Alaska Legal Services Corp hiring students for paid summer internships

Due Feb. 4: DOJ, Environment and Natural Resources Division at NW Job Fair 

DOJApplication Deadline: Rolling, but interview slots available for Saturday, Feb. 4, 2017.

Patricia McKenna, of the U.S. Department of Justice, Environment and Natural Resources Division, will be at the NW Job Fair in Portland on February 4, 2017. She will be both participating in a brownbag and interviewing for both summer interns for the Environmental Enforcement and Environmental Crimes Sections, as well as interviewing for school year interns for all sections.

Generally, ENRD litigates in five key areas: pollution, lands and natural resources, wildlife, Indian resources, and land acquisition. Attorneys represent many federal agencies by preparing and arguing civil and criminal enforcement cases, appeals, and by defending challenged federal agency actions arising from well over 100 federal environmental laws. The Division handles cases covering a broad spectrum of issues including the listing of endangered species and civil and criminal enforcement of federal pollution control laws.  Cases are at the cutting edge of environmental and natural resources practice. The Division’s work protects our environment for future generations.  Assignments for our interns vary among the sections – but generally, interns assist the Division’s trial lawyers in preparing cases for filing and supporting the litigation effort post-filing, and assist the Division’s appellate lawyers in researching issues on appeal. Responsibilities typically include conducting legal research, drafting pleadings, discovery, and memoranda of law dealing with a variety of federal environmental and natural resource issues.

Read more here

Due Feb. 6, paid: QLaw, CCYJ summer fellowship opportunity

ccyj_logoThe QLaw Foundation Sher Kung Summer Fellow will be responsible for supporting the eQuality Project at the Center for Children & Youth Justice (CCYJ). The eQuality Project is a collaborative effort to ensure Washington’s child welfare and juvenile justice systems better serve lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning/queer youth in their care, collect meaningful data on the needs, experiences and outcomes of LGBTQ youth, and divert LGBTQ youth from homelessness.

Read more about the fellowship and apply here

Due Feb. 10: Summer openings with the Legal Studies Institute

usprograms_retinalogo5Application Deadline: Friday, Feb. 10, 2017

If you’re a first or second year law student looking to practice law in Washington, D.C. with an interest in issues of constitutional interpretation, limited government and free enterprise, please consider applying to the 2017 Legal Studies Institute (LSI).

LSI is an intensive 8-week academic intern program that gives law students first-hand exposure to the American legal system through legal clerkships, academic coursework, networking and career development sessions, and a law and policy lecture series with leading constitutional scholars such as Randy Barnett of Georgetown Law, Ilya Shapiro of the Cato Institute, and Former Attorney General Ed Meese.

Read more and apply here

Due Feb. 17, paid: Alaska Legal Services Corps hiring summer intern

revised_alaska_legal_logo-0120web20transp2010-13Application Deadline: Friday, Feb. 17, 2017

Interested in Providing Legal Services to Rural Communities? Interested in a Summer in Alaska? Would you like $5k to Support your Summer Public Interest Work? If yes, then look no further. Alaska Legal Services Corp is a host organization for the Rural Summer Legal Corps. UW Law student applicants get special preference. Yep, you read that right.

For more information and application instructions, click here. 

Rolling deadline: Public service-oriented firm hiring associate

mallisonmartinezApplication Deadline: Open until filled

Progressive law firm Mallison & Martinez, located in Oakland, is searching for an associate with 1-2 years of experience. The attorney will represent low-wage workers in wage and hour, discrimination, harassment, worker safety, and workplace products liability cases. The attorney will have extensive client contact and the opportunity to work on cases in federal and state courts, mediation, arbitration, and administrative agencies (e.g. California Labor & Workforce Development Agency, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Department of Fair Employment and Housing, and Cal-OSHA). Responsibilities will include junior-level associate work such as: legal research, drafting motions and pleadings, discovery, court appearances, depositions, case management, and client communications.

