Attention 2Ls and 3Ls! Sign Up to Learn More About Upcoming Judicial Clerkships!

Are you considering a post-graduate judicial clerkship?

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If so, sign up for one of UW Law’s judicial clerkship mailing lists by clicking the link for your class:

Please include your full name to expedite the approval process. We often send information about judicial clerkships to these mailing lists rather than the entire student body.

As you may have heard, some judges begin reviewing applications outside of any established recruiting schedule. We collect this information and share it as often as we can, but it is important for you to also do your own research into courts and judges.

2Ls and 3Ls, we also encourage you to create an account on OSCAR (www.oscar.uscourts.gov), which federal judges use to post clerkship information and collect applications.

1Ls will have access to OSCAR later in the school year.

Call for Submissions for the Women’s Human Rights Special Issue of Canadian Woman Studies, Submission Deadline Extended to January 30

Canadian Woman Studies Cover

This special double issue of Canadian Woman Studies’ (CWS/cf) will focus on feminist women’s human rights theory and activism as a visionary framework for movement-building and social change, activism and education, considering both the historical trajectory of this movement, current efforts, challenges and debates, as well as possibilities for the future in troubled times. Since a locally-grounded, globally-engaged transnational women’s movement led to the international recognition in the 1990s that women’s rights are human rights, many women from all regions have organized under this shared banner while simultaneously shaping human rights discourse according to their unique and diverse needs, perspectives, and visions for a just world. By using CEDAW, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (the UN women’s human rights convention), and other international and regional human rights mechanisms, and also by engaging in their broad social justice work from a women’s human rights perspective, feminists have contributed to transformative understandings and analysis of women’s human rights that reflect the diversity of women’s experiences and take into account intersectional discrimination. Indigenous women activists in particular are expanding the understanding of women’s human rights by linking violence against women with struggles for land, water, self-determination, and against transnational corporations and mining companies.

Articles should be typed, double-spaced, and a maximum of 16 pages long (4000 words).  A short (50-word) abstract of the article and a brief biographical note must accompany each submission.

For more information, click here.

Deportation Measures in Action: What Obama’s Enforcement Means for Immigration

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By: Washington State Bar Association

U.S. immigration laws contain numerous grounds upon which non-citizens, including green card holders, may be deported back to their country of origin. While deportation laws have largely remained the same over past decades, recent changes to their enforcement have made deportation a key concern for thousands of immigrants and attorneys who serve them in Washington, where 13.5% of the state’s population is foreign-born.

The government outlines priorities for deporting particular immigrants, but the numbers of those deportations are rising regardless. In 2011, 392,000 immigrants were deported from the U.S., but only 48% of those cases were linked to breaking a law inside the country.

Continue reading here.

Study on Composition of International Bodies Shows that Women are Under-Represented

Want Direct Client Experience and Make a Difference? Applications Now Being Accepted for Bridging the Gap/Moderate Means Program- Due 10/19

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Bridging the Gap provides legal referrals for low and moderate income individuals as a part of the WSBA Moderate Means Program.

Bridging the Gap is a UW Law in-house pro bono program. The goal of the program is to increase access to civil legal services for people of moderate means who cannot afford an attorney but make too much money to qualify for traditional free legal aid services. The program is focused in the areas of Family, Housing and Consumer law.

Law students serving as Bridging the Gap volunteer interns interview potential clients by telephone to collect information and evaluate their cases. Qualifying cases will be referred by interns to participating attorneys who have agreed to represent clients for a reduced fee. After completing training, Bridging the Gap interns will be expected to commit to a minimum of five hours a week for the duration of fall and winter quarters (one hour is a weekly staff meeting).

Benefits to students:

  • Hands-on experience interviewing clients;
  • Training in substantive legal issues, issue-spotting, interviewing skills and ethics;
  • Instruction on how to use the Legal Server database, which is used by most of the civil legal aid organizations in Washington State, and many other states;
  • Supervision and mentoring by experienced attorneys;
  • The satisfaction of helping low and moderate income individuals who otherwise might not receive any legal help at all;
  • Time spent volunteering for Bridging the Gap counts for recognition with the Pro Bono Honors Society.

Upper level students (2L, 3L and LLM) may participate in training for the program now (fall quarter) and begin interviewing clients in November. 1Ls can train now and begin interviewing clients in January.

