Civil Rights Lawyers, Radical Movements of the 1960s Podcast, Juvenile Law Center Report, QLaw Judge’s Bench Guide

Civil rights lawyers from the 1960s have lessons for today’s social activistsHong Kong Protests

“When Stephen Bingham and Timothy Jenkins remember traveling to Mississippi in 1964 to take part in the Freedom Summer, with the stated goal of registering African-Americans to vote, they recall being exhilarated. It was an exciting time for the civil rights movement and the two—along with thousands of other volunteers from the NAACP, Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Congress of Racial Equality, Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and the rest of the rich alphabet soup that is part of historical lore—felt energized and inspired by the hurly-burly of protests, marches, demonstrations and organized political activities that made them feel as if they were helping to bring about important social change.

They also remembered being terrified.”

Read more here.

Podcast: How the radical movements of the 1960s changed the law and challenged the status quoSolidarity USAS

“In this episode of Asked and Answered, the ABA Journal’s Victor Li speaks with attorney and activist Paul Harris about his work stretching back to the 1960s. Harris, one of the radical “movement lawyers” featured in the cover story for the August issue of the ABA Journal, talks about his work defending high-profile clients like Huey Newton, Leonard McNeil and others.

Harris also discusses the current political landscape and what today’s generation of aspiring movement lawyers can learn from their predecessors.”

More information here.

Juvenile Law Center Report:  Making a Truly Healthy Transition to Adulthood Relies on a Strong Medicaid Program and Our Commitment to Enhance Access to Quality Care

“Unlocking Potential: The Strength of Our Stories as the Key to Child Welfare Reform was released in July 2017. It is the Congressional Coalition on Adoption Institute 2017 Foster Youth Internship Program Report and contains 12 recommendations for reforming the child welfare system. The Chronicle of Social Change has been spotlighting each of the 12 recommendations and providing commentary. The 12 recommendations are excellent and present policy responses that reflect the insight and experiences of youth who have been in foster care. Because of the continued activity around the federal health care law—and its importance to the health and well-being of current and former youth in foster care—we wanted to provide a special highlight on Justin Abbasi’s recommendation related to access to behavioral health services and the Chronicle’s commentary.”

Read more here.

The LGBT Bar Association of Washington: QLaw is happy to share the news that the Judges’ Bench Guide is here!

QLaw LogoThe Judges’ Bench Guide on the LGBTQ Community and the Law is a resource of judges, lawyers, the legal community, and anyone else who would like to learn more about some of the legal issues affecting the LGBTQ community.  The guide was prepared to QLaw Fioundation and QLaw Association for the Washington State Supreme Courts Gender and Justice Commission.

More information here.

First Amendment and Media Law Diversity Moot Court Competition, Washington Leadership Institute open for applications, and more!

Due September 11:  The Tenth Annual First Amendment and Media Law Diversity Moot Court Competition

Gavel

Application Due:  Monday, September 11, 2017

This annual First Amendment and Media Law Diversity Moot Court, now in its tenth year, is designed to introduce minority law students to the practice of media law and to many of the lawyers who are active in the media law bar.

The team with the highest score for the final round of oral arguments will be the winner of the Competition. Each member of the winning team will receive $750. The finalist with the highest score for the final round of oral argument will be deemed “Best Oralist” and will receive $1,500. All students who attend the Annual Conference will have the opportunity to network with practicing media law attorneys from across the country and attend engaging and informative panels.

The ABA Forum on Communications Law invites qualified law students to apply to participate in the Tenth Annual First Amendment and Media Law Diversity Moot Court Competition. Final deadline to apply is Midnight, EDT, Monday, September 11, 2017

Learn more and apply here.

Due September 15: Washington Leadership Institute (WLI) Is Now Accepting Applications

Applications Due: Friday, September 15, 2017

The mission of the Washington Leadership Institute (WLI) is to recruit, train, and develop minority and traditionally underrepresented attorneys for future leadership positions in the Washington State Bar Association and legal community. The WLI is accepting application for the 2018 institute. Applications are due by September 15, 2017.

Learn more and apply here.

The International Trademark Association’s (INTA) Pro Bono Clearinghouse has officially opened to potential clients facing trademark issues in the US and Germany.Networking Image

“The clearinghouse had a pilot soft start on 1 January. In its current form, the clearinghouse offers a host of practitioners in the US and Germany that can help with trademark issues. Eligible clients will be matched with an INTA attorney to help guide them. The intended clients are low-income individuals and directors of non-profit or charitable organizations with low operating budgets that have no other option or don’t have access to legal advice in trademarks.”

Read more here.