For more information and application instructions, click here

Rolling deadline, paid: Yale Law School fellowship opportunity 

Yale Law School LogoApplication Deadline: Open until filled

The Jerome N. Frank Legal Services Organization of Yale Law School (LSO) invites applications for its 2017 Summer Fellowship program.  LSO is the main organization at Yale Law School providing legal representation to individuals and organizations in need of legal assistance but unable to afford private attorneys.  During the academic year, law students work closely with clinical faculty members to represent clients in a wide range of litigation and non-litigation matters, helping to fill a critical need in legal services delivery for poor and marginalized communities in Connecticut.  LSO seeks to hire 20-25 Summer Fellows to work with clinical faculty in order to continue this client representation. These are paid positions, with a salary of $6,720 for 12 weeks of full-time work ($14/hour). The Fellowship will run from May 23 to August 18, 2017, with some flexibility as to start and end dates.  Part-time work or full-time work for a portion of the Fellowship period may also be possible.

Read more here

Rolling deadline: Immigration Law & Policy fellowship opportunities

arizonaApplication Deadline: Open until filled

The University of Arizona’s Bacon Immigration Law & Policy Program is hiring for THREE positions: two fellowship positions previously circulated that are still receiving applications for at least a few more weeks, and one new fellowship ideally suited for an attorney with a few years of experience, to work primarily with immigrant workers in our Workers’ Rights Clinic.  This position will start in summer 2017.  Click on each position title to read more.

Don’t Miss Out on Some Terrific Post Grad Opportunities and Fall Paid Internship!

Yakama nationDue 6/8: Yakama Nation Office of Public Defender Seeks Entry-Level Attorney

Employee serves as attorney for the Yakama Nation Public Defender Office and is responsible for providing professional legal representation and advice to Tribal member clients in Tribal, State and Federal Court systems or administrative agencies as assigned by the Lead Attorney Program Manager. Employee is responsible for providing a full range of legal services to Tribal members in areas of criminal, dependency, children’s court, fish and game, civil, family and Federal Indian Law matters, as assigned by the Lead Attorney Program Manager. Services include, legal research, evaluation of potential cases, analysis and preparation of accepted cases, motions, hearings, trials and appeals. The attorney may be appointed by the court(s) as a Guardian Ad Litem in custody matters. WSBA membership and 6 months experience required.

Download full announcement here. Download application here. Application due by: Wednesday, June 8, 2016

Due 7/15: Fall/Winter Part-Time Paid Legal Internship with API Chaya

API Chaya Logo

API Chaya supports Asian, South Asian, and Pacific Islander survivors and families impacted by domestic violence and sexual assault, as well as human trafficking survivors from all communities. API Chaya engages communities to change societal conditions that enable domestic and sexual violence, human trafficking and all forms of oppression, especially violence against women and the most vulnerable in our society.

Legal Intern Duties include:

  • Supporting Advocates to help survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault with legal matters (immigration law, family law, protection orders and criminal law)
  • Accompanying program participants to Protection Order hearings
  • Working with local legal aid organizations to better serve survivors
  • Working in partnership with pro-bono attorneys assisting program participants
  • Possibility of community organizing/engagement opportunities for interns working more hours
  • Other tasks as assigned

Desired qualifications:

  • Bilingual, particularly in Asian, South Asian, or Pacific Island languages
  • Experience or familiarity with the issues we address and communities we serve as well as previous legal experience
  • Have taken courses on family law and immigration law or will be taking it in the course of the internship

The intern will work approximately 10-20 hours/week and will be required to complete extensive training on domestic violence and sexual assault before working with survivors.

Time Frame: A minimum of six months commitment works best for our organization.

This internship runs between September 2016 to June 2017. An intern should be able to commit 10-20 hours a week, for a total of 250-500 hours. Compensation: A $2500 stipend is provided, funded by the South Asian Bar Association of WA. Applicants must be pursuing degrees or career paths in legal work or currently enrolled in law school. If students make a commitment of 2 quarters/semesters, they may independently explore the possibility of receiving a stipend for one quarter/semester and arrange for school credit for the other. To apply, send resume and cover letter to anita@apichaya.org by July 15, 2016.

