Check out UW Law alum, Nikkita Oliver, on “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert”

Columbia Legal Services: Student Homelessness Across Washington State Increases 9%: Approximately 1 in 30 students homeless

columbia20legal20servicesSEATTLE – This week, the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) reported that 35,511 students were homeless in the 2014-15 school year–a 9.1 % increase from the previous year. This alarming increase underscores the enormous scope of the challenges facing students who are experiencing homelessness. The data reveals that homelessness disproportionately impacts students of color.
African American, American Indian, and Latino students are 2 to 3 times more likely to be homeless. We estimate that between 2,600 and 4,400 of these students may be unaccompanied homeless youth who are not in the custody of a parent or guardian.

Homelessness has a significant impact on a student’s ability to learn. OSPI noted that homeless students have a graduation rate of 51.9%, compared to 78.1% in the general population. It is estimated that every time a student changes schools they lose 4-6 months of educational progress. Schools receive little support to address the needs of homeless students. Only 34 of Washington’s 300 school districts receive modest federal grants under the federal McKinney-Vento Act to help support homeless students, leaving many districts to tackle this crisis alone.

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SUBMIT YOUR PAPER to the 15th Annual National Native American Law Students Association Writing Competition

cropped-cropped-nnalsa_logoThe NNALSA Writing Competition aims to recognize excellence in legal research/writing related to Indian law; encourage the development of writing skills among NNALSA members; and enhance substantive knowledge in Federal Indian Law, Tribal Law, and traditional forms of government.

Eligible Topics Include:

  • Federal Indian Law and Policy
  • Tribal Law and Policy
  • International Law and Policy Concerning Indigenous Peoples
  • Comparative Law (i.e. Inter-Tribal or Gov.-to-Gov. Studies)
  • Other Related Topics

Prizes:

  • First Prize: $1,000Publication in the Columbia Journal of Race and Law, sponsored by Sonosky
  • Second Prize: $500, sponsored by Dentons
  • Third Prize: $250, sponsored by Akin Gump

Awardees will be recognized at the National NALSA annual meeting (part of the 41st Annual Federal Bar Association Indian Law Conference on April 7–8, 2016).

Submit To: 2016NNALSAWritingCompetition@gmail.com.

  • Please remove identifying information such as name and school.
  • No need to supply any registration form or identification number.
  • All competitors must be current NNALSA members.
  • To become a member, visit www.nationalnalsa.org.

Deadline: 5:00 p.m. (EST), Monday, February 8, 2016.

For more information, visit goo.gl/RMvhuy or contact jmb2369@columbia.edu

UW Law Alum Nikkita Oliver on “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert”!

Here is a bit that Nikkita wrote explaining her involvement with “White Privilege II”:

24_oliver_wideIn the winter of 2014, after the non-indictment of Darren Wilson, Hollis Wong-Wear hit me up saying, “Macklemore (Ben) would like to meet with you (and other BLM activists/organizers) about the Black Lives Matter movement in Seattle.” My initial reaction was, “Why?” Like many black members of the hip-hop community I have a rather critical analysis of Macklemore and white supremacy in hip-hop—an art form and culture birthed out of the struggles and ingenuity of black people. Yet, I knew if I truly value the principle “each one teach one,” then I would sit down and have, in the least, a dialogue with Ben.

 Hollis, Ben and I talked for nearly three hours about BLM, Seattle, hip-hop, intersectionality, and ending white supremacy. It was clear to me from that conversation that Ben’s desire to be a part of the movement in an accountable manner was genuine.

 A month later Ben asked if he could spit some bars for me. Sitting in his Cadillac on Broadway I listened to the first iteration of the song. For nearly two hours we talked; thinking through different elements of the writing, the movement, and what it looks like to stand in accountable solidarity with BLM as a wealthy white cis-gender male with a wide music platform.

To continue reading, click here. Also, read her thoughts on the project in a piece written for The Stranger here.

UW Law Student Researches Industry Gender Inequity, Calls for Reforms by Peter Kelley, UW Today

Women routinely outperform men in university classrooms across the United States and are invited more often than men to join student honors societies — yet women continue to be paid far less than similarly qualified male colleagues. Photo of Harlan Mechling, a graduate student in the UW School of Law

Adding to that inequity, women also fare poorly when suing to recover damages for workplace sex and gender discrimination in the courts, with only 6 percent of such cases going to trial and then only one-third of even those cases being successful.

These are among the points underscored by Harlan Mechling, a graduate student in the UW School of Law and holder of this year’sHazelton Research Fellowship, in a research paper on gender inequity in the American workplace.

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