Need summer funding? Apply for the Fitzpatrick Fellowship

Due April 3: Fitzpatrick Fellowship summer funding available

Application Deadline: Monday, April 3, 2017

Professor Joan M. Fitzpatrick was a much loved and universally respected professor of human rights and international law at University of Washington School of Law. She helped establish human rights law as a legitimate field of legal specialization, tackling issues such as protecting refugees, promoting women’s rights, campaigning for gay and lesbian rights, and enforcing human rights during states of emergency. After her untimely death, students of Professor Fitzpatrick, determined to honor their beloved professor and the ideals she stood for, established the Joan M. Fitzpatrick Fellowship in Human Rights as a permanent memorial in her name.

The Fellowship is for a UW School of Law student with a demonstrated commitment to international human rights and an interest in working in the field in the future. The Fellowship award is intended to enable the recipient to travel and work at a nongovernmental, governmental or intergovernmental organization working on human rights and make a significant contribution during the period of fellowship (typically during the summer). The Fellowship is not intended to support research at an academic institution.

Read more and get application here.

Seattle Office for Civil Rights opens hotline to report discriminatory harassment 

Seattle Office for Civil Rights

The Seattle Office for Civil Rights (SOCR) today announced a new hotline for people to report harassment in Seattle. The Hotline is part of the City of Seattle’s Bias Hurts Campaign for Seattle residents and business owners who are the targets of discriminatory harassment, including threats, slurs, intimidation and cyberbullying. Call 206.233.7100 or go online to report discriminatory harassment. 

AG Ferguson to U.S. Supreme Court: Uphold transgender rights

Originally published March 3, 2017 by Washington State Attorney General’s Office. Media contact Peter Lavellee.

“Late yesterday, Attorney General Bob Ferguson led a coalition of 18 states and the District of Columbia in urging the United States Supreme Court to uphold a lower court ruling recognizing the right of a transgender student in Virginia to use the school bathroom corresponding to his gender identity. The states, co-led by Ferguson and New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, filed an amicus, or “friend of the court,” brief in Gloucester County School Board v. G.G.

Gavin Grimm, a transgender student, filed a lawsuit after his school board changed district policy in reaction to some parents’ complaints, barring him from using the boys’ restroom. A federal district court dismissed his claim, but the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals reversed that ruling and ordered the district court to continue hearing the case. Grimm brought his suit under Title IX of the Civil Rights Act, which prohibits discrimination based on sex.”

Read the full press release here.

ABA seeking nominations for Harrison Tweed Award

The ABA Standing Committee on Legal Aid and Indigent Defendants & The National Legal Aid and Defender Association invite nominations for the 2017 Harrison Tweed Award. The Harrison Tweed Award was created in 1956 to recognize the extraordinary achievements of state and local bar associations that develop or significantly expand projects or programs to increase access to civil legal services for persons living in poverty or criminal defense services for indigents. The award, given annually by the ABA Standing Committee on Legal Aid and Indigent Defendants and the National Legal Aid and Defender Association, is presented during the ABA Annual Meeting at a joint meeting of the National Conference of Bar Presidents, National Association of Bar Executives and National Conference of Bar Foundations.

Read more and nominate here.