Match site launches for progressive lawyers and non-profits

“President Donald Trump has inspired a new online dating service-between lawyers seeking pro-bono work and opposition non-profits in need of help. We the Action,   launching Friday, will be an online portal to connect lawyers with legal work waiting to be done, from reviewing leases and contracts to filing Social Security claims to potentially heading to court in immigration cases. Non-profits will be able to post the services they need, and search through online profiles created by attorneys detailing expertise and availability.”

Read more here.

Education Department delivers a troubling message about its loan forgiveness programImg fr. Oregon Courts: Signature

“In court documents filed late Monday, the federal agency reaffirmed earlier statements that borrowers could not rely on FedLoan Servicing, the company overseeing the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program, to accurately say whether they qualify for debt relief. The department’s position signals that there are no guarantees of loan forgiveness for people who have received assurances from the servicing company, a troubling realization for the hundreds of thousands of people participating in the program.” “‘Though the department’s contractor has made occasional errors in individual notifications to borrowers, it has corrected those errors,’ Education Department attorneys wrote in Monday’s filing.’Moreover, it has provided borrowers … ample opportunities to seek reconsideration of its decisions.’ The attorneys said the final decision on forgiveness is, and has always been, in the hands of the Education Department. That means borrowers will know for sure that their loans will be forgiven only after they have completed the 10 years of payments.”

Read more here.

New Legal Aid Pilot to Prevent Evictions; Gates Scholars Getting Things Done!; Federal Judge Orders Immediate Removal of Unconstitutional Immigration Hold

Launch of Legal Aid Pilot to Prevent Housing Evictions

Council member Lisa Herbold (District 1, West Seattle and South Park) celebrated news that a full complement of attorneys has been hired to implement a new City-sponsored legal aid pilot program created to prevent people from losing their housing when they are in the midst of a legal defense for an unrelated offense.  The creation of this pilot will allow new civic legal aid attorneys to partner with Public Defenders to advocate for the accused to keep their housing during the legal review and plea bargaining processes.

Read more here.

Gates Public Service Law Scholar Martina Kartman selected for 2017 Soros Justice Fellowship!

“The Open Society Foundations are pleased to announce the 2017 class of Soros Justice Fellows, a dynamic mix of attorneys, advocates, artists, writers, and scholars who bring fresh ideas and energy to the challenge of maintaining past gains and continuing to push for progress toward a more humane criminal justice system in the United States.

Working in 11 states across the country, the 23 fellows seek to address the country’s overly punitive approach to crime, develop effective responses to both interpersonal and police violence, and challenge the ways in which the effects of incarceration linger long after someone has been released from prison. Included in this group is the inaugural cohort of Soros Justice “Youth Activist” Fellows—seven people between the ages of 18 and 25 who are just beginning their careers and who show real promise to develop into social justice leaders and innovators.

Martina Kartman will support communities impacted by the criminal legal system, addressing the harms associated with interpersonal and state violence, and pushing for alternatives to punitive sentencing.”

Read more here.

New York Times, Letter to the Editor, “Criminal Justice Reform in Louisiana,” by Gates Public Service Law Scholar Theo Shaw!Scales of Justice

“The bill signed by the governor is a step in the right direction. But too many people are still suffering in this oppressive criminal system, mainly because of lack of quality legal representation.

People faced with a loss of liberty are entitled to more. Fifty years ago, the Supreme Court said the ideal that every person stands equal before the law cannot be realized if a poor person has to face his accusers without a lawyer to assist him.”

Read more here.

Federal Judge Orders Immediate Removal of Unconstitutional Immigration Hold

“A federal district court judge in eastern Washington ruled yesterday that Yakima County must immediately remove an immigration hold on an individual which prevents him from posting bail, thus violating his Fourth Amendment right to be free from unreasonable seizures. The Court found that the County had no authority to place an immigration hold against persons based on a civil immigration “warrant” — an administrative form issued by federal immigration officers. In an oral ruling after a lengthy hearing in Spokane, Judge Salvador Mendoza, Jr. emphasized that the Fourth Amendment requires that an arrest warrant must be approved by a neutral and detached judge – not by an employee of the executive branch.

The ruling has wide implications as similar policies are in effect across the nation.”

Read more here.

Opportunity to Serve on WSBA’s Civil Litigation Rules TaskforceWSBA Logo

The Washington State Bar Association is seeking a lawyer with experience litigating in Superior and/or District Court in Washington to serve on a rule-drafting Task Force, to replace a member who had to resign. The Task Force was created by Bar’s  Board of Governors in November 2016 to draft amendments to the Washington Civil Rules for eventual submission to the Supreme Court. The Board of Governors established the Task Force after considering and voting on some of the recommendations submitted by an earlier group, the Escalating Costs of Civil Litigation Task Force (ECCL).

