Want to Learn More about Prison Reform and Immigration Detention? Check Out the Lunch Events This Week!

November 2: End It, Don’t Mend It!: Abolition & the Mainstreaming of Prison and Police Reform

Date: Monday, Nov. 2, 2015
Time: 12:30 – 1:20 PM
Location: William H. Gates Hall, RM 127 unless otherwise noted

IMAP Event Flyer

November 3 & 10: Two-Part Social Justice Tuesday Presentations – Resistance to Immigration Detention: From the Local to the National

SJT

Date: Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2015; Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2015
Time: 12:30 – 1:20 PM
Location: William H. Gates Hall, RM 127 unless otherwise noted

In the absence of effective immigration reform, the federal government’s use of detention as an immigration enforcement strategy has increased exponentially.  To keep up with the national quota that requires Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to maintain no less than 34,000 immigration detention beds at all times, immigrants, including lawful permanent residents and asylum seekers, are detained for months and sometimes years. Conditions of confinement in immigration detention facilities are deplorable and yet there are no enforceable regulations that govern management of the detention facilities.  Without access to affordable legal services, conditions of confinement often go unaddressed and immigrant detainees remain particularly vulnerable.  While detained individuals and their families suffer greatly, the private prison industry that contracts with the government to oversee immigration detention facilities are using “guaranteed minimum” contract provisions to maintain profits whether the beds are filled or not.  This contract scheme safeguards profits for private companies while incentivizing the incarceration of immigrants. Problematic partnerships between ICE and local law enforcement only exacerbate the problem, leading to the transfer of immigrants from jails and prisons to immigration detention centers.

Our two-part Social Justice Tuesday Presentations will address the proliferation of immigration detention and showcase stories and strategies of resistance and defiance both locally and nationally.

Tuesday, Nov. 3rd:  Panel 1:  The Problem and The Local Response:
The first panel will help frame our discussion and bring the problem to life. The panel will highlight immigrant activists who were on the front lines of the hunger strikes at the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma.  Their experiences and insights will lay the foundation a legal advocate from the ACLU of Washington to examine the role of lawyers in the detention resistance efforts.  The panel will conclude with the perspective of a community organizer who is engaged in fighting against the privatization of prisons.

Maru Mora Villalpando, Latino Advocacy /Northwest Detention Center Resistance
Maru Mora Villalpando is a bilingual community organizer, consultant and political analyst with more than 10 years of experience working on immigrant rights and racial justice issues. She is the founder of Latino Advocacy Inc. which provides consulting for non-profits in the areas of policy and membership development, workshops and meetings facilitation.

Margaret Chen, ACLU of Washington
Margaret Chen is a Staff Attorney at the ACLU of Washington  She was one of the attorneys that sought a Temporary Restraining Order (TRO) to prohibit U.S. Immigration and Enforcement (ICE) from retaliating against immigration detainees who engage in First Amendment-protected activities by placing them in solitary confinement.  The lawsuit grew out of events at the Northwest Detention Center (NWDC) in Tacoma, Washington.  Several hundred detainees at (NWDC) initiated a hunger strike to express concerns with national immigration policy and to raise awareness about the conditions of their confinement.  In response, ICE began placing individuals in solitary confinement in retaliation for their support of the hunger strikes.

Andrea Lopez-Diaz, Community Organizer, Ending the Prison Industrial Complex/YUIR
Andrea Lopez-Diaz is a community organizer whose woks focuses on prison reform issues in Washington state.

If you would like lunch please RSVP via Symplicity or gatespsl@uw.edu RSVP by 12:00 pm Monday, November 2.

November 12: Fania Davis – Understanding the Intersection of Restorative and Racial Justice

Fania Davis Flyer

Date: Thursday, Nov. 12, 2015
Time: 6:30 PM
Location: Langston Hughes Performing Arts Institute, 104 17th Ave. S., Seattle, WA 98144

FREE ENTRY.  Join us for a casual reception starting at 5:30 PM.  Light refreshments will be served.

Fania Davis is a founder and current Director of RJOY (Restorative Justice for Oakland Youth). She has been active for many decades in the civil rights, Black liberation, women’s, prisoners’, peace, anti-racial violence and anti-apartheid movements.

