Coming up: Challenging Injustice Through the Courts with Bob Ferguson

May 1: Farshad M. Talebi, Assistant Attorney General, Washington State Attorney General’s Office

Time: 12:30 to 1:20 p.m.
Date: Monday, May 1, 2017
Place: UW School of Law, Room 133

“Fighting Human Trafficking — A Local Response to a Global Problem” ILO and the U.S. State Department estimate that there are at least 20.9 million adults and children who are victims of forced labor, bonded labor, and commercial sexual servitude at any given time. No state or country is free from human trafficking, including Washington. The commercial sexual exploitation of women, girls and boys throughout WA is extensive.  There are also known cases of labor trafficking in WA. Mr. Talebi will discuss key efforts in Washington State to fight international and domestic human trafficking.

Farshad Talebi leads the newly created Human Trafficking and Child Exploitation Unit in the Washington State Attorney General’s Office, which is a multidisciplinary team dedicated to prosecuting and preventing sex and labor trafficking through law enforcement and policy development. His experience includes drafting human trafficking legislation and legislative reports and developing policy work through the coordination of Washington State anti-trafficking efforts between law enforcement, prosecutors, state and federal agencies, and community based organization. He serves as the Convening Chair of the Commercially Sexually Exploited Children (CSEC) Statewide Coordinating Committee, as Chair of the Coordination Committee, Washington State Task Force Against the Trafficking of Persons, and as AGO Representative to the Washington Advisory Committee on Trafficking (WashACT).

May 3: Celebrating Women in Law

Time: 5:30 p.m
Date: Wednesday, May 3, 2017
Place: UW School of Law, Room 138

We’d love to have you at Celebrating Women, an annual event honoring women in Seattle’s legal community hosted by the UW School of Law Women’s Law Caucus. This year we’ll host former Governor Christine Gregoire for a conversation with Dean Testy on using the law in the community. We hope you can join us! We’ll also honor three attorneys, and we’d love your nominations. We’d like to honor women in the legal community in three categories: Career Excellence in the Private Sector, Career Excellence in the Public Sector, and Outstanding Achievement by a Young Lawyer. Please let us know below if there’s someone you would like to nominate. Thank you, and please feel free to invite anyone else in the community who you think would enjoy the event!

Register here.

May 5: Challenging Injustice Through the Courts with Bob Ferguson

Time: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Date: Friday,  May 5, 2017
Place: Kane Hall, Room 210

Each spring, UWCHR organizes an event to celebrate human rights in our community. This year, we hope that you can join us to honor Washington State Attorney General Bob Ferguson. We will present the AG with the inaugural University of Washington Center for Human Rights Justice Award for his contributions to the protection of human rights. In February, a lawsuit by Ferguson’s office successfully blocked the Trump administration’s executive order banning travel to the U.S. by Syrian refugees and citizens from seven majority-Muslim countries. Attorney General Ferguson will deliver a speech on “Challenging Injustice Through the Courts.”

Read more and apply here.

June 2 to 4: Register now for the Access to Justice Conference

Time: All day
Date: Friday, June 2 to Sunday, June 4, 2017
Place: Yakima Convention Center, Yakima, WA

“This is go time for the civil legal aid community. The time has come to register and get your hotel rooms,” said conference co-chair Ishbel Dickens. “The planning committee has worked really hard over the last couple of months, taking over thirty proposals and blending them into opportunities to share, learn and interact toward a common purpose.”

Break-out sessions will give you tools and knowledge to take on race equity issues, breakdown institutional silos, and create partnerships.

Read more and register here.

Upcoming events with Student and Career Services

Garvey Schubert Barer 2L Summer Diversity Fellowship Info Session: Session led by Attorneys and Recruiters from Garvey Schubert Barer

Time: 9:30 to 10:30 a.m
Date: Monday, May 1, 2017
Place: UW School of Law, Room 115

Landing a 2L Summer Job Part 1: Student Panel. Session led by 2L and 3L students and the SCS Team

Time: 12:30 to 1:20 p.m.
Date: Tuesday, May 2, 2017
Place: UW School of Law, Room 138

Coffee Talk with Owen Martikan from Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Join CFPB Enforcement Attorney Owen Martikan for a discussion about his work and employment opportunities with the CFPB.

Time: 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.
Date: Wednesday, May 3, 2017
Place: UW School of Law, Room 447

Academic Advising Information Session – International and Comparative Law. Session led by International, Transnational and Comparative Law Program Director Anita Ramasastry

Time: 12:30 to 1:20 p.m.
Date: Thursday, May 4, 2017
Place: UW School of Law, Room 116

Academic Advising Information Session – Intellectual Property Law. Session led by CASRIP Director Zahr Said and IP LLM Director Robert Gomulkiewicz

Time: 12:30 to 1:20 p.m.
Date: Friday, May 5, 2017
Place: UW School of Law, Room 116

Need summer funding? Apply for the Fitzpatrick Fellowship

Due April 3: Fitzpatrick Fellowship summer funding available

Application Deadline: Monday, April 3, 2017

Professor Joan M. Fitzpatrick was a much loved and universally respected professor of human rights and international law at University of Washington School of Law. She helped establish human rights law as a legitimate field of legal specialization, tackling issues such as protecting refugees, promoting women’s rights, campaigning for gay and lesbian rights, and enforcing human rights during states of emergency. After her untimely death, students of Professor Fitzpatrick, determined to honor their beloved professor and the ideals she stood for, established the Joan M. Fitzpatrick Fellowship in Human Rights as a permanent memorial in her name.