If interested in serving, please send a resume and cover letter explaining why you are interested to Kevin Bank,WSBA Assistant General Counsel at kevinb@wsba.org. Applications must be submitted as soon as possible but no later than August 31, 2018.  More information on the Task Force can be found here.

Public Service Loan Forgiveness, Disability Rights Washington report on abuse and neglect of people with developmental disabilities, and Iowa Supreme Court “Access to Justice Commission” Report

Equal Justice Works: “How Loan Servicers are Derailing Public Service Loan Forgiveness.”

“While Congress and the Trump Administration continue to work towards a budget that may eliminate the Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) program, many loan borrowers are facing issues with the loan servicers that are supposed to help them navigate a complex program.”

Read more here.

Disability Rights Washington-“No Excuses: Shining a light on abuse and neglect of people with developmental disabilities in Washington’s institutions.”

“No Excuses” sheds light on the pattern of unsafe conditions and lack of treatment in Washington’s Residential Habilitation Centers (RHCs), as identified in the State’s own surveys. While most of this information is publicly available, it is apparent that the ongoing problems are not widely known nor discussed. This report synthesizes a single year’s worth of information to call attention to the serious harm that continues to occur. These systemic failures endanger people with developmental disabilities in all of the RHCs and cannot continue, as there are no excuses for these failures.

Read more here.

The Iowa Supreme Court’s “Access to Justice Commission” ReportScales of Justice

“The Iowa Supreme Court’s ‘Access to Justice Commission’ has released a report that outlines steps to remove barriers to civil justice for low-income and disadvantaged Iowans.” “The report identifies dozens of recommendations and goals. They include recruiting more rural lawyers, creating a veterans legal clinic and developing an app to help people navigate legal issues and resources. The report also suggests ways to encourage the corporate community in volunteering and charitable giving around access-to-justice issues.”

Read more here.

OCLA, Seattle City Attorney OCI, DOJ Honors Program, and much more!

Due August 31: Opportunity for Service: Civil Legal Aid Oversight CommitteeOCLA Logo

Application Deadline: Thursday, August 31, 2017

The Access to Justice Board seeks letters of interest from individuals interested in being considered for appointment by the Washington Supreme Court to the Civil Legal Aid Oversight Committee. The Oversight Committee is responsible for overseeing the activities of the Office of Civil Legal Aid (OCLA), reviewing the performance of the OCLA Director and making recommendations to the Legislature, the Supreme Court and the Access to Justice Board on matters relating to the delivery of state-funded civil legal aid services.  There are two open positions on the Civil Legal Aid Oversight Committee for which letters of interest are invited.  The application deadline has been extended and applications must be received no later than 5:00 p.m. on August 31, 2017.

Read more and apply here.

Due July 24 at noon:  OCI: Seattle City Attorney, Criminal Division InternshipsCity of Seattle Logo

Application Deadline:  Monday, July 24, 2017 at noon.

The Criminal Division represents the City in prosecuting traffic infractions, misdemeanors, and gross misdemeanors in Seattle Municipal Court. The types of cases prosecuted by the Criminal Division include driving under the influence, traffic infractions, domestic violence, theft, assault, and trespassing.

There are a limited number of each criminal prosecution and infraction prosecution positions available for fall and winter 2017 and spring and summer 2018.  (Please note that offers will be extended for either criminal or infraction prosecution—not a combination.) All positions are unpaid. The ideal candidates will be available for court coverage three or four days per week

For complete job description go to Symplicity and apply here.

Attorney General’s Summer Law Intern Program at the U.S. Department of Justice. Honors Program (HP) and Summer Law Intern Program (SLIP) application opens on Monday, July 31, 2017.DOJ - Attorney's Office

You are invited to attend a webinar on:

THE ATTORNEY GENERAL’S HONORS PROGRAM AND SUMMER LAW INTERN PROGRAM AT THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

Hosted by: Rena J. Cervoni, Deputy Director and Trisha A. Fillbach, Assistant Director of the Office of Attorney Recruitment and Management

During the webinars, participants will:
• Obtain a brief overview of this year’s programs;
• Receive answers to questions about the application; and
• Gain an understanding of the hiring timeline.

Please RSVP to OARMposition@usdoj.gov for one session (listed below) by Wednesday, July 19, 2017. Please include your name, law school, and the webinar date you choose to attend.