Founded in 2005, RJOY focuses on reducing racial disparities by promoting restorative approaches that engage families, communities, and systems. Beginning in 2007, RJOY’s West Oakland Middle School pilot project eliminated violence and expulsions, and reduced suspension rates by 87%.

For more information, click here.


December 10 – 13: Early Bird Rates Ends November 6! Register Now for Conference on Advancing Human Rights 2015 – Sharpening Our Vision, Reclaiming Our Dreams

 

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Date: Thursday, Dec. 10, 2015 – Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015
Time: 5:00 AM EST – 5:00 AM EST
Location: Hilton Austin, 500 E. 4th St., Austin, TX 78701

This year’s conference theme is Sharpening our Vision, Reclaiming our Dreams. This theme reflects the deep need to re-center an economic, social and cultural rights (ESCR) agenda as a key component of our movement work. Building off of Martin Luther King, Jr’s Poor People’s Campaign and his understanding that an end to racial oppression requires addressing poverty and all human rights, we seek to re-affirm and elevate the link between inequality, violence, and the criminalization of economically and politically marginalized groups. Effective human rights movement building demands an intersectional approach in which equal attention is given to the role and impact of race, gender and gender identity, economic and social class, sexuality, disability, age, immigration status and other dimensions of our lives.

For more information, click here.

January 15: Save the Date! King County Bar Association Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Annual Luncheon

KCBA 2016 Luncheon Banner

Date: Friday, Jan. 15, 2015
Time: 12:00 PM
Location: Seattle Sheraton Hotel, 1400 Sixth Ave., Seattle, WA

Keynote Speaker: 

C.T. Vivian

Additional Information about C.T. Vivian

  • Legendary Civil Rights Activist
  • Presidential Civil Rights Advisor
  • Founder, C.T. Vivian Leadership Institute

Please join us on January 15 to honor and celebrate Dr. King’s birthday and his legacy.

Questions, please call the KCBA CLE & Events Department at 206.267.7067.

Extra! Extra! UW Law In-House Pro Bono Program Still Accepting Applications!

Want Direct Client Experience and Make a Difference? Applications Now Being Accepted for Bridging the Gap/Moderate Means Program- Due 10/19

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Bridging the Gap provides legal referrals for low and moderate income individuals as a part of the WSBA Moderate Means Program.

Bridging the Gap is a UW Law in-house pro bono program. The goal of the program is to increase access to civil legal services for people of moderate means who cannot afford an attorney but make too much money to qualify for traditional free legal aid services. The program is focused in the areas of Family, Housing and Consumer law.

Law students serving as Bridging the Gap volunteer interns interview potential clients by telephone to collect information and evaluate their cases. Qualifying cases will be referred by interns to participating attorneys who have agreed to represent clients for a reduced fee. After completing training, Bridging the Gap interns will be expected to commit to a minimum of five hours a week for the duration of fall and winter quarters (one hour is a weekly staff meeting).

Benefits to students:

  • Hands-on experience interviewing clients;
  • Training in substantive legal issues, issue-spotting, interviewing skills and ethics;
  • Instruction on how to use the Legal Server database, which is used by most of the civil legal aid organizations in Washington State, and many other states;
  • Supervision and mentoring by experienced attorneys;
  • The satisfaction of helping low and moderate income individuals who otherwise might not receive any legal help at all;
  • Time spent volunteering for Bridging the Gap counts for recognition with the Pro Bono Honors Society.

Upper level students (2L, 3L and LLM) may participate in training for the program now (fall quarter) and begin interviewing clients in November. 1Ls can train now and begin interviewing clients in January.

To apply for the program, submit a letter of interest and resume to Ann Spangler at spangler@uw.edu by October 19, 2015.

Check Out the Race & Equity Initiative Here at the UW!

September 29: Social Justice Tuesday – What I Did Last Summer in Public Service Law

SJT

Date: Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2015
Time: 12:30 – 1:20 PM
Location: William H. Gates Hall RM 127

Student Panel:
• 2L Zoe Wong, California Department of Justice, Natural Resources Division
• 3L Wyatt Gjullin, Center for Constitutional Rights & Earth Rights International
• 2L Josh Pazderka, Seattle Community Law Center

Learn about public service “real world” experiences from students who have experienced it firsthand.
• How did they find their jobs?
• How did they fund their summers?
• What did they learn?

