Still looking for a job? Check out some of these opportunities!

Eastside Legal Assistance Program seeks PAID Bilingual Phone Line Intake Assistant

elap_2012_logo_for_web_mod_3_aeh_560x560Do you Speak Spanish? Are you looking for a Part time Job while Attending Law School and want to Increase Access to Justice? Your role as the Legal Phone Intake Assistant will be to screen callers for eligibility, perform the detailed case intake, and summarize the case for ELAP DV Staff Attorneys or our Pro Bono legal clinic attorneys to provide issue-tailored legal advice.

Applicants with foundational knowledge of legal issues are encouraged to apply.

Responsibilities include but are not limited to:

  • Staff phone line to answer calls from current and prospective clients
  • Screen callers for residence, income and civil legal matter guidelines
  • Perform detailed legal intake using the Legal Server Database.
  • Schedule legal clinic appointments and confirm or cancel existing appointments
  • Provide clients with referral information to appropriate community agencies
  • Assist with case management tasks as needed, such as data entry in Excel.
  • Report to ELAP Legal Clinic Coordinator
    *Training will be provided.

Position Requirements:

  • Commitment to ELAP’s mission in promoting equal access to justice.
  • Bilingual (English-Spanish).
  • Excellent writing skills.
  • Strong word processing skills, computer literacy, and data entry experience.
  • Excellent attention to detail and accuracy.
  • Interpersonal and communication skills, including the ability to respond to clients with patience and a non-judgmental attitude.
  • Ability to learn quickly, absorb and process new information and sort out relevant facts.
  • Ability to interview clients and write brief case summaries

Required language:

  • Spanish

SERVICE EMPLOYEES INTERNATIONAL UNION (SEIU) – Law student program interns and externs

seiuService Employees International Union (SEIU) has openings for part-time law clerks and full- and part-time externs , and for full-time law clerks in the Fall of 2016.

SEIU is a progressive, dynamic and growing labor organization representing over 2 million members in the United States, Puerto Rico and Canada, principally in the property service, public service, and health care fields. Attorneys in SEIU’s Legal Department engage in innovative lawyering to further the organization’s interests in organizing new workers, improving working conditions, engaging in political action, and achieving social justice. This includes representation of SEIU in litigation before courts and administrative agencies involving the National Labor Relations Act, the Fair Labor Standards Act, election campaign finance laws, and local and state labor relations statutes.

Law clerks and externs in the SEIU Legal Department conduct legal research and draft legal memoranda, work with attorneys on pending litigation, attend hearings and conferences, and meet with union leaders.

Generally, law clerks and externs are assigned to work in the Legal Department in Washington, D.C. However, a full-time law clerk may be assigned to work at a field location. One or more of the summer clerks will be selected through the Peggy Browning Fund (www.peggybrowningfund.org).

Law clerks are paid $22/hour. Externs receive credit from their law schools. We are interested in candidates with a demonstrated commitment to workers’ rights and social change. The successful applicant will have a strong academic background with excellent writing and researching skills. Completion of the basic labor law course is not required, but applicants who have taken it should so note on the application.

NOTE: THESE POSITIONS ARE ONLY OPEN TO CURRENT LAW STUDENTS; LAW SCHOOL GRADUATES ARE NOT ELIGIBLE.

To apply for this opportunity include:

· a cover letter that contains references .
· resume
· short writing sample
· law school grades

Submit all of the required materials at the same time.

If you are having technical difficulty in uploading your materials, send an email to LalaFatima.Alaoui@seiu.org . No telephone calls please.

Due Date: April 22 – EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW (EOIR)
SAN FRANCISCO IMMIGRATION COURT – Law Student Volunteer

seal_of_the_executive_office_for_immigration_reviewTypical assignments include drafting decisions on applications for asylum, researching and writing memoranda on whether a particular criminal offense renders a person subject to removal, and drafting decisions on motions to reopen in which a final order has been issued. In every assignment, law interns research and apply immigration statutes, regulations, and case law, thus increasing their familiarity with the field of immigration law and allowing them to exercise their research and writing skills. All interns work under the supervision of a staff attorney.

A cover letter; a resume; a legal writing sample (no longer than 8 to 10 pages); and a law school transcript (unofficial). Applicant’s should submit a cover letter explaining your interest in the internship with the Court, as well as the number of hours per week you are able to devote to the internship position and your school’s specific requirements for an intern position. Please forward applications to sanfranciscointern@usdoj.govEmail links icon.

