Why we kept the electoral college; pro bono opportunity in housing law

TIME: The Troubling Reason the Electoral College Exists

The Signing of the Constitution of the United States, with George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, and Thomas Jefferson at the Constitutional Convention of 1787; oil painting on canvas by Howard Chandler Christy, 1940. The painting is 20 by 30 feet and hangs in the United States Capitol building. (Photo by GraphicaArtis/Getty Images)

The Signing of the Constitution of the United States, with George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, and Thomas Jefferson at the Constitutional Convention of 1787; oil painting on canvas by Howard Chandler Christy, 1940. The painting is 20 by 30 feet and hangs in the United States Capitol building. (Photo by GraphicaArtis/Getty Images)

The Troubling Reason the Electoral College Exists” published Nov. 8, 2016, updated Nov. 10, 2016, by TIME Magazine, written by Akhil Reed Amar. Illustration courtesy of TIME/Getty Images.

“Enter the 12th Amendment, which allowed each party to designate one candidate for president and a separate candidate for vice president. The amendment’s modifications of the electoral process transformed the Framers’ framework, enabling future presidential elections to be openly populist and partisan affairs featuring two competing tickets. It is the 12th Amendment’s Electoral College system, not the Philadelphia Framers’, that remains in place today. If the general citizenry’s lack of knowledge had been the real reason for the Electoral College, this problem was largely solved by 1800. So why wasn’t the entire Electoral College contraption scrapped at that point?

Standard civics-class accounts of the Electoral College rarely mention the real demon dooming direct national election in 1787 and 1803: slavery.” Read the full article here.

Due Jan. 1, Pro Bono Opportunity: Tenant Rights Bootcamp

be-seattleApplication Deadline: Sunday, Jan. 1, 2017

Law students welcome to apply to Tenant Rights Bootcamp Group Leader, Be:Seattle Organizing

Group leaders will act as a point of information for groups of 5-20 tenants. Group leaders hear and answer basic questions relating to a tenants situation  (i.e. What is the best way to communicate with my landlord? How do I ask for a repair? Can my landlord lock me out or vice versa? Etc.) or refer them to a tenant advocacy organization if their situation requires legal assistance. Read more about the position here.

Application Process: Please send a letter of interest to the contact email provided below to Devin Silvernail, devin@beseattle.com, 206-295-4192