If you would like lunch please RSVP via Symplicity or gatespsl@uw.edu RSVP by 12:00 pm Monday, September 28, 2015.

October 2: On DC Careers, Politics and Being White House Advisor – A Conversation with UW Law Alumnus Gaurab Bansal

UW Law

Date: Friday, Oct. 2, 2015
Time: 12:30 – 1:20 PM
Location: William H. Gates Hall, RM 127

Gaurab Bansal serves as Deputy Assistant to the President and Deputy Cabinet Secretary. He helps lead the team that liaises with Cabinet departments and agencies on behalf of the President and the White House. Gaurab’s portfolio includes coordinating implementation of key initiatives across the Administration. Prior to joining the White House, he was deputy chief of staff at the Export-Import Bank of the United States Gaurab served as corporate counsel on President Obama’s 2012- re-election campaign in Chicago. Before that he practiced law with Perkins Coie LLP in both Seattle and Washington, D.C., where he focused on technology startups, venture capital, and business and political law. Gaurab started his career as a public elementary and middle school teacher in Houston. Gaurab is a native of Baltimore and continues to keep his permanent  home in Seattle.

Limited seating luncheon, please RSVP via Symplicity.

October 2: Free CLE on Representing the Pro Bono Client: Advocacy Skills for Administrative Hearings 2015

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Date: Friday, Oct. 2, 2015
Time: 9:00 AM PST
Location: Webcast

CLE Credits: 3.0

This training is designed to help mitigate the crisis faced by low-income families everywhere by providing attorneys with a basic understanding of common issues and strategies in providing pro bono assistance with administrative hearings.  The program will focus on California law, but will also cover many topics such as due process and other rights that apply nationwide; therefore, advocates from other forums would benefit from the information and attending the program.

What You Will Learn

  • An overview of administrative hearings low-income clients most frequently need, involving:
    • State public benefits, including Social Services claims andUnemployment Insurance claims;
    • Federal public benefits, including Supplemental Security Income;
    • Professional licensing, including nursing licenses and Department of Social Services clearance; and
    • Unpaid wages, and other wage and hour-related rights.
  • Best practices and common advocacy strategies and procedures for administrative hearings, including:
    • Obtaining evidence
    • Drafting position statements/hearing briefs
    • Presenting your case at hearing
  • Rehearings and further appeals
  • California law and practice specifics

To register, click here.

October 5: Conference: Access to Information as a Human Right – UW School of Law and Center for Human Rights

Conference Poster

Date: Monday, Oct. 5, 2015
Location: William H. Gates Hall

12:00 pm – 1:30 pm (LAW 115): Access to Information as a Human Right: a conversation with Kate Doyle of the Evidence Project at the National Security Archive. Moderated by Ricardo Gómez, UW Information School. Session full—please RSVP for wait list!

3:00 pm – 4:30 pm (LAW 115): Access to Information as a Tool for Human Rights in El Salvador: a conversation with Salvadoran human rights defenders Mirla Carbajal, lawyer with the Human Rights Institute of the Universidad Centroamericana, and Dina Cabrera, community activist and survivor of the Santa Cruz massacre; and Philippe Bourgois, Professor of Psychiatry and Anthropology at UCLA and survivor of the Santa Cruz massacre. Moderated by Tony Lucero, Chair of Latin America and Caribbean Studies at the UW Jackson School of International Studies.

5:30 pm – 6:30 pm (LAW 115 & Lobby): Evening reception

7:00 pm – 9:00 pm (LAW 138): Keynote address by Baltasar Garzón of the Fundación Internacional Baltasar Garzón, speaking on access to information in international human rights law. Baltasar Garzón is a Spanish jurist responsible for landmark cases which have advanced the principle of universal jurisdiction in international law, including the 1998 indictment of Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet.

The conference is free and open to the public, but space is limited, so please RSVP here to reserve your space.

October 6: Social Justice Tuesday: Pro Bono is for Everyone!

SJT

Date: Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2015
Time: 12:30 – 1:20 PM
Location: William H. Gates Hall RM 127

Why do pro bono? What are the benefits? What are the community needs? How do you integrate pro bono into your busy law practice or even as a busy law student? What are some of the challenges of pro bono work and how do you overcome them? How do you find opportunities? Where can I get training?