Applications for part-time and full-time Fall 2016 internships will be accepted until April 22, 2016.

Deadlines and application requirements vary by Immigration Court. Please contact the Immigration Court of interest and ask to speak to the Judicial Law Clerk(s) about the intern program opportunities. Contact information for each of the Immigration Courts is available at http://www.justice.gov/eoir/sibpages/ICadr.htm.

Application Deadline: Friday, April 22, 2016

Due Date: April 15 – The Research and Fiscal Analysis (RFA) Division of the Washington State Department of Revenue (DOR) is excited to provide up to two summer internships

dor-whiteThe RFA Division provides fiscal and economic analysis for the Governor’s Office, the Legislature, other state agencies, local governments, and other divisions in the DOR. The high profile, varied, and interesting work in RFA provides students pursuing a career in economics, statistics, or financial analysis the opportunity to work in the government sector.

We are looking for someone who can work 30 to 40 hours per week during most weeks this summer. The start and end dates are flexible to accommodate the student’s schedule.

As a summer intern you will have an opportunity to assist tax policy specialists by:
· Updating tax analysis models and/or the underlying data
· Conducting analysis of existing or proposed tax changes
· Constructing, cleaning up, matching and merging databases
· Gathering and compiling data on various state taxes and tax changes

Required qualifications:
· Experience with Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel
· Completed at least four semesters or six quarters at an accredited college or university by the start of the internship.

Desired qualifications:
· Experience with Microsoft Access
· Experience with a statistical analysis software such as SAS, R, or STRATA

Compensation: $12.79 to 15.05 per hour.

HOW TO APPLY
Applicants must submit the following:
· Cover letter describing how you meet the qualifications
· Resume detailing your experience and education

Email your cover letter, resume, and an unofficial transcript to: ValerieT@dor.wa.gov by 5:00 p.m. on Friday, April 15, 2016. We anticipate conducting interviews by April 29, 2016.

AFL-CIO Policy Research Fellow

wslc-logo-300pThe Policy Department is responsible for formulating and advocating ideas that benefit working people and their unions.

The Policy Research Fellow is a full-time, one year position in Washington, D.C. The Policy Research Fellow works with senior department staff to provide data, information, analysis, communications and ideas as needed to support the work of the Policy Department and other departments of the AFL-CIO and has primary responsibility for responding to data requests from AFL-CIO staff.

Temporary one (1) year appointment.

OVERVIEW OF RESPONSIBILITIES:

  • Research in policy areas including economics, budget, tax, collective bargaining, labor standards, trade, health care, retirement security, education, and immigration;
  • General data collection and analysis;
  • Compiling and assisting in the quantitative and qualitative analysis of data, including data relating to labor markets, unions, and economic conditions;
  • Political, economic, and legislative analysis;
  • Assisting in the development, design, and organization of materials for meetings and conferences;
  • Assisting in the development, planning, and implementation of Policy Department activities;
  • Other duties as assigned.
  • Some travel may be required.

QUALIFICATIONS:

  • B.A. or B.S. recommended, preferably in economics, sociology, political science, or other relevant fields;
  • M.A. or J.D. strongly recommended;
  • At least 1-2 years relevant work experience (full or part-time, including internships) and demonstrated success in relevant areas;
  • Familiarity with government databases, including BLS, FRED, and Census databases;
  • Excellent written and verbal skills, including the ability to produce clear and timely analysis;
  • Proficiency in utilizing statistical information for policy analysis and advocacy;
  • Strong computer skills, such as Microsoft Word, Excel, and Outlook, and proficiency with web based research;
  • Demonstrated interest in progressive policy;
  • Demonstrated ability to work well within a team;
  • Demonstrated ability to work effectively in politically sensitive and high-pressure environments;
  • Ability and willingness to learn new skills and subject areas as workflow requires;
  • Ability and willingness to work extended or irregular hours as needed.

BAY AREA LEGAL AID – Law Clerk Program

bayarealegal200-1Bay Area Legal Aid (BayLegal) seeks dynamic law students with a strong commitment to public interest and social justice advocacy to help provide comprehensive legal services to the poor. BayLegal is currently accepting applications for the Spring 2016 and Summer 2016 classes.