Due 7/11: US DOJ Seeks RFPs for Anti-Trafficking Post Grad Fellowship

DOJ Logo

The DOJ Office of Justice Programs, Office for Victims of Crime has just posted the 2016 Fellowship solicitation, applications are due July 11, 2016. This single solicitation includes nine purpose areas: Human Trafficking Task Forces, Human Trafficking Survivor-Informed Services, Mass Violence and Terrorism, Post-Conviction Victim Services, Underserved Victims of Sexual Assault, Victim Services in Law Enforcement and Prosecution, Services for Male Victims, Model Standards for Victim Assistance, and Child Sexual Exploitation. OVC intends to make one award in each purpose area of up to $150,000 each. Only individuals may apply, and they don’t have to be recent grads. For complete instructions and application information please see here: http://ojp.gov/ovc/grants/pdftxt/2016-Fellowship-Solicitation-508.pdf

 

Due 6/30: Superior Court of the Northern Mariana Islands Accepting Law Clerk Applications for August Start Date!

Northern_Mariana_Islands_sealPOSITION: Law Clerk to the Honorable Roberto C. Naraja

You will work under the general supervision of the Presiding or an Associate Judge of the Superior Court of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, located on the island of Saipan.

LOCATION:

Saipan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.

JOB DESCRIPTION: Superior Court law clerks conduct legal research, as well as review, edit, and draft bench memoranda, judicial decisions, and orders. Law clerks also assist the Court in its community outreach programs and administrative functions.

REQUIRED QUALIFICATIONS: At the commencement of employment, applicants must be admitted to a bar in any U.S. jurisdiction, or awaiting bar results. Applicants must be able to work both independently as well as with others. Strong legal research and writing skills are essential.

For complete details and application instructions please click here.

Rolling Deadline: Public International Law & Policy Group Seeks Assistant Counsel

Pilpg_officiallogo

Public International Law & Policy Group Overview The Public International Law & Policy Group, a 2005 Nobel Peace Prize nominee, is a non-profit organization that operates as a global, pro bono law firm providing free legal assistance to governments, sub-state entities and civil society groups engaged in negotiating and implementing peace agreements, drafting post-conflict constitutions, and establishing and operating transitional justice mechanisms.  To facilitate the utilization of this legal assistance, PILPG also provides policy formulation advice and training on matters related to conflict resolution.   PILPG has advised over 20 governments, sub-state entities, and civil society organizations involved in the negotiation and implementation of peace agreements, post-conflict constitutions, and transitional justice mechanisms, including in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Burma, Egypt, Darfur, Georgia, Kenya, Kosovo, Iraq, Libya, Montenegro, Nepal, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Syria, Tanzania, Uganda, and Yemen.  PILPG has also provided legal assistance to every international criminal tribunal.

Position Overview:   PILPG’s Washington, D.C. office is currently hiring for Assistant Counsel, who will support PILPG’s work from PILPG’s headquarters in D.C.  Assistant Counsel will be responsible for working closely with Senior Counsel and Counsel to provide legal advice to PILPG’s clients, and help to manage the implementation of programs.  Depending on the nature of the work to which the Assistant Counsel is assigned, travel to PILPG’s field offices and other client locations may be required.

Role & Responsibilities:   The primary duties as Assistant Counsel will include, but shall not be limited to, the following:

  • Researching, drafting, and editing legal memoranda, training materials, policy proposals, and other resources on substantive topics relating to public international law and PILPG clients;
  • Participating in and organizing workshops, trainings, and other PILPG events;
  • Working closely with PILPG’s D.C. office on program design and development;
  • In coordination with PILPG’s Vice President of Strategic Partnerships, collaborating with PILPG’s strategic partners, including private law firms and pro bono staff;
  • Assisting with management of client and key partner relationships, including government officials and members of civil society;
  • Reviewing, editing, and managing the production of legal work produced by PILPG legal research and drafting teams;
  • Providing support to field staff and senior members of program teams with program management tasks, including tracking monitoring and evaluation indicators, establishing and reviewing work plans, and maintaining relationship with donors;
  • Assisting in the drafting and review of periodic reports on program progress for submission to PILPG’s funders; monitoring and reporting requirements for PILPG overseas programs, including the drafting and review of periodic reports;
  • Based on program needs, traveling to work with clients in the field and supporting PILPG programming overseas; and
  • Other duties as assigned.

Qualifications for PILPG Assistant Counsel include:

  • A law degree;
  • A current bar membership;
  • One to three years previous professional experience, preferably in international law or a related field;
  • Previous program management experience preferred, does not necessarily need to be post-law school;
  • Ability to work independently, while also collaborate with a team;
  • Ability to effectively prioritize and manage multiple assignments;
  • Knowledge of public international law;
  • Strong legal drafting, editing, and research skills;
  • Fluency in English; and
  • Fluency in another language, particularly French or Arabic, would be an asset.