To apply for the program, submit a letter of interest and resume to Ann Spangler at spangler@uw.edu by October 19, 2015.

GQUAL Campaign to Increase Gender Parity on International Rights Bodies

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According to a study conducted by GQUAL, the lack of gender parity, specifically the underrepresentation of women, affects almost all international tribunals and monitoring bodies. They report that women hold only 17% of positions on international courts and 25% of positions on regional human rights bodies. The GQUAL Declaration notes that States are generally responsible for nominating and electing candidates to these international bodies, but often lack transparent guidelines and procedures for such processes. Additionally, most States do not have mechanisms to correct gender disparities. By not respecting the principle of non-discrimination, States Parties may be in violation of Article 8 of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW).

Continue reading here.

Call for Submissions: American University Washington College of Law’s Human Rights Essay Award Competition, Deadline 2/1/2016

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Are you interested in attending an all-expense paid 3 week summer program on Human Rights and Humanitarian Law taught by over 40 world-renowned practitioners and academics at American University Washington College of Law? Well, now is your chance! Submit an essay to the Human Rights Essay Award Competition and you could be the lucky winner to receive a scholarship to attend the 2016 Program of Advanced Studies in Human Rights and Humanitarian Law from May 31 – June 17. This year’s topic is “Extractive Industries and Human Rights” and the deadline to submit is February 1, 2016. Participants have the flexibility to choose any subject related to the assigned topic. The best articles may be published in the American University International Law Review.

This annual competition sponsored by the Academy on Human Rights and Humanitarian Law seeks to stimulate the production of scholarly work in international human rights law. The Academy will grant two Awards, one for the best article in English and one for the best article in Spanish. The Award in each case will consist of: a scholarship to the Academy’s Program of Advanced Studies, travel expenses to Washington D.C., housing at the university dorms and a per diem for living expenses.

For more information, click here.

Jameson Crane III Disability and Law Writing Competition, Deadline 1/15/2016

James Crane Writing Competition

Thomas Jefferson School of Law is pleased to announce the second Jameson Crane III Disability and the Law Writing Competition. Made possible by the generous gift of Thomas Jefferson School of Law alumnus Jameson Crane III, this competition seeks to encourage outstanding student scholarship at the intersection of law and medicine, or law and the social sciences. The competition promotes an understanding of these topics, furthers the development of legal rights and protections, and improves the lives of those with disabilities. Submissions will be judged anonymously by an independent panel of experts.

If you win, you will get a $1,500 cash prize and Thomas Jefferson Law Review (TJLR) will consider the paper for publication under the TJLR’s editorial standards.  Two second place winners will each receive a $1,000 cash prize.  (Preference for these additional winners will be given to submissions from disciplines not represented by the grand prize winner.)

For more information, click here.

There is still time to register for the Equal Justice Works 2015 Conference and Career Fair!

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Friday, October 23 & Saturday, October 24
Crystal Gateway Marriott

While the period to apply for prescheduled interviews has closed, students and recent graduates may register through October 9 to speak with employers during table talk and to attend conferences sessions.

NETWORK with more than 150 public interest employers. We have heard from many employers and students that interviews and job offers have been secured from meetings during table talk!

LEARN during our conference sessions lead by experienced public interest attorneys on international and immigration careers, managing student debt, and how students can organize to fight injustice!

Learn more and register here! Registration deadline is October 9

National Juvenile Defender Center Publishes Juvenile Defense Policy and Practice Career Resource Guide

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The National Juvenile Defender Center prepared the Juvenile Defense Policy and Practice Career Resource Guide to provide students and others with valuable resources to jumpstart a juvenile defense career. It includes information on coursework and externships that will help strengthen a candidate’s application in the juvenile defense field; resources to guide in the search for juvenile defense jobs, fellowships, and funding opportunities; and a list of offices around the country that provide employment and internship opportunities specific to juvenile defense.

Click here for the resource guide.

Would you like access to free hands on legal training, CLE credits, and networking opportunities to help start your own law practice? If so, ELAP Family Law Fellowship is the Answer!