BayLegal is the largest staff based non-profit law firm providing free civil legal services to low-income individuals and families in the San Francisco Bay Area. We provide services on a regional basis through local offices and clinics located in the following Bay Area counties: Alameda (Oakland); Contra Costa (Richmond); Marin; Napa; San Francisco; San Mateo (Redwood City); and Santa Clara (San Jose). Additionally, BayLegal has a regional Legal Advice Line which conducts intake and provides advice and counsel. With regional offices, and 100+ staff members, BayLegal is uniquely positioned to help people across county lines. BayLegal assists clients in five main priority areas: housing preservation, domestic violence and sexual assault prevention, economic security, consumer protection, and healthcare access.

Law clerkships are available throughout the year and applications are accepted on an ongoing basis year-round until all positions are filled (for summer candidates, we recommend submitting your application before February 1st). Please submit a completed BayLegal Law Clerk Application indicating your office(s) and project(s) preference along with a copy of your resume, cover letter, a list of at least three references and writing sample to:

Email: probono@baylegal.org OR

Mail: Bay Area Legal Aid – Law Clerk Program, 1735 Telegraph Avenue, Oakland, CA 94612

Join AILA volunteers nationwide on CITIZENSHIP DAY

April 13: “Right to Unite” film screening

rtu20bannerPlease join TMLG and Alliance for Justice for a special screening of The Right to Unite, a poignant documentary about Supreme Court cases that threaten to undermine the rights of working Americans. Narrated by Emmy Award-winning actor Bradley Whitford, the film tells the stories of two home care providers, Lidia Rodriguez and Alantris Muhammad, who were harmed by the Supreme Court’s 2014 decision in Harris v. Quinn. In Harris v. Quinn, the Supreme Court decided to limit the collective bargaining rights of home care providers, making it more difficult for these workers to join together and have a voice in their workplace.

The corporate interests behind Harris v. Quinn are not stopping with home care workers. In a pending case,Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association, all public sector workers are at risk, including firefighters, teachers, emergency medical technicians, librarians, and more. This film explores how preserving the right to unite is vitally important for workers, their families, and all of us – and what we can do to fight back.

Following the film will be a discussion about the case and the threat to all workers’ rights. Justice Antonin Scalia’s passing means the Supreme Court will decide Friedrichs with only eight justices. The fight over filling the Supreme Court vacancy comes at a critical time in the history of the Court, the law, and our nation.

April 15: Diversity Committee General Meeting (12:30-1:20pm @ Room 447)

taupc7ah_400x400Join this bi-weekly meeting with the UW Law’s Diversity Committee to discuss issues of diversity, inclusivity and community at our school. All Students, Faculty and Staff are encouraged to attend. We advise the Dean on ways to promote diversity and create a welcoming school climate that is supportive of all students, faculty and staff, particularly those from underrepresented groups. Taking input from our fellow students, staff and faculty, we pursue multiple avenues to support UW Law’s Diversity Statement and Diversity Plan, as well as our own initiatives within the school.

April 19: SJT – Why Universities Need A Definition of Anti-Semitism

SJTKenneth L. Marcus, president of the Louis D. Brandeis Center for Human Rights Under Law and former Director of the United States Commission on Civil Rights

Marcus will speak on legal causes of action for students who are affected by religious bias and discrimination on college campuses, and how universities can promote the civil rights of all students by adopting definitions of antisemitism and other religious discrimination. 1CLE credit offered.

Sponsorship of this event by the University of Washington School of Law does not imply endorsement. Co-Sponsored by:

  • The Louis D. Brandeis Center
  • The Cardozo Society
  • Hillel UW
  • StandWithUsNorthwest

April 20: SU Law -“Economic Justice from the Trenches”

seattle_university_school_of_lawCome hear about how to become a warrior for economic justice! You’ll hear the good, the bad, and the ugly from private practitioners, legal aid, and government lawyers – what they do, how they came to this work, what you need to know about the practice.  This moderated panel discussion will include solo practitioners Antoinette “Tonie” Davis ’99 and SaraEllen Hutchison, Julia Kellison of Northwest Justice Project, Anthony Leahy of Consumer Education and Training Services, Kim Gunning of the WA Attorney General’s Office, and Laura Solis of the Federal Trade Commission.

April 23: Join AILA volunteers nationwide on CITIZENSHIP DAY

sharethis_logoThe window is closing for eligible legal permanent residents to naturalize in time to vote in this year’s election: Help by volunteering at Citizenship Day on April 23, 2016. Citizenship Day is a free one-day legal clinic to help legal permanent residents apply for citizenship, and it’s hosted by AILA-WA, OneAmerica, and committed community partners statewide. It’s a great way to give pro-bono service without a long-term commitment, meet other attorneys and help your community. Signup now, and please forward the information below to your networks!