Salary: DOE. Applicant should state salary expectations in their cover letter.

Application Instructions: To submit an application for the Assistant Counsel position, submit a resume, cover letter, three references, and writing sample online at http://publicinternationallawandpolicygroup.org/work-for-us/.  The cover letter should outline the candidate’s interest in PILPG and salary expectations.     After receiving completed application materials, PILPG will follow up only if the candidate is selected for an interview. Act Fast! Applications accepted on a rolling basis until position filled.

Due 7/11: Center for Children & Youth Justice Seeks to Sponsor an Applicant for a Two-Year Post Grad Fellowship with Equal Justice Works, Skadden or other Fellowship. Start Fall 2017

CCYJ

FELLOWSHIP SPONSORSHIP – CENTER FOR CHILDREN & YOUTH JUSTICE

The Center for Children & Youth Justice (CCYJ) is seeking to sponsor an applicant for a two-year Equal Justice Works (EJW) Fellowship, Skadden Fellowship, or other post-graduate legal fellowship focused on the replication/expansion of CCYJ’s Lawyers Fostering Independence program (LFI) from its current location in Seattle, WA to areas in need outside of King County. The fellowship would begin in the fall of 2017, is based in Seattle, WA, and will require travel.

Background

The Center for Children & Youth Justice was founded in 2006 with one mission: reform the foster care and juvenile justice systems to improve the lives of generations of children and youth. Our focus is large-scale, lasting systemic change. We carry out the research, pilot projects, policy advocacy, and grassroots engagements that make that change possible. No one else is doing this critical work. Our work is effective because we collaborate with all systems stakeholders including families and youth impacted by systems involvement.

LFI is a one-of-a-kind program that CCYJ began in 2008 with the aim of improving outcomes for current and former foster youth by providing civil legal aid to remove barriers that stand in the way of successful, independent adulthood. Every year in Washington over 500 young people age out of foster care and experience elevated rates of poverty, homelessness, and unemployment as compared to their peers from intact families. Current and former foster youth also struggle to overcome legal impediments, such as juvenile records, bad credit due to identity theft, domestic violence, and housing justice issues. Through the coordinated efforts of volunteer attorneys and partner service providers, LFI is able to help current and former foster youth reach for their future without being blocked by their past. Doing so enables LFI clients to secure stable housing, good employment, and desired education, i.e., the necessary pillars of a successful life. LFI currently operates in King County with the goal of replicating/expanding statewide on a county-by-county basis.

Job Description

CCYJ is eager to sponsor a law student graduating in 2017 or recent law school graduate (including judicial law clerks) who are interested in partnering with CCYJ to apply for an Equal Justice Works Fellowship to start in Fall 2017. The sponsored candidate would work with CCYJ to submit a project proposal to research, design, implement, and evaluate the sustainable replication/expansion of LFI into other Washington counties in collaboration with community partners. If selected, under the supervision of LFI’s Managing Attorney, the fellow will:

  • Provide direct service and representation to clients to further develop context for general legal issues faced by LFI clients and for a deep understanding of how LFI operates now and how it can best be replicated/expanded elsewhere
  • Research and identify county-based need/demand and existing support structures for LFI services in selected areas in Washington
  • Develop a manual to be used in aid of the replication/expansion of LFI
  • Coordinate and lead an advisory group in counties identified for replication/expansion
  • Build local partnerships with law firms, service providers, and community stakeholders to learn about local issues and ensure success of services implemented
  • Recruit, train, and provide support to volunteer attorneys
  • Provide educational workshops to service providers and community stakeholders to increase engagement and support for the services implemented
  • Lead and evaluate data collection and program evaluation
  • Provide advocacy and support for legislative efforts on laws supportive of LFI clients
  • Provide other support, as needed, to LFI’s Managing Attorney

Requirements

  • Graduate from an accredited law school by the time the fellowship begins
  • Apply for bar membership in Washington state within the first year of the fellowship, or before
  • Demonstrate commitment to serving the underserved
  • Be a motivated, ambitious, self-starter
  • Possess skills in oral and written communication
  • Fluent in English 