The Fellowship is for a UW School of Law student with a demonstrated commitment to international human rights and an interest in working in the field in the future. The Fellowship award is intended to enable the recipient to travel and work at a nongovernmental, governmental or intergovernmental organization working on human rights and make a significant contribution during the period of fellowship (typically during the summer). The Fellowship is not intended to support research at an academic institution.

Read more and get application here.

Seattle Office for Civil Rights opens hotline to report discriminatory harassment 

Seattle Office for Civil Rights

The Seattle Office for Civil Rights (SOCR) today announced a new hotline for people to report harassment in Seattle. The Hotline is part of the City of Seattle’s Bias Hurts Campaign for Seattle residents and business owners who are the targets of discriminatory harassment, including threats, slurs, intimidation and cyberbullying. Call 206.233.7100 or go online to report discriminatory harassment. 

AG Ferguson to U.S. Supreme Court: Uphold transgender rights

Originally published March 3, 2017 by Washington State Attorney General’s Office. Media contact Peter Lavellee.

“Late yesterday, Attorney General Bob Ferguson led a coalition of 18 states and the District of Columbia in urging the United States Supreme Court to uphold a lower court ruling recognizing the right of a transgender student in Virginia to use the school bathroom corresponding to his gender identity. The states, co-led by Ferguson and New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, filed an amicus, or “friend of the court,” brief in Gloucester County School Board v. G.G.

Gavin Grimm, a transgender student, filed a lawsuit after his school board changed district policy in reaction to some parents’ complaints, barring him from using the boys’ restroom. A federal district court dismissed his claim, but the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals reversed that ruling and ordered the district court to continue hearing the case. Grimm brought his suit under Title IX of the Civil Rights Act, which prohibits discrimination based on sex.”

Read the full press release here.

ABA seeking nominations for Harrison Tweed Award

The ABA Standing Committee on Legal Aid and Indigent Defendants & The National Legal Aid and Defender Association invite nominations for the 2017 Harrison Tweed Award. The Harrison Tweed Award was created in 1956 to recognize the extraordinary achievements of state and local bar associations that develop or significantly expand projects or programs to increase access to civil legal services for persons living in poverty or criminal defense services for indigents. The award, given annually by the ABA Standing Committee on Legal Aid and Indigent Defendants and the National Legal Aid and Defender Association, is presented during the ABA Annual Meeting at a joint meeting of the National Conference of Bar Presidents, National Association of Bar Executives and National Conference of Bar Foundations.

Read more and nominate here.

Don’t Miss the EJW Career Fair Applications & Registration Deadline; New Report on Access to Justice for LEP Persons; Diverse Women Mentors Needed; New Legal Resource Guide for Vets and How Being Poor Makes for Bad Decisions

Attention 2Ls & 3Ls! Important Reminder: Registration & Application Deadline for Equal Justice Works Career Fair & Conference Extended to Monday 9/16

EJW conferenceThe deadline to register and apply to available positions for the Equal Justice Works 2013 Conference and Career Fair has been extended to Monday, September 16 at 5 p.m. EST. 

There are now more than 1,000 openings available for more than 180 job and internship positions posted on the Career Fair database.
While the deadline to apply has been extended, we recommend registering and submitting all applications as soon as possible to avoid last minute traffic which may slow down the system.
Review our guide for instructions on navigating our system.
MORE EVENT DETAILS

FUNDING YOUR TRIP TO DC

Once again this fall UW Law through the Center for Public Service Law will be able to provide travel support for a limited number of UW Law students to attend the EJW Conference and Career Fair in October.

The time frame to apply for travel reimbursement is between September 23 and October 4 (at noon). You may request travel reimbursement (stipends will range from $400-$450 for reimbursement only) by sending your statement of interest and need along with your updated résumé to Assistant Dean Michele Storms at mestorms@uw.edu by noon Friday October 4.  Priority will be given to students who have been granted interviews at the career fair (students will be notified by October 3) but if you are serious about attending and do not have an interview you should still apply.  Please note that the deadline to apply for interviews at the career fair is September 16. Please do not apply for travel reimbursement until September 23.  Reimbursement award decisions will be made by noon October 8.

For students attending the fair, regardless of interview status we’re having a lunch time session on how to make the best use of the conference and career fair.  That session will take place Friday October 21 at 12:30 location TBA.