 WHEN: Saturday, April 23, 8:30am-5:30pm (approximately)

 YAKIMA – Yakima Valley Community College, Deccio Building (Parker Room), S 12th Ave and W Stewart St

 Reimbursements are available for AILA attorney volunteers and law students who travel more than 100 miles or 2 hours to volunteer. Please contact WNA Associate Mallori Thompson at mallori@weareoneamerica.org with any questions about volunteering. Volunteers who haven’t attended a Citizenship Day in the last year will be required to attend a 1-hour training prior to the day of the event. Training is available via recorded webinar you may watch on your own time.

 Attorneys & BIA Accredited Representative volunteers meet one on one with clients to determine eligibility for naturalization, answer questions, review applications for accuracy, provide further instructions for follow up or filing. Attorneys may also review the work of other attorneys during client checkout. You must be a licensed attorney or BIA Accredited Representative to fulfill this role. Attorney volunteers must have been in practice for at least 2 years, AND have completed at least five (5) N-400 applications over the course of those two years. If you would like to volunteer as an attorney but do not meet these requirements, please email WNA Manager Sarah Sumadi at sarah@WeAreOneAmerica.org.

April 27: From Standing in the Street to Having a Seat at the Table

jsternJoin CPSL and Jessica Stern, Executive Director of OutRight Action International for a discussion of OutRight’s work supporting LGBTQI individuals living in the Middle East. OutRight Action International is a leading international organization dedicated to human rights advocacy on behalf of people who experience discrimination or abuse on the basis of their actual or perceived sexual orientation, gender identity or expression. Jessica Stern specializes in gender, sexuality and human rights globally. As the first researcher on LGBT rights at Human Rights Watch and a Ralph Bunche Fellow at Amnesty International, she conducted fact-finding investigations and advocacy in relation to Iran, Kyrgyzstan, South Africa, and the United Arab Emirates. RSVP for this event through Symplicity. Campus location: William H. Gates Hall (LAW). Campus room: Room 138. Event types: Lectures/Seminars. Event sponsors: The Center for Public Service Law and OutRight Action International. Wednesday, April 27, 2016, 3:30 PM – 4:30 PM.

PILA Corner: Making a Small Dent to Help End Seattle Homeless

Making a Small Dent to Help End Seattle Homeless

by Baily Mullins

For my 1L summer, I interned at the Seattle Community Law Center, as part of the Disabled Homeless Advocacy Project. This unique program assists folks who are experiencing homelessness with their applications for Social Security disability benefits.

Making the Bureaucracy Work for Poor People.
people-844213_960_720During this internship, I was able to participate in numerous stages of the SSDI application process. Much of my time was spent interviewing clients and collecting preliminary information to start their disability applications, which included their medical history, work history, and any information pertinent to their disabilities. I quickly learned that the benefits application process is relatively colorless and standardized. So to paint a more holistic picture of our clients, I wrote “medical summary reports,” which accounted for my client’s personal background beyond the information that could be found in their medical records.

I was also able to work on an “On the Record Request,” which is a legal brief sent to the Office of Disability Adjudication and Review, requesting that a decision about our client be based on the “record,” or the medical evidence alone. To write an effective request, I had to understand the criteria outlined by the social security administration to meet a disability requirement, and provide specific evidence about how our client met the disability. It was very much an “IRAC” situation!

Meet People Where They Are.

Most of my work at SCLC was spent in the office completing routine paperwork, but SCLC also believes in meeting people “where they are,” so I often accompanied my supervising attorney to meet clients at local shelters, temporary housing, and medical facilities. These were some of my favorite days because we were bringing legal resources to clients who otherwise would be unable to access them.

This internship often involved tedious work, but I enjoyed the challenge of trying to creatively advocate for our clients with the administrative tools that we had. I am grateful for the experience I had at Seattle Community Law Center and appreciate the inspiration it has given me to continue my public service track.

Photo credit: https://pixabay.com/static/uploads/photo/2015/07/14/06/10/people-844213_960_720.jpg

 

 

Pro Bono Honors Society Deadline Is Upon us!