Preferred Requirements

  • Graduate from an EJW member law school
  • Have skills needed to effectively conduct community meetings and educational workshops
  • Possess ability and interest in community engagement
  • Have experience working in civil legal aid, volunteer coordination, and/or social services
  • Fluent in Spanish

Salary

DOE, competitive with other Seattle-based nonprofit organizations focused on legal services

Application Instructions

Interested candidates for fellowship sponsorship should send a one-page cover letter, resume, writing sample, and unofficial law school transcript to Hickory Gateless at hgateless@ccyj.org with the subject line, “CCYJ Fellowship 2017”. The Application Deadline is July 11, 2016.

 

 

 

 

 

Are you a Strategic Thinker Looking for a Service Opportunity? Washington’s Access to Justice Board Could Use Your Help!

Opportunity for Service: Washington State Access to Justice Board

ATJ Logo

The Access to Justice Board is seeking a strategic thinker with a demonstrated commitment to equitable justice to fill a seat on the Access to Justice Board.  Established by the Washington Supreme Court in 1994, the Board seeks to achieve equal access to the civil justice system for those facing economic and other significant barriers.  The three-year term begins in May 2015 and the position may be filled by an attorney or other community member.  The Board is especially interested in individuals who can help continue to build collaborative relationships with community-based organizations and the Alliance for Equal Justice.

To apply and/or learn more about the work of the Access to Justice Board, please visit www.wsba.org/ATJApplications are due January 9, 2015 at 5PM PST.

Request for Workshop Proposals: Access to Justice Conference

ATJ Workshop

Wenatchee Conference Center, June 12-14

The Access to Justice Board’s Conference Planning Committee is now accepting proposals for 2015 Access to Justice Conference workshops.  This year’s conference will focus on solutions to address structural impediments to equitable justice and meet the needs of our growing client community.  We encourage and invite you to submit a 90 minute workshop proposal for consideration by the committee.  Proposals should be consistent with the criteria outlined in the attached document.  All workshops will take place on Saturday, June 13, 2015 at the Wenatchee Convention Center.

Proposals must be received by 5 p.m., Friday, January 23, 2015. Submit proposals using the attached form to Terra Nevitt, terran@wsba.org. Electronic submissions only please. The conference planning committee will select the workshops and plenary sessions. You will be notified as soon as the final decisions have been made whether or not your proposal was selected. If your proposal is selected you will receive more detailed information about the conference planning process, procedures, policies and deadlines.  If you have questions, please call Terra at (206) 727-8282.

Washington State Association for Justice Offering Bar Preparation Scholarship for Diversity and Women, Apply Now for Exam Dates in July 2015/February 2016

WSAJ Logo

The Mission of the Washington State Association for Justice (WSAJ) is to stand up in the courtroom and the halls of government for real people. We defend your Constitutional rights, including the right to have your day in court. We hold corporate and other powerful interests accountable. We are a community creating and sharing resources for our members to secure justice.

WSAJ is committed to implementing strategies that will result in significant and measurable progress towards increasing diversity in the plaintiff’s bar. To help achieve this endeavor, WSAJ has pledged scholarship monies to assist diverse individuals in covering the tuition cost of a bar preparation course. Diversity refers to individuals who self-identify with those groups historically discriminated against and or those groups that are historically under-represented in the legal profession based on disability, gender, race, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression. Scholarship recipients will be selected based on several criteria, including (but not limited to) demonstrated interest and intent to practice in the plaintiff’s bar, financial need, academic achievements, extracurricular and community activities, and life experiences. No single criteria is determinative.

Applications are due by Monday, January 12, 2015. 

For more information on the diversity scholarship, click here.
For more information on the scholarship for women, click here.

Lawyers Fostering Independence Offering Free CLE This Friday

CCYJ

Lawyers Fostering Independence (LFI) provides free civil legal services to young people who have been in foster, group, or kinship care at some point while growing up. With the help of volunteer attorneys, our mission is to improve outcomes for former foster youth by providing them with access to legal services – services that can mitigate the specific adversities experienced by these youth who have been raised in our care.

Our all-day training is on December 5th from 9:00am-3:30pm at Garvey Schubert Barer.