Learn the answers to all these questions and so much more from the following distinguished guest speakers:

  • Joanna Plichta Boisen, Foster Pepper PLLC
  • Clay Wilson, Bridging the Gap/Moderate Means Program, UW Law
  • Jacob Witt, King County Pro Bono Services- Housing Justice Project
  • Phoebe Huang, UW Law Class of 2017

October 6: Race & Equity Initiative – Equity and Difference Speaker SeriesUW Logo

Date: Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2015
Time: 7:30 PM
Location: Meany Hall

The Graduate School, in partnership with the UW Alumni Association, is welcoming speakers to campus to share their unique perspectives on race, equity and social justice. The series is a way to pay tribute to and learn from the leaders of the past, and to celebrate the new generation carrying forward the torch of inclusion and activism.

  • Oct. 6, 2015, 7:30 p.m., Meany Hall – An Evening with Harry Belafonte, with Professor Valerie Curtis-Newton
  • Jan. 14, 2016, 7:30 p.m., Kane Hall – Ralina Joseph, associate professor, communications and public lecturer
  • April 5, 2016, 7:30 p.m., Kane Hall – Touré on “Microaggression: Power, Privilege & Everyday Life”

To register, click here.

 

October 6: Jackson School Gathers Experts to Discuss Syrian Humanitarian CrisisUW Logo

Date: Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2015
Time: 7:00 PM
Location: Thomson Hall RM 101

Syria’s drawn-out civil war has displaced more than 10 million people since 2011 and the flood of refugees from the area has drawn the concerned attention of the world.

The University of Washington Jackson School of International Studies will hold a free, public forum at 7 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 6, in Room 101 of Thomson Hall. The forum is titled “Focus on Syria: A Humanitarian Crisis,” and will be moderated by Resat Kasaba, Stanley D. Golub Chair of International Studies and director of the Jackson School.

Panelists for the event are:

  • Jennifer Butte-Dahl, director of the Jackson School’s Master of Arts in Applied International Studies, who volunteered last month with the nonprofit organization Shelterbox on the Greek island of Lesbos (a destination for many refugees arriving by water).
  • Kathie Friedman, Jackson School associate professor whose research interests include forced migrations and refugees.
  • Neil McFarland, M.D., a family physician with UW Medicine who has volunteered in Greece, Jordan and other refugee camps.
  • Mark S.Ward, director of the Syrian Transition Assistance and Response Team at the U.S. Embassy in Ankara, Turkey, who will join the discussion via Skype.

For more information, contact Kristina Bowman, Jackson School communications specialist, at 206-221-1323 or kriscb@uw.edu.

October 16: Free CLE on Prison Law 2015

PLI logo

Date: Friday, Oct. 16, 2015
Time: 9:00 AM EST
Location: Webcast

Prison conditions and prisoner treatment issues are getting unprecedented attention as the nation focuses on the magnitude of the national prison population.  With its sixth Prison Law program, PLI continues its examination of these important issues.  In an area where advocates face increasingly challenging legal issues whether they represent incarcerated people from a public interest practice, private practice or as a policy advocate, and where government lawyers also grapple with complex concerns, PLI’s Prison Law program offers a unique focus on evolving prison law issues.  Experienced faculty will discuss health care, solitary confinement, immigrants, juveniles, rights under the ADA, gender, and barriers to civil litigation filed on behalf of incarcerated people, as well as ethical issues that arise in prison actions.

What You Will Learn:

  • Solitary confinement – legal landscape and analysis
  • Issues of gender
  • Barriers to lawsuits brought on behalf of incarcerated people against individual prison officials and correctional institutions
  • Ethical dilemmas that arise in the course of representing incarcerated people
  • Health issues including mental health issues in prison
  • Issues affecting select populations

To register, click here.

