City of Seattle releases “Race & Social Justice Community Survey”

New CAGJ Webinar: “Linking Food Justice to Trade Policy”

3815441846_4f038805b5_o_dWebinar: “Linking Food Justice to Trade Policy”
A 30 min. webinar (on you-tube) about how food justice and food sovereignty are threatened by new (so-called) free-trade agreements,  the TPP/Trans-Pacific Partnership, and TTIP/Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership.
Background:

  • About Food Sovereignty & Fair Trade, What is Fair about Free Trade? What is Fast Track?
  • Corporate Influence on Free Trade Agreements (FTAs), Impacts of NAFTA on Mexico, FTAs and the Domestic Economy, Currently proposed Trade Agreements

After Overpayment Of Benefits, VA Wanted $38,000 Back – Patricia Murphy

clayhull-2015-8edit_custom-afe9e1889c09769894f8e31e7c7abe20fabeafa0-s800-c85Clay Hull has a stubborn sense of justice.

After an improvised explosive device blast in Iraq ended his time in the military, he fought the Army and the Department of Veterans Affairs over the amount of compensation they awarded him for his injuries.

“If I’m in the wrong, I’ll admit it. But I’m not going to let somebody just push me around, especially the VA,” he says.

It was complicated and drawn out, but Hull now gets the maximum the VA pays for disability.

The money pays for his mortgage, support for his young son and feed for the livestock on Hull’s 3 acres in south central Washington — 2 1/2 hours from Seattle.

He has a day job as a shipping clerk and then comes home to work on his place. He’s currently fixing a fence that runs along his property line.

Four years after he moved in, Hull went to prison on a weapons charge. Hull notified the VA he was in prison.

Continue reading here

Photo credit: Gordon King for NPR

AP: Feds imperiled many migrant kids during surge

4556659182_c4981bc62d_o_dLOS ANGELES — As tens of thousands of children fleeing violence in Central America crossed the border in search of safe harbor, overwhelmed U.S. officials weakened child protection policies, placing some young migrants in homes where they were sexually assaulted, starved or forced to work for little or no pay, an Associated Press investigation has found.

Without enough beds to house the record numbers of young arrivals, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services lowered its safety standards during border surges in the last three years to swiftly move children out of government shelters and into sponsors’ homes. The procedures were increasingly relaxed as the number of young migrants rose in response to spiraling gang and drug