Another Summer Grant Opportunity- Don’t Miss Out! Deadline April 15!

bhfdt7pcuaabqslI’m writing to let you know about a source of funding for law student summer service that is going underutilized.  It’s the Equal Justice Works AmeriCorps JD program.  Students secure their own placements at nonprofit organizations or government agencies, then fill out a brief application, serve at least 300 hours and submit a short report on their activities.  In return, they receive an education award of $1,222 that can be applied to tuition or student loans.

The priority deadline for submitting applications is Friday, April 15, 2016.  Note that students may not get law school credit and the education award for the same service, but they may receive outside funding up to $4,300 and still be eligible for the education award.

Interested students can fill out the brief application here

May 9: Attention Students! Pro Bono Honors Society Deadline Is Upon us

taupc7ah_400x400Between May 2015 and April  2016, did you:

  •  Volunteer for IFAP, PFJP, SYLAW, CHRJ App Help, ELS research project?
  • Do law-related pro bono work for a community-based legal or public interest organization?
  • Volunteer as a case manager or leader for a student-led pro bono project?
  • Intern last summer for a public interest organization and didn’t get a summer grant, stipend or externship credit?

If you can answer YES to any of these questions you are likely eligible to participate in the UW Law Pro Bono Honors Society!

Submit your online form so that you can be recognized with fellow students, faculty and staff with a Pro Bono Service Award at graduation!

For complete information please click here.

Student Pro Bono Honors Deadline: Monday, May 9.

Student Debt: Department of Education FOIA Lawsuit

aclu_picStudent debt is a major driver of lifelong debt cycles and presents a significant civil rights challenge. The federal student loan program grows out of a commitment to educational opportunities for all Americans, yet research shows there are significant racial disparities at every major inflection point of the student debt system, from the magnitude of the debt burden borrowers undertake to the chances of being victimized by predatory educational programs and harmful debt-collection practices.

The American Civil Liberties Union and National Consumer Law Center submitted a Freedom of Information Act request on May 7, 2015, to the federal Department of Education reflecting concerns that the department’s student debt collection practices disproportionately harm students of color and may be violating those students’ constitutional rights.

The Department of Education exercises extraordinary debt-collection powers: It has authority to garnish the wages of borrowers who default on their loans and to intercept tax refunds and other government payments, including funds directed

toward economically vulnerable people. This authority raises inherent concerns. It implicates the due process rights of borrowers, with the most significant impact most likely on low-income people.

To continue reading, click here

Judge Rules Yakima-Area Hospitals Violated Charity Care Law and Breached Contracts with Indigent Patients

columbia20legal20servicesLast week, a Yakima County Superior Court judge ruled in favor of a class of indigent patients against the parent company of Yakima Regional Medical Center (YRMC) and Toppenish Community Hospital. Judge Susan L. Hahn found that the hospitals had a practice of violating the Washington Charity Care Act by failing to screen patients for financial need before demanding payments from patients-many times in the form of up-front deposits as a condition of receiving care. She also found that this practice violated the hospital’s contract with its patients because it caused patients to pay money they did not owe under Washington law.

“All Hospitals have to provide their fair share of charity care, under Washington law,” said Eleanor Hamburger, of Sirianni Youtz Spoonemore Hamburger and one of the attorneys for the class. “By making their obligation to provide charity care a well-kept secret, the hospitals required some patients to pay more than legally allowed for treatment, forced others to go without the medical care they needed, and foisted its responsibility for providing charity care on its closest competitor. Now the Court has concluded that this practice is illegal and a breach of contract.”

The lawsuit, pending since late 2013, points to YRMC’s policy of demanding deposits from low-income patients and refusal to refund deposits even after patients qualify for charity care, which is free or reduced-cost care they are entitled to under the law. “YRMC’s deposit policy and other barriers to accessing charity care may be driving low-income patients away from that hospital and towards Yakima Valley Memorial [a non-profit hospital across town], or away from care altogether,” concluded Carolyn A. Watts, Ph.D., formerly the Faculty Director at the University of Washington’s Health Policy Analysis Program, in a declaration submitted as part of the case.

To continue reading, click here

UW project focuses on fines and fees that create ‘prisoners of debt’ by Deborah Bach

Criminals are meant to pay their debts to society through sentencing, but a different type of court-imposed debt can tie them to the criminal justice system for life and impact their ability to move forward with their lives.

7468312536_86e79a6ef2_k

DonkeyHotey / Flickr

Though debtors’ prisons were eliminated in the United States almost two centuries ago, a modern-day version exists in the dizzyingly complex system of fines and fees levied against people as they move through the court system.