October 21: New Israel Fund presents Safeguarding Democracy and Civil Rights in Israel

Sharon Abraham Weiss

Date: Wednesday, Oct. 21, 2015
Time: 7:00 – 8:30 PM
Location: Hosted by Congregation Beth Shalom, 6800 35th Ave NE, Seattle

A conversation with Sharon Abraham-Weiss, Executive Director of the Association for Civil Rights in Israel, Israel’s oldest and largest civil rights organization

Co-sponsors list information

During last summer’s war, already gaping societal divides in Israel were widened. The Association for Civil Rights in Israel (ACRI), the country’s equivalent of the ACLU, advocated for the protection of vulnerable populations near Gaza and the protection of civil liberties in wartime. ACRI has won legal landmarks before Israel’s Supreme Court such as recognition of same-sex marriages and non-Orthodox conversions from outside Israel, the right of women to become IDF pilots, and safeguarding Africans seeking refuge from genocide.

Sharon Abraham-Weiss, one of Israel’s foremost legal experts and litigators, comes to Seattle to share the vibrancy of Israel’s democratic values at a time when liberal Zionism and Jewish democracy is under question from inside Israel and out.

Sharon Abraham-Weiss is the executive director of the Association for Civil Rights in Israel (ACRI). Previously, she represented ACRI in such landmark cases dealing with family unification, social welfare, and state land distribution. She has also served on the Equal Employment Opportunities Commission of the Ministry of Economy. Ms. Abraham-Weiss is a founding member of Itach-Maaki: Women Lawyers for Social Justice and co-founder of The Hebrew University of Jerusalem’s Breira Center, which coordinates law students volunteering in the community. Ms. Abraham-Weiss holds LL.B. and B.Sc. degrees from The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and an LL.M from Tel Aviv University. She also holds an M.A. in public administration from Harvard Kennedy School, where she was a Wexner Fellow.

The Association for Civil Rights in Israel, established in 1972, is Israel’s oldest and largest human rights organization and the only one dealing with the entire spectrum of human rights and civil liberties issues in Israel. More about ACRI here.

The New Israel Fund is the leading organization committed to equality and democracy for all Israelis. Widely credited with building Israeli progressive civil society, we have provided millions of dollars to more than 850 organizations since our inception in 1979. More about NIF here.

October 21: KIND and Microsoft invite you to a Reception and Panel on the Child Migration Crisis

KIND Event Banner

Date: Wednesday, Oct. 21, 2015
Time: 6:30 – 8:30 PM
Location: Seattle Art Museum, 1300 First Ave., Seattle, WA 98101

On behalf of Kids in Need of Defense (KIND) and Microsoft Corporation, we invite you to join us on October 21st for a reception and a discussion focusing on the dramatic surge in unaccompanied immigrant and refugee children entering the U.S.  We will be joined by Washington State Attorney General Bob Ferguson as we discuss how KIND and its partners in Seattle are providing pro bono representation to growing numbers of vulnerable children.

During the program, we will present a clip from the documentary “La Prenda” (The Pawn) which highlights the pervasive sexual and gender-based violence in Guatemala, and the impunity that allows perpetrators to suffer few, if any, consequences. The film tells the stories of three victims, one of whom was matched by KIND with a pro bono attorney after she fled Guatemala and made her way to the U.S. Astrid was 14 years old when she was drugged, kidnapped, and raped. The film highlights the protection needs of girls escaping this violence and the reasons they must flee to survive.

We look forward to an interesting and informative evening!

To reserve your tickets, click here.

Preliminary Results for the Civil Legal Needs Study Now Available

Mayor Introduces New Legislation Requiring Places of Public Accommodation to Designate All-Gender Restrooms

City of Seattle Logo

By Kathryn Robertson | Seattle.gov

Today Mayor Ed Murray introduced legislation that would require all City-controlled and privately operated places of public accommodation to designate existing or future single-occupant restrooms as all-gender facilities. All existing City-controlled single-occupant restrooms (across all City departments, from City Hall to Parks) will be re-signed to conform to this new standard. The proposal was one that was introduced to the City by the Seattle LGBT Commission as part of its ongoing work, and is one of the early recommendations from the Mayor’s LGBT Task Force.

“The transgender community deserves the dignity and respect that most people take for granted,” said Mayor Ed Murray. “That’s why Seattle is building upon our history of being one of the most welcoming cities in the world by ensuring restrooms are available and safe for all.”

Continue reading here.

Volunteer Opportunity with the Washington Court Reports Commission, Application Deadline 7/9

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The WSBA Board of Governors is accepting letters of interest and résumés from members interested serving a four-year term on the Washington Court Reports Commission. The term begins Aug. 2, 2015, and expires Aug. 1, 2019.