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Eastside Legal Assistance Program is now accepting applications this month for this November’s fellowship class.  The yearlong program is an opportunity for newly licensed attorneys pursuing a career in family law to gain direct experience in a supportive environment. Fellows volunteer half-time while receiving computer access, desks, phones, mentorship and training in Family Law, Domestic Violence, motions practice and pre-trial/trial preparation. ELAP will also provide law office management training to assist the attorneys in establishing their own offices. And Fellows are covered by ELAP’s malpractice insurance for all work done on ELAP cases.

For more information, click here.

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (“CFPB”) Releases New Tool Called “Your Money Your Goals” For Financial Empowerment

Volunteer for Citizenship Day in Moses Lake, and Pasco on Saturday, September 19

Citizenship Day

Date: Saturday, Sept. 19, 2015
Time: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
Location(s): Moses Lake – Big Bend Community College, ATEC Building 1800, 7611 Bolling St NE, Moses Lake, WA 98837; Pasco – Columbia Basic College, Center for Career & Technical Education (corner of W. Argent Rd & Saraceno Way), Pasco, WA 99301

Citizenship Day is a FREE one-day legal clinic to help legal permanent residents apply for citizenship and it is hosted by the WA State Chapter of the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) and OneAmerica. Citizenship is a critical part of American Dream for many immigrant families, but the high cost of attorneys and fear of the process stop many eligible people from becoming citizens. We’ll have volunteer immigration lawyers, paralegals and interpreters on hand to help eligible permanent residents successfully fill out citizenship applications (N-400s).  It’s a great way to earn community service hours without a long-term commitment, meet other students, and help your community.

WE ARE IN NEED OF INTERPRETERS: General volunteers and bilingual interpreters (Spanish and English) are needed at the Pasco and Moses Lake sites on September 19th. If you are interest in helping, please email Katelyn Chrisman at Katelyn@weareoneamerica.org, and SIGN UP HERE.

To sign up, click here. 

Latina/o Bar Association of Washington (LBAW) Offers 2015-2016 Mentorship Program, Sign Up Now!

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We are excited to reintroduce LBAW’s Mentorship Program.  We encourage you to sign up!

If you would like to be a part of LBAW’s 2015-2016 Mentorship Program, please complete the mentor form or mentee form and return it to membership@lbaw.org no later than Tuesday, September 22. 

LBAW’s Mentor/Mentee Welcome will be held Friday, September 25, at the home of LBAW’s President Chach Duarte White on Mercer Island at 5:30 p.m.—8:00 p.m.  Come eat, drink, and meet your mentor/mentee!  Details will be included in the next LBAW Announcement and on the LBAW website and Facebook page.  We look forward to seeing you!

Registration Now Open for Stanford Law School’s 16th Annual Shaking the Foundations Progressive Lawyering Conference on October 17

Shaking the Foundations 2015

Stanford Law School’s 16th annual Shaking the Foundations conference will be on Saturday, October 17, 2015. This year, we are excited to feature Bay Area workers’ rights advocate Saru Jayaraman, author of Behind the Kitchen Door, as our keynote speaker at 10 a.m.

Shaking the Foundations brings the progressive community together each year to discuss issues within the movement, explore the role of young lawyers, and encourage attendees to work toward social and environmental justice. This year’s conference will focus on West Coast issues. Panel and workshop topics include criminal justice, immigration, racial justice, LGBTQ rights, environmental justice, consumer protection, Native American law, labor, housing, and other progressive topics. Check out our website for the full schedule.

To register, click here.

Pro Bono For Financial Empowerment

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By William J. Woodward, Jr. | ABA Center for Pro Bono Exchange

“Holistic pro bono” is an idea whose time may have come. When used in the legal pro bono community, the term refers to supplying a needy client with help that may go beyond legal help to include help from other professionals such as housing counselors, addiction experts, accountants, technology specialists, and so on.

The idea may have just had a substantial boost from the work of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (the “CFPB”), the Federal agency created by the Dodd-Frank law and charged with protecting consumers of financial products and services. While the agency has regulatory and enforcement power, Congress also charged it broadly with educating consumers in financial matters.

Continue reading here.

Call for Submissions for the 11th Annual Sarah Weddington Writing Prize for New Student Scholarship in Reproductive Rights

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Law Students for Reproductive Justice, in collaboration with the Center for Reproductive Rights and the Center on Reproductive Rights and Justice at Berkeley Law School, is pleased to announce the Call for Submission for the eleventh annual Sarah Weddington Writing Prize for New Student Scholarship in Reproductive Rights.