Offenders are charged for everything from DNA samples to electronic monitoring devices, jury trials and even room and board while imprisoned. The fees can add up to thousands of dollars, and those who fail to pay are routinely jailed.

Little is known about how such fines and fees differ among or even within states, but a new University of Washington-based initiative will provide new insight on the issue. Alexes Harris, an associate professor of sociology, is the principal investigator of a five-year research project on monetary sanctions in eight states. The $3.9 million project, funded by the Laura and John Arnold Foundation, will be the first systematic study of how multiple states implement court-imposed fees.

To continue reading, click here

Join the National Lawyers Guild for their regional conference here at UW!

April 6: JD/LL.M Concurrent Degree Program – Information Session

taupc7ah_400x400Join us Wednesday, April 6 at 12:30PM in Room 116 for more information about the Concurrent LL.M. Degree in Sustainable International Development & CLINICAL & HANDS-ON OPPORTUNITIES in International Human Rights & Sustainable Development For the 2016-17 Academic Year

  • THEORIES & TOOLS FOR COMBATTING CORRUPTION (Prof. Anita Ramasastry)
  • WOMEN, POVERTY AND NATURAL RESOURCES (Prof. Renee Giovarelli)
  • INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CLINIC (Prof. Alejandra Gonza)
  • DEVELOPMENT INNOVATIONS LAB (Prof. Jennifer Lenga-Long)
  • Global Development Law &Policy Workshop (Prof. Randi Hedin)

For more information, click here (2016-17 Concurrent SID LLM and Clinical OPPORTUNITIES flyer)

April 9-10: National Lawyers Guild NW Regional Conference

national-lawyers-guildThe conference is a gathering of Guild members from the region’s legal workers, law students, lawyers, and jailhouse lawyers at which we make decisions about regional governance, share victories and resources, and learn more about the important work Guildmembers are doing in the Northwest.

Admission fee is $10-50, sliding scale based on ability to pay. This covers admission on both days, snacks on both days, and lunch on Saturday. There is no additional cost for CLE credit.

Below are suggested guidelines for what to pay. We know that your family size or other circumstances affect what you can pay, and we want to see you at the conference! Please pay as much as you can given your personal financial situation. Thank you for supporting the Guild in the Northwest!

Law student: $10
New attorney/Legal worker: $20
Attorney with income under $40K: $30
Attorney with income $40-$60K: $40
Attorney with income over $60K: $50

Members of minority bar associations need only pay half of the suggested rate for their income.

Type in the amount you want to pay in the “price” box.

If you wish to pay with cash or check at the door, do not enter an amount in the “price” box. We cannot accept cards at the door.

April 16: Seattle University School of Law’s Influential Voices featuring Dean Erwin Chemerinsky

erwin_chemerinsky_09-2007Erwin Chemerinsky is the founding Dean and Distinguished Professor of Law, and Raymond Pryke Professor of First Amendment Law, at the University of California, Irvine School of Law, with a joint appointment in Political Science. His areas of expertise are constitutional law, federal practice, civil rights and civil liberties, and appellate litigation. He is the author of eight books, including The Case Against the Supreme Court published in 2014, and more than 200 articles in top law reviews. He frequently argues cases before the nation’s highest courts, including the United States Supreme Court, and also serves as a commentator on legal issues for national and local media. He writes a weekly column for the Orange County Register, monthly columns for the ABA Journal and the Daily Journal, and frequent op-eds in newspapers across the country. In January 2014, National Jurist magazine named Dean Chemerinsky as the most influential person in legal education in the United States. Chemerinsky holds a law degree from Harvard Law School and a bachelor’s degree from Northwestern University.

Image address: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e4/Erwin_chemerinsky_09-2007.JPG

May 19: 6th Annual Eastside Legal Assistance Program Breakfast for Justice

elap_2012_logo_for_web_mod_3_aeh_560x560We invite you to join our distinguished host committee on Thursday, May 19, 2016, for the 6th Annual ELAP Breakfast for Justice and help support legal services for low-income families and survivors of domestic violence.

Keynote Speaker: James Bamberger, Director of Washington’s Office of Civil Legal Aid

In his keynote address, James Bamberger will present the recent findings about the increased “Justice Gap” impacting low-income residents of Washington State. The updated Civil Legal Needs Study reveals that the need for securing equal access to justice is greater than ever.