The Washington Court Reports Commission is as an advisory body for the Washington Supreme Court, regarding publication of official opinions from the state’s appellate courts. See RCW 2.32.160. The commission is chaired by Chief Justice Barbara A. Madsen. Additional members include a Supreme Court justice, a Court of Appeals judge, the state reporter of decisions, the state law librarian, the state code reviser, and two representatives from the WSBA. Members are appointed by the chief justice to serve four-year terms.

The commission is involved in issues, such as the periodic awarding of publishing contracts, publication of official opinions in the Washington Reporter series of books, and electronic publication of opinions. The commission usually meets once annually in the summer in Olympia or SeaTac.

The commission would find it particularly helpful for the Bar’s nominee to have an interest and knowledge in technology issues related to electronic publications of official documents.

For more information about the Washington Court Reports Commission contact Rick Neidhardt, Washington State Reporter of Decisions, at 360-357-2090 or Rick.Neidhardt@courts.wa.gov.

Fair Housing Victory 

Supreme Court Courthouse (c) Stockvault

On Thursday, June 25, the Supreme Court ruled that disparate impact can continue to be used as evidence in illegal discrimination cases. Under disparate impact, actions that create discrimination can be found to violate fair housing and fair employment laws, even if those actions do not intend to discriminate. U.S. courts have used disparate impact for decades to assess discrimination charges; the Supreme Court’s ruling means we can continue to take disparate impact into consideration.

Read the full opinion here.

WSBA Board of Governors Accepting Letters of Interest for Judicial Information Systems Committee, Due Tomorrow

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The WSBA Board of Governors is accepting letters of interest and résumés from members interested serving a three-year term on the Judicial Information System Committee (JISC). The term begins Aug. 1, 2015 and expires July 31, 2018.

The JISC is the policy-level steering committee for the court’s automation system. The committee is composed of 12 Bar members, including four members representing each of three areas of the judicial system — appellate court, superior court, and courts of limited jurisdiction. Three at-large committee members from outside the judiciary include a Bar member, a member of the Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs, and a member of the Washington State Association of Prosecuting Attorneys.

Learn more about the JISC or contact Pam Payne, senior administrative assistant, at 360-705-5277 or pamela.payne@courts.wa.gov.

Please submit letters of interest and résumés to: WSBA Communications Department, 1325 Fourth Ave., Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98101-2539, or via email to barleaders@wsba.org.

The Washington Office of Civil Legal Aid Releases Preliminary Results on the 2015 Civil Legal Needs Study

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The Washington State Supreme Court’s Civil Legal Needs Study Update Committee commissioned the Social and Economic Sciences Research Center (SESRC) at Washington State University to conduct a comprehensive update of the 2003 Civil Legal Needs Study.  The survey research was conducted in late 2014.  Publications documenting the research findings are found below.

Continue reading here.

Western States Center Extends Registration for Activists Mobilizing for Power Training 2015

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Western States Center offers training and strategy event at Portland State University in Portland, Oregon.  Workshops run from 10 am to 5 pm with a 2-hour lunch break.  Long lunch breaks are designed to give you a chance to network with other attendees and participate in lunch-time meetings. Space is limited.

To register online, click here.

It’s Official: Choc Full o’ Winter Quarter Events in Our Community!

Tuesday, January 13: Social Justice Tuesday- Consumer Education & Training Services

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 Wednesday, January 14: Criminal Justice Connections Breakfast

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Wednesday, January 14: Free Webinar- Exploring Ethical Challenges of Legal Services Working on Elder Abuse Issues

National Consumer Law Center

Hosted by the National Consumer Law Center

Join us for a webinar on Jan 14, 2015 at 2:00 PM EST.

Register now!

Increasing national focus on elder abuse and a push for greater legal services involvement, particularly in the area of financial exploitation, have led to a number of difficult ethical challenges. This webinar will examine: Ways in which ageist attitudes have shaped states’ elder abuse laws and how these attitudes – often unconscious – affect our approach to elder abuse, especially when clients are of questionable capacity; The critical need to establish and put in place, clear policies/protocols to guide involvement in abuse/exploitation cases and to ensure adherence to professional responsibilities, before legal programs get involved; and applying the policies/protocols and dealing with ethical challenges while working with elders and their families/third parties in the field.