This year, the Sarah Weddington Writing Prize’s suggested theme is “Restoring Public Insurance Coverage for Abortion,” with a focus on the Hyde Amendment and Harris v. McRae (1980). However, submissions on other topics will also be accepted.

The deadline for submission is Monday, January 18, 2016.  Winning authors will receive cash prizes: $750 (first place), $500 (second place), or $250 (third place).  Additionally, each winning author will receive a copy of the newly released casebook, Melissa Murray and Kristin Luker’s Cases on Reproductive Rights and Justice. The first place winner will also have a chance at publication with the NYU Review of Law and Social Change.

For more information, please download the 2015 Call for Submissions here.

UW CAYLAC Clinic Helps Open New Opportunities Through Juvenile Justice Law

Starting Today, Juvenile Justice Law Opens Up Opportunities for Tens of Thousands of Washingtonians 

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By Columbia Legal Services

Today, tens of thousands of Washingtonians, and thousands of youth every year, will have significantly more opportunities despite childhood mistakes. This historic change comes as a result of a major juvenile justice law – the Youth Equality and Reintegration Act (SB 5564) – which was passed by the Washington legislature this past legislative session. […]

The prime legislative sponsors were Sen. Steve O’Ban (R-University Place) and Rep. Ruth Kagi (D-Seattle) and the advocacy was also led by students from the University of Washington Children and Youth Legislative Advocacy Clinic. More information on the YEAR Act is available here.

Read the entire publication here.

Washington Journal of Environmental Law & Policy (WJELP) Hosting First Annual Symposium on Ocean Acidification and Coastal Health, Now Accepting Paper Submissions

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The Washington Journal of Environmental Law & Policy (WJELP) invites submissions for papers focused on ocean acidification. Partnering with the UW Law Environmental Law Program, WJELP will be hosting an Ocean Acidification Symposium on November 6, 2015. Accepted papers will be featured at the symposium and later printed in an edited volume. Submitted papers should relate to the growing need for law and policy addressing ocean acidification, strategies to manage ocean acidification at various scales (local, regional, national and global), and other related topics (using ocean acidification to target CO2 emissions, sustainable aquaculture, land-based sources of water pollution, etc.). We also welcome proposals for symposium speakers. Paper submissions due by October 16, 2015.

For more information, click here.

World Health Organization Releases New Publication on Sexual Health, Human Rights and the Law

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Sexual health today is widely understood as a state of physical, emotional, mental and social wellbeing in relation to sexuality. It encompasses not only certain aspects of reproductive health – such as being able to control one’s fertility through access to contraception and abortion, and being free from sexually transmitted infections (STIs), sexual dysfunction and sequelae related to sexual violence or female genital mutilation – but also, the possibility of having pleasurable and safe sexual experiences, free of coercion, discrimination and violence. Indeed, it has become clear that human sexuality includes many different forms of behaviour and expression, and that the recognition of the diversity of sexual behaviour and expression contributes to people’s overall sense of well-being and health.

Continue reading here.

Judges Rebuke Limits on Wiping Out Student Loans

Janet Roth (Photo (c) Nick Cote, NYT)

By Tara Siegel Bernard | New York Times

[…] The judge, Jim D. Pappas, in his concurring opinion for the bankruptcy appellate panel decision in the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, said the analysis used “to determine the existence of an undue hardship is too narrow, no longer reflects reality and should be revised.”

He added: “It would seem that in this new, different environment, in determining whether repayment of a student loan constitutes an undue hardship, a bankruptcy court should be afforded flexibility to consider all relevant facts about the debtor and the subject loans.” But the current standard, he wrote, “does not allow it.”

Read the entire article here.  Photo courtesy of Nick Cote, New York Times.

EEOC Bans Discrimination Against Gays in Workplaces

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By Sue Reisinger | Corporate Counsel

In a historic decision, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has ruled that all job discrimination based on sexual orientation is a form of sex discrimination under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

The 3-2 decision, dated July 16, does what Congress and most courts so far have refused to do: ban discrimination against gays in the workplace. Until now only a handful of states and municipalities have done so.

The EEOC foreshadowed its decision in a field memo last February saying that workers are protected under Title VII from discrimination based on sexual orientation as well as gender identity.

