the database and add your contact info.  Be ready to enter your UW NetID to access the database. Please note that this database is only available for current UW law students.

From Fired up to Burnt Out: 7 tips to help you sustain a life committed to social justice

Stone CirclesBy Lindsey Mullen, Reprinted by Idealist.org, photo credit stone circles at The Stone House

When she was an organizer in the 1990s, Claudia Horwitz began to notice that many of the people she worked with were overworked, exhausted, and stressed out. Responding to the urgent need she saw in the activist community, Claudia founded stone circles, an organization that works to strengthen and sustain people committed to transformation and justice.

Since 2007, stone circles has been based in Mebane, North Carolina at The Stone House, a retreat and training center on 70 acres of land. One of stone circles’ primary goals is to address high rates of burnout among activists and organizers.

Burnout is more than just a busy week at work—it’s the long-term result of carrying continual stress, exhaustion, anxiety, or isolation.

Here are some tips from stone circles for addressing burnout:

1. Develop a personal practice.

A practice is simply a habit that gives us energy and reminds us of what matters most. Having a practice helps us pay concentrated attention to the inner voice—a presence that has the power to continually re-inform the activities of our daily lives. Mindful breathing, yoga, meditation, prayer, and journal writing are all examples of personal practice. Choose a practice that replenishes you and commit to doing it daily for a month. This can help make it a habit. Conitinue reading here.

Civility 

alliance equal_justice_newsletter_header800px
by Tim Harris, Real Change Executive Director, Alliance for Equal Justice September Newsletter
A Pioneer Square business owner angrily compares homeless people in a nearby park to pigeons and demands in a public meeting that they be cleared away immediately.  Yakima considers new anti-panhandling legislation, and sheriffs in Snohomish County are ticketing freeway on-ramp beggars for pedestrian interference.
While all of this is recent, none of it is new.  Over the past two decades, as the numbers of homeless people have steadily risen, visible poverty has been criminalized across the United States, with a battery of legislation to prohibit sitting or lying on public sidewalks, camping on public property, overnight parking, panhandling, feeding people in public, and even the possession of a shopping cart or a blanket.
While these laws have added to the troubles that poor people face with fines, jail time, and criminal records that makes it harder to find housing and work, homelessness itself has continued to rise.
Recent budget cuts at both the state and federal levels have not helped.  Over the past four years, more than $20 million has been slashed from Washington state programs offering mental health and addiction treatment services to the very poor.
Once proposed, these laws, driven by fear and prejudice, almost always pass.  Seattle has provided a few recent exceptions, but these stand as a fragile hedge against the greater trend. Continue reading here.

Gender Justice in North Africa, Decriminalizing Homelessness & Combatting Source of Income Discrimination in Rental Housing

Underage Girls Are Egypt’s Summer Rentals

Underage-girls-IPS-571x472By Cam McGrath, Inter Press News Agency

El HAWAMDIA, Egypt , Aug 5 2013 (IPS) – Each summer, wealthy male tourists from Gulf Arab states flock to Egypt to escape the oppressive heat of the Arabian Peninsula, taking residence at upscale hotels and rented flats in Cairo and Alexandria. Many come with their families and housekeeping staff, spending their days by the pool, shopping, and frequenting cafes and nightclubs. Others come for a more sinister purpose.

In El Hawamdia, a poor agricultural town 20 kilometres south of Cairo, they are easy to spot. Arab men in crisp white thawbs troll the town’s pot-holed, garbage-strewn streets in their luxury cars and SUVs. As they arrive, Egyptian fixers in flip flops run alongside their vehicles, offering short-term flats and what to them is the town’s most sought-after commodity – underage girls.

Each year, in El Hawamdia and other impoverished rural communities across Egypt, thousands of girls between the ages of 11 and 18 are sold by their parents to wealthy, much older Gulf Arab men under the pretext of marriage. The sham nuptials may last from a couple of hours to years, depending on the negotiated arrangement.

“It’s a form of child prostitution in the guise of marriage,” Azza El-Ashmawy, director of the Child Anti-Trafficking Unit at the National Council for Childhood and Motherhood (NCCM) tells IPS. “The man pays a sum of money and will stay with the girl for a few days or the summer, or will take her back to his country for domestic work or prostitution.”

The girl is returned to her family when the marriage ends, usually to be married off again.

“Some girls have been married 60 times by the time they turn 18,” says El-Ashmawy. “Most ‘marriages’ last for just a couple of days or weeks.”

The deals are hatched in El Hawamdia’s myriad “marriage broker” offices, identifiable by the conspicuous presence of air-conditioners in a ramshackle town with intermittent power.

The brokers, usually second-rate lawyers, also offer a delivery service. Village girls as young as 11 are brought to the Arab tourists’ hotel or rented flat for selection. Arab men travelling with their wives and children often arrange a separate flat for such purposes.

The temporary marriages offer a way to circumvent Islamic restrictions on pre-marital sex. Continue reading here.

Moroccan Civil Society Organization Works to Implement Constitutional Gender-Parity Provisions

Morroccan Gender ParityIn May, Jossour Forum Des Femmes Marocaines, a Moroccan women’s rights organization and an ABA Rule of Law Initiative (ABA ROLI) partner, held a national colloquium in Rabat on the implementation of the 2011 constitution’s women’s rights-related provisions. Attended by 140 civil society representatives, parliamentarians, journalists, human rights lawyers and citizens, the event was organized to advance the constitution’s gender-parity provisions by educating the public and by advocating for women’s rights.

Read more about the colloquium here.

News from the National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty

National Law Center Homelessness & Poverty

Across the country, advocates, including homeless and formerly homeless people, are calling for legislation that protects the basic rights and dignity, and ensures equal access to opportunity regardless of housing status.

Last year, Rhode Island became the first state in the nation to enact an enforceable bill of rights, and the Law Center is proud to have worked with advocates there on that effort.  Since then, similar bills have become law in CT and IL, one is in the works in CA, and advocates in other states are contemplating similar initiatives. We are supporting these efforts and planning more support going forward.

These new laws aim to prevent discrimination based on housing status in the use of public space, as well as in employment, housing, voting.  These are key issues in communities across the country-and such discrimination serves as a barrier preventing their efforts to escape homelessness.  Fighting discriminatory policies with proactive, affirmative campaigns goes to the core of our mission to end and prevent homelessness.

We’re also working with the US Interagency Council on Homelessness, and the Department of Justice to build on the report published by the two agencies last year, Searching out Solutions, and to urge further steps by these and other federal agencies to implement its recommendations. Click here to continue reading. 

Landlord Discrimination Restricts the Use of Rental Vouchers

SOI-MAp_tm-01

Our latest report on housing discrimination found that some of the most blatant acts of discrimination against racial and ethnic minorities have declined over the last decade. However, minority renters and homeowners are still shown and told about fewer properties than similarly qualified whites. These forms of discrimination raise the costs of housing searches for minorities and restrict their choices.

Low-income minority renters face another form of discrimination when using Housing Choice Vouchers (HCV) to help pay for housing. The Housing Choice Voucher Program (HCVP) is the nation’s largest federal housing assistance program, providing more than 2.1 million low-income households with vouchers to subsidize their rent in the private market.  The Federal Fair Housing Act does not prohibit discrimination against renters based on vouchers or other sources of income (SOI).   Although ostensibly HCV facilitates mobility to better neighborhoods, because HCV program participants are not a protected class under the Fair Housing Act, landlords are free to reject their applications because of their voucher. This has the potential to limit housing choice. Continue reading here.