Presenters: Penny Hommel, Co-Director, The Center for Social Gerontology, Jaye Martin, Executive Director, Maine Legal Services for the Elderly and Denis Culley, Staff Attorney, Maine Legal Services for the Elderly  Additional sponsorship for this Webinar is provided by a grant from the Administration on Aging/Administration for Community Living. This webinar is part of a series of National Elder Rights Training Project webinars for the National Legal Resource Center.  There is no charge for this webinar. All time listings are in Eastern Time. If you have any questions email trainings@nclc.org

Wednesday, January 14, 3:30-5:30pm, Room 138- Race, Immigration & Citizenship

Race Immigration and Citizenship, January 14

Friday, January 16: Meet & Greet-Sherrilyn Ifill

Sherrilyn Ifill

Friday, January 16: The Architecture of Human Rights- Why Constitutional Government Requires Human Rights Law

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The CLASS Center, UW Center for Human Rights and the UW School of Law cordially invite you to

Professor Jamie Mayerfeld’s Book Manuscript Discussion

The Architecture of Human Rights:  Why Constitutional Government Requires International Human Rights Law

Friday, January 16th, 3:30-5:30pm
William Gates Hall 447

Light refreshments will be served

Please join us for a productive and intellectually stimulating discussion of Professor Mayerfeld’s book manuscript as he finalizes it for publication. The session will consist of feedback from four faculty discussants followed by a robust discussion by all in attendance.

The manuscript can be located via the following link. Likewise, acknowledging busy schedules, Professor Mayerfeld has also produced a Memo to guide your reading if you would like to focus on a portion of the manuscript.

Don’t Miss Out! February 6 & 7: NW Public Service Career Fair

NW PS Career Fair LogoFor twenty-five years, the NW Public Service Career Fair has linked law students and alumni with opportunities to make a difference.  We typically have more than 50 non-profits & government offices and more than 500 students & alumni from our 11 schools participating in the fairs. Help today’s clients and inspire tomorrow’s justice seekers.

When? Seattle- Friday, February 6. Portland- Saturday, February 7th.

10:00 to 10:30 Student & Employer Check-in
10:30 to Noon Table Talk
12:40 to 5:00 Pre-scheduled Interviews

Where?

In Seattle: LeRoux in the Student Center at Seattle University Seattle University Campus & Parking Map

In Portland: Templeton Center at Lewis & Clark CollegeLewis & Clark Campus & Parking MapPio Express free downtown shuttle bus

Registration costs? $15 for one fair or $25 for both.

Which employers will be there? Employers are registering on a rolling basis through January 12. Check out the employers registered at the Seattle fair here and the Portland fair here.

How do I get a pre-scheduled interview at the fair? Monday, January 19 is the deadline for submitting application materials.

Where can I get more info? Check out the career fair home page here!

Welcome to 2015 Events!

Tuesday, January 6, 12:00-1:30, Downtown- Police Militarization & Police Misconduct

normstamper

The WSAJ Civil Rights Section Brown Bag Meeting presents…

Police Militarization & Police Misconduct, Keynote Speaker Norm Stamper, Former Seattle Police Chief (1994-2000)

Norman Stamper began his career as a beat cop in San Diego in 1966. Norman is a long-time advocate for police reform, and the author of “Breaking Rank – A Top Cop’s Exposé of the Dark Side of American Policing.”

Plaza 600 Conference Room, 600 Stewart St. Room 205. RSVP: Jeanne@washingtonjustice.org

Wednesday, January 7, 12:30-1:20, Room 127- Career Building Wednesdays- Public Service Summer Funding

2015 PS Summer Funding Flyer

Wednesday, January 14, 3:30-5:30pm, Room 138- Race, Immigration & Citizenship

Race Immigration and Citizenship, January 14

 

 

Interested in Working for the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights? Applications Open Now for 2015 Fellowship!

National Immigration Forum Seeking Policy and Advocacy Intern in Washington DC

National Immigration Forum Logo

We are hiring interns to assist us with research, analysis, drafting of written materials, and monitoring activities of the executive and legislative branches of government on immigration issues. The National Immigration Forum advocates for the value of immigrants and immigration to the nation.  For over 30 years, the Forum has worked to advance sound federal immigration solutions through its policy expertise, communications outreach and coalition building work, which forges powerful alliances of diverse constituencies across the country to build consensus on the important role of immigrants in America.