The morning will consist of an introduction to LFI, hearing from former foster youth about their experiences and needs, and our Trauma-Informed Legal Representation CLE (1.5 ethics credits pending). The afternoon will include two training sessions: one on credit and debt issues and the other on sealing juvenile records and vacating adult records. 1.25 CLE credits pending for each of these sessions.

A light breakfast and lunch will be provided.

Contact Serena Holthe to register.  Click here for more information.

The Innocence Project NW  Freedom Fridays

IPNW

Friday, December 5, 2014
12:00 – 4:00 PM 
Dorsey Whitney, 701 5th Avenue, Suite 6100, Seattle, WA

Speakers:

  • Jacqueline McMurtrie is an Associate Professor at the University of Washington School of Law and the founder and Director of the Innocence Project Northwest (IPNW). The only resource of its kind in Washington State, IPNW’s mission is to exonerate the innocent, remedy causes of wrongful conviction and offer law students an outstanding education. Since 1997, IPNW has obtained exonerations of thirteen men and women who collectively served over 90 years in prison for crimes they did not commit.
  • Fernanda Torres is a Staff Attorney and Volunteer Coordinator at the Innocence Project Northwest (IPNW). She helps oversee the screening and review of applications for assistance and leads the litigation of non-DNA cases. She recruits and supervises IPNW volunteers. Prior to joining IPNW, Ms. Torres practiced criminal defense as a public defender and in private practice.

For more information, click here.

Pro Bono Opportunity with the King County Bar Association’s Housing Justice Project and Family Law Program

KCBA Logo

The Housing Justice Project is a walk-in legal clinic providing counsel and advice, negotiations with landlords or opposing counsel, and limited representation for low income residential tenants facing eviction in King county. HJP clinics operate at the King County Courthouse in Seattle and the Maleng Regional Justice Center in Kent.

Apply to volunteer as an intern by January 25, 2015. For more information about the Housing Justice Project, click here.

Pro Bono Services family law programs promote family safety and equal access to the legal system by assisting domestic violence survivors, children at risk of abuse or neglect and clients facing barriers to accessing the courts due to language, disability or other factors. Programs include the Family Law Mentor Program, Kinship Care Solutions Project and Self Help Plus Program.

Position is open until filled.  For more information about the Family Law Program, click here.

Pro Bono Opportunity Working with Domestic Violence Survivors

DAWN Logo

Your role as a Family Law Legal Support volunteer will be to assist staff attorneys in their representation of the client.

Note that this position is based out of the Domestic Abuse Women’s Network (DAWN) offices in Tukwila, WA to support the ELAP DV Staff Attorney placed on-site at DAWN.

This is a volunteer opportunity provided by VolunteerMatch, in partnership with LinkedIn for Good.

For more information, click here.

Equity and Social Justice Work is Hard. Seriously Hard Work. No, Really it is.

Pushing Stone Graphic

By: Cultures Connecting Blog

Significant change, whether individual or within an organization can be challenging. Even when we want to change, it doesn’t happen easily. I recently heard implicit bias compared to a habit, albeit a bad one. Think about how hard it is to change a habit…

A couple of months ago, my brother in law was coming over to my house to pick up his dog after work. We’d talked earlier and he reminded me to leave the front door open for him. Then he sent me a text about 15 minutes before I was leaving as a second reminder. “Leave the door unlocked, leave the door unlocked,” I chanted in my head as I gathered my things to go. Then I went through my mental list of what I needed to bring with me, made sure I had it all, walked out, locked the door and left. His poor dog was locked inside.

Even though I wanted to change that habit and was focusing a lot of mental energy on doing something different, the moment I got distracted, I forgot and went back to what I do every day.

Now imagine there are a bunch of individuals trying to change an organization. But they’ve all learned and practiced habits of stereotypes, biases, and institutional oppression for years. Some have even gotten rewarded for this behavior by being told they’re a “good fit” at the company and getting promoted. Some are the founders of the organization or have worked there so long they see any mention of needed change as a personal affront. Others have been going along to get along, trying not to make waves by bringing up experiences of marginalization. They may even be telling themselves they imagined it or making excuses for oppressive behavior such as, “I know he didn’t mean it that way.”

Continue reading here.