Tuesday, July 25, 2017, 3:00PM (EST)

Wednesday, July 26, 2017, 12:00PM (EST)

Thursday, July 27, 2017, 12:00PM (EST)

More information about both programs, including eligibility and offices participating, can be found at:

HP:   https://www.justice.gov/legal-careers/entry-level-attorneys

SLIP:  https://www.justice.gov/legal-careers/summer-law-intern-program

Center for Gender & Refugee Studies Launching Asylum Expert Witness Database

“The Center for Gender & Refugee Studies (CGRS) is launching a new project—a searchable database of qualified and pre-vetted country specialists and health professionals who serve as expert witnesses to support asylum seekers in the United States. This service will be offered to attorneys and experts alike, free of charge. In other areas of the law, the provision of expert witness referrals is highly developed and professionalized, but this will be the first project of its kind to do so in the asylum field.

The Asylum Expert Witness Database is scheduled to go live in late 2017 and will contain detailed profiles for hundreds of experts, as well as information, including outcomes, about cases for which they have provided testimony. When available, we will also include sample transcripts of the expert’s prior testimony and any government challenges to an expert’s qualifications. Experts will be able to update their own profiles to include information about current availability and fee requirements. In the meantime, we will continue to provide referrals when requested through our website http://cgrs.uchastings.edu/assistance.

We are currently seeking information from attorneys about recommended country specialists or health professionals for inclusion in the database. Please send information about any recommended experts, including contact information, areas of expertise, and CVs, to CGRS at CGRS-ExpertDB@uchastings.edu. We will follow up with attorneys and the experts themselves as we get closer to the go-live date.

For more information, please contact CGRS Staff Attorney Robyn Barnard at BarnardRobyn@uchastings.edu.”

New ABA Network Increases Legal Services for Homeless Youth

“In an effort to increase legal services to [homeless youth], the American Bar Association (ABA) recently launched the Homeless Youth Legal Network (HYLN). The initiative helps homeless youth ages 25 and younger, while also providing opportunities for legal professionals and service providers. ‘The Homeless Youth Legal Network is a fine example of how the American Bar Association can link youth experiencing homelessness with experts in the legal community who can help,’ ABA President Linda A. Klein. ‘This project, made possible with a grant from the ABA Enterprise Fund, shows how we can harness the power and reach of the ABA to improve access to justice by providing much-needed legal assistance to vulnerable populations.'”

Read more here.

Public-Defender Fees Waived for Those Found Innocent in California

“Californians accused of a crime but found not guilty will no longer have to pay for their public defenders after Gov. Jerry Brown on Monday signed a criminal justice-reform law striking the requirement. Under a bill authored by a pair of Los Angeles-area state senators, people using court-appointed counsel must only repay courts for legal costs if they are convicted. State Sen. Holly Mitchell, D-Los Angeles, said the current reimbursement laws are a detriment to low-income Californians and that Senate Bill 355 closes a damaging loophole which punishes individuals who are falsely arrested.”

Read more here.

Law schools are filled with Asian Americans. So why aren’t there more Asian judges?Supreme Court Courthouse (c) Stockvault

“While Asian Americans are the fastest growing minority group in law, and are overrepresented in the country’s top law schools as well as at major law firms, they lag behind all other racial groups when it comes to attaining leadership roles in the legal profession, according to a study released Tuesday by Yale Law School and the National Asian Pacific American Bar Association.”

Read more here.

Protecting At-Risk Children, KCBA Pro Bono Program, State Funding for Legal Aid Increased by $4.8M

Columbia Legal Services: Governor Signs Two Bills Protecting At-risk Children

“On July 6, 2017, Governor Jay Inslee signed two bills to better protect at-risk children in Washington. The first creates a pilot program allowing for abused and neglected children to better navigate the court system. The other creates a cabinet level agency to better coordinate services for children and families in the state.

Senate Bill (SB) 5890 improves the state’s foster system for both foster children and foster parents and funds a research project targeted at providing legal representation for children and youth in foster care.

“For children and youth in foster care, having an attorney means a greater chance to stay with family members, to spend less time in foster care, and to avoid homelessness,” said Hillary Madsen, staff attorney at Columbia Legal Services. “This study will provide critical information for lawmakers about the importance of attorneys.”

Read more here.

New Leadership for King County Bar Association’s pro bono programKCBA Logo

Anne Daly will be taking over leadership of the King County Bar Association’s pro bono programs. Anne has served as a past KCBA president (2013–14) who for the past 25 years has been with the Society of Counsel Representing Accused Persons, leading that public defense nonprofit since 1999. While her focus there has been on criminal defense for the indigent, her overall lifelong commitment to social justice and service to the marginalized in our community is inspiring.