For a complete job description and application details, click here.

Inter-American Commission on Human Rights Offering 2015 Romulo Gallegos Fellowship, Due 10/29

The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights is pleased to inform about the launching of a new automatized system to apply for fellowships, which as of today is the only means of presenting applications. The goal of this new digital system is to facilitate and streamline processes, to the benefit of all involved parties.

The Commission appreciates the cooperation and support of all users in the current process of modernization and digitalization of our systems.

For more information about the fellowship, click here.  Deadline 10/29.

Poverty & Race Research Action Council Seeking 2014-2015 Housing Fellow, Due 10/31

PRRAC

At the present time, PRRAC’s work is focused in the areas of housing, education, environmental justice, and domestic human rights, with a particular emphasis on the continuing consequences of historical patterns of housing segregation and development.

In addition to national-level law and policy research and advocacy, we are engaged in local technical assistance work in Baltimore and Hartford, in support of regional desegregation cases filed by the NAACP Legal Defense Fund and the ACLU. PRRAC is also working to support the development of a regional housing mobility program in the Philadelphia area.

The incoming Fellow will focus on our housing, community development, and environmental justice portfolios. The position is based in Washington, D.C. , and the fellowship term will run through summer 2015 (beginning and end dates negotiable).

For a complete job description and application instructions, click here.

Environmental Law Foundation Seeking Summer 2015 Legal Intern in Oakland, CA

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ELF is looking for one or more legal interns to work on a full-time basis during the summer of 2015. We highly value interns’ contributions and we are looking for someone who is ready to produce legal work at a high level.

ELF’s legal interns will assist in all aspects of litigation on our docket. Generally, the interns will be conducting legal research and drafting memos, briefs, discovery and/or pleadings. To the extent feasible, the interns will also attend hearings and settlement meetings. The interns will work closely with a staff attorney who will supervise their work and provide feedback. Because of our small size and fast-paced environment, interns will be heavily involved in all aspects of our work, from strategy meetings to brief writing. We are proud that we can offer interns the opportunity to do real, substantive, important work.

For a complete job description and application details, click here.

Attention Rising 2Ls and 3Ls! Spitzer Internship Program Now Accepting Applications

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The National Health Law Program (NHeLP) is excited to accept applications for the Spitzer Summer Internship Program in honor of immediate past Executive Director Emily Spitzer. NHeLP seeks up to three law students to participate in the program, with the paid positions divided among offices in Washington, DC, Carrboro, NC, and Los Angeles, CA.

Potential Spitzer interns are rising 2L or 3L students, with a proven and demonstrated commitment to social justice and an interest in working toward the expansion and protection of health care access for low-income and underserved populations.

Spitzer interns will work closely with NHeLP staff attorneys, who work collaboratively across offices and engage in the primary work of the organization–providing high-quality advice and support to state-based health lawyers, administration officials, and policymakers.

For more information, click here.

Urban Justice Center Seeking Summer 2015 Legal Intern in Community Development Project, Due 1/9/15

UJC

The Community Development Project (CDP) of the Urban Justice Center (UJC) seeks law student interns who are interested in working with us during the Summer of 2015 to protect the rights of low-income individuals and provide legal, technical and research assistance to grassroots community organizations working on various social justice issues. The main types of substantive areas in which we work include:  housing; workers’ rights; consumer justice; and transactional legal services (e.g. legal help for community organizations and worker cooperatives). By providing legal support in these substantive areas, our mission is to advance community groups’ campaigns for social and economic justice.

For a complete job description and application details, click here.

Hadsell Stormer & Renick LLP Seeking Summer 2015 Law Clerk, Applications Accepted on Rolling Basis Through 1/30/15

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Hadsell Stormer & Renick LLP is currently accepting applications for law clerk positions in Summer 2015.

Job duties will entail researching and drafting legal memoranda and briefs, participating in meetings with clients and attorneys, developing prospective cases, and attending depositions, hearings, and mediations.

The ideal candidate will possess a demonstrated commitment to work in public interest law, have strong research and writing skills, and will be in their second year of law school.

For a complete job description and application details, click here.