Continue reading here.

Attention New and Young Lawyers! Service Opportunity with the WSBA, Due 8/14

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The Washington Young Lawyers Committee encourages WSBA’s new and young lawyers to apply to serve as a young lawyer liaison to one of the following sections:

Apply now! Deadline is Friday, Aug. 14, at 5 p.m.

For more information about the volunteer position and application process, click here.

Have you Already Secured a Summer Internship doing Social Justice Work? Don’t Miss Out on an Early Application for Funding

On Human Rights Day, UN Official Calls for Member States to ‘Stamp Out Torture’

Jean-Marc Ferre

By: UN News Centre

10 December 2014 – Governments must ramp up their efforts in eradicating the practice of torture and compensate the victims of this “most vicious of crimes,” the top United Nations human rights official has urged, as he marked the 30th anniversary of the adoption of the Convention against Torture.

In a press statement issued today following the release of two “ground-breaking” reports – one from the United States and another from Brazil – on the use of torture by both Governments, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, called on all Member States “to act unequivocally” in stamping out the practice.

“Today is not only Human Rights Day,” Mr. Zeid said, as he recalled the UN-backed observance commemorating the date on which the General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, “it is also the 30th anniversary of the adoption of the Convention against Torture on 10 December 1984.”

“Yet, as yesterday’s US Senate Select Committee on Intelligence report shows, torture is still taking place in quite a few of the 156 countries that have ratified the Convention against Torture and have domestic legislation making it illegal.”

Continue reading here. Photo credit: UN Photo/Jean-Marc Ferré

2015 Haywood Burns Memorial Fellowship for Social and Economic Justice, Applications Due 1/12/15

Haywood Burns

The Haywood Burns Fellowships are designed to encourage students to work in the National Lawyer’s Guild’s tradition of “people’s lawyering.” The program exists to help students apply their talents and skills to find creative ways to use the law to advance justice. Burns Fellowships provoke law students to question traditional notions of how one must practice law and to provide a summer experience that will enrich and challenge them.

Over the years, the Summer Projects program has expanded to place hundreds of students with public interest organizations working to protect and further the civil rights of oppressed people in the United States. Although providing legal work under the direction of their attorney-organizers is important, the primary mission of the summer projects is to strengthen each student’s long-term commitment to promote justice and equality. Fellows have worked with groups to provide legal, political, and educational support on a wide variety of issues, including voting rights; union democracy; workplace health and safety; the death penalty and prison reform; lesbian/gay/bisexual/trans rights; defense of protesters from police harassment and criminal sanctions; and international human rights.

For more information, click here.

Human Rights Essay Award: Call for Submissions, Due 2/1/15

WCL

Are you interested in attending an all-expense paid 3 week summer program on Human Rights and Humanitarian Law taught by over 39 world-renowned practitioners and academics at American University Washington College of Law? Well, now is your chance! Submit an essay to the Human Rights Essay Award Competition and you could be the lucky winner to receive a scholarship to attend the 2015 Program of Advanced Studies in Human Rights and Humanitarian Law. This year’s topic is “Transitional Justice, International Human Rights and Humanitarian Law” and the deadline to submit is February 1, 2015. Participants have the flexibility to choose any subject related to the assigned topic. The best articles may be published in the American University International Law Review.

This annual competition sponsored by the Academy on Human Rights and Humanitarian Law seeks to stimulate the production of scholarly work in international human rights law. The Academy will grant two Awards, one for the best article in English and one for the best article in Spanish. The Award in each case will consist of: a scholarship to the Academy’s Program of Advanced Studies, travel expenses to Washington D.C., housing at the university dorms and a per diem for living expenses.

For detailed guidelines about the award, click here.

Attention US Citizens! David L. Boren Fellowship, Applications Due 1/27/15

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The David L. Boren Fellowship provides a unique funding opportunity for U.S. students to study in world regions critical to U.S. interests (Africa, Asia, Central & Eastern Europe, Eurasia, Latin America, and the Middle East).  Boren Fellows receive up to $24,000 for overseas study or up to $30,000 for a combination of overseas and domestic study.

Deadline: January 27, 2015 at 2:00 PM (PST)

For UW Information Session Webinars: December 9, 2014 and January 6, 2015.  Register online here.

For more information, click here.