TIMELINE

August 13- September 16: Student and recent graduate registration and application (App deadline has been extended!)

September 13- October 11: Student and recent graduate registration (for those not applying or seeking an interview)

September 19- October 3: Employer application review and interview selection

September 19- October 8: Student and recent graduate accept/decline interview invitations

New Report Released on Access to the Courts for Persons with Limited English Proficiency

NCSCThe National Center for State Courts just released a comprehensive report and action plan to improve court systems for people with limited Engligh proficiency. Here’s an excerpt:

In our state courts today, the extent of the need for language interpretation services is staggering. Between 1990 and 2010, the number of LEP individuals in the United States grew by 80%, which represents 25.2 million people or 9% of the total U.S. population.  Those numbers are expected to continue to grow. In light of this, dramatic and comprehensive action must be taken. For individuals to be afforded equal justice, and for courts to achieve their mission of providing equal justice accessible to all, court systems must develop viable systems to provide competent interpretation services to limited and non-English speakers.

Read the full report here.

The Seattle Girls School Seeking Diverse Women for Volunteer Mentoring

sgs_logoThe Seattle Girls School is looking for mentors for this school year! The goal of the Mentor Program is to make our students “strong from the inside out” by building a village around each girl. SGS has a student population of 85 girls and we are looking for a diverse group of women mentors to match with our girls.

We welcome mentors from any race, religion, sexual orientation, national or ethnic origin. In particular we are looking for women of color to match with girls of color. The unique experiences and insights that each student will gain by having a mentor will enhance her education at SGS and be a rewarding growth experience for each mentor as well.

We ask mentors to make a twice a month commitment of in person time with their mentee from November to June. There are many ways to be involved in a mentee’s life like coming to the school for lunch, attending a class culmination or bringing your mentee to work. SGS organizes and hosts once a month activities for all involved in the program like climbing, ice skating, volunteering and more.

Click here for the online application or email Betty Lundquist or call 206.709.2228 Ext. 1900 for more information.

Washington Attorney General Ferguson  Unveils New Legal Resource Guide for Veterans and Military Personnel

Bob Ferguson AGO logoWashington State Attorney General Bob Ferguson this week announced a new “Military and Veterans Legal Resource Guide” to help veterans, military personnel and their families understand their legal rights and protections.

“Coming from a family of veterans, I know how important it is to honor the service of our brave men and women in the Armed Forces by making sure they have the support and resources they need,” said Attorney General Bob Ferguson. “This new resource guide is an example of how the Attorney General’s Office can work with other organizations to help veterans and military personnel access the unique rights and protections available to them under the law.”

With approximately 640,000 veteran residents, Washington State has the 12th largest veteran population in the United States.  Washington is also home to a number of major military installations, such as Joint Base Lewis–McChord, Fairchild Air Force Base, Naval Base Kitsap, and Naval Air Station Whidbey Island. Between active duty military personnel and members of the National Guard and Reserve, there are about 62,000 service members in Washington. Taken together, veterans and military personnel account for more than 10 percent of Washington’s total population.

To access the free guide please click here.

Bad Decisions Don’t Make You Poor. Being Poor Makes for Bad Decisions.

clipping couponsNew research shows that worrying about money causes cognitive impairments.

By , Slate.com, Updated Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2013, at 2:04 PM

How much money do I waste in a given month by doing most of my grocery shopping at the Whole Foods that’s directly on my route home rather than taking the three-minute detour to Safeway? I have no idea. As a business writer, I’m aware that the Whole Foods markup is big on some items and small on others. I know that it sometimes reflects genuinely higher quality and sometimes doesn’t. But in my actual life as a person who shops, the main thing is that I prefer Safeway’s flour tortillas, so I go there if and only if I want to buy some flour tortillas. Otherwise, convenience is king. All I really need to know is that my grocery spending is within my budget, and even though I’m probably wasting money, it’s not worth the time and hassle to think about it too much.

Such are the privileges of affluence. It’s not just that you can afford nicer stuff than poor people or have a greater ability to spend money for the sake of convenience. You get to take advantage of what is, in some ways, the greatest convenience of all—the convenience that comes from not having to sweat the small stuff.

study published last week in the journal Science shows that the stress of worrying about finances can impair cognitive functions in a meaningful way. The authors gathered evidence from both low-income Americans (at a New Jersey shopping mall) and the global poor (looking at farmers in Tamil Nadu, India) and found that just contemplating a projected financial decision impacted performance on spatial and reasoning tests.

Among Americans, they found that low-income people asked to ponder an expensive car repair did worse on cognitive-function tests than low-income people asked to consider cheaper repairs or than higher-income people faced with either scenario. To study the global poor, the researchers looked at performance on cognitive tests before and after the harvest among sugarcane farmers. Since it’s a cash crop rather than a food one, the harvest signals a change in financial security but not a nutritional one. They found that the more secure postharvest farmers performed better than the more anxious preharvest ones. Continue reading here.