A copy of a Bar Bulletin profile about Anne from 2013 is online here.

Legal Foundation of Washington: State Funding for Legal Aid Increased by $4.8MLogo for the Legal Foundation of Washington

“After a long six-month legislative session, the House and Senate finally agreed on a Fiscal Year 2017-2019 operating budget on Friday, June 30th. Late that night, Governor Inslee signed the budget to narrowly avoid a partial government shutdown. In a budget year when legislators struggled with issues such as education, mental health, and transportation, to receive a $4.8 million increase for legal aid (roughly a 20% increase in funding) is a gratifying result.

During FY 2017-2019, the new funding for legal aid will:

  • Create 15 new staffed civil legal aid attorneys;
  • Increase the capacity of pro bono programs across the state;
  • Invest in research and training for legal aid and pro bono attorneys; and,
  • Provide Northwest Justice Project attorneys with long overdue cost of living and salary adjustments.”

Read more here.

Former bank robber helped by Gates fund now professor at Georgetown Law School

“University of Washington law-school grad Shon Hopwood once served time in federal prison for robbing banks. Now he’s accepted a law professorship at Georgetown University.

Eighteen years ago, Nebraska native Shon Hopwood went to prison for breaking the law. This year, the University of Washington law-school graduate has been hired to teach it.

Hopwood has accepted a position as professor at Georgetown University School of Law. The 2014 graduate of the UW law school had gone to federal prison for 10 years in the late 1990s for robbing five banks in the Midwest.”

Read the full article here.

 

 

WA AGO Open House, 9th Annual Domestic Violence Symposium

August 9:  Washington State Attorney General’s Office Open House
Date:  August 9, 2017
Time:  11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Location:  Tumwater AGO in Olympia, WA

Second-year law students, third-year law students, judicial clerks, and licensed attorneys are invited to the AGO’s fifth annual Open House!  This event will provide those who may be considering a career as an Assistant Attorney General or as a Law Clerk the opportunity to learn about the AGO’s various divisions and recruitment programs and network with AGO representatives.  For more information, contact Linda Nakamura at Linda.Nakamura@atg.wa.gov

More information here.

September 7 & 8:  9th Annual Domestic Violence Symposium: The Bigger Picture
Date:  Thursday and Friday, September 7 & 8, 2017
Time:  8:30 a.m.
Location:  Seattle University

“Spend two days with us and your colleagues as we explore aspects that factor into the bigger picture of gender-based violence and response.  We will hear from The Full Frame Initiative, Futures Without Violence and others on topics including well-being, immigration, sexual coercion and violence, prevention, athletics, procedural justice, bias and culture, trial advocacy and more, highlighting that the whole is indeed greater than the sum of its parts.
In 2017 we will focus on “the Bigger Picture” of gender-based violence featuring:

  • The work of the Full Frame Initiative, an organization that works with systems to break cycles of poverty, violence, trauma and oppression by increasing access to wellbeing, especially for the marginalized;
  • The work of Futures Without Violence, specifically: 1) Changing Minds Campaign to End Childhood Trauma, 2) Audrie & Daisy film screening and discussion, and 3) Coaching Boys into Men program
  • The work of the Center for Court Innovation on Procedural Justice and Domestic Violence
  • The work of Caprice Hollins, Psy.D. with Cultures Connecting
  • Several presentations on issues impacting immigrant and refugee survivors
  • An array of other workshops that address contextual factors surrounding domestic and sexual violence and response.”

Register here.

Washington State Bar Foundation seeking law student to serve on its Board of Trustees

The Washington State Bar Foundation has an opening on its Board of Trustees for a law student, for a term beginning October, 2017.  The Washington State Bar Foundation is the fundraising arm of the Washington State Bar Association. Its mission is to provide financial support for WSBA programs that promote diversity within the legal profession and enhance the public’s access to and understanding of the justice system. Bar Foundation funding helps to power vital programs like the WSBA Moderate Means Project, Call To Duty, and more.

This term will begin October 1st, and will last for the duration of the student’s time in law school. Trustees are stewards of the Bar Foundation, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, and are actively involved in all aspects of donor development. This is a great opportunity for students interested in diversity, justice and public service, and for those looking to gain fundraising and nonprofit leadership experience while getting exposure to our statewide legal community.  If you wish to be considered, please submit a cover letter/e-mail and resume to foundation@wsba.org.
To learn more, please contact Laura Sanford, Donor & Community Partnerships Specialist at foundation@wsba.org or 206.239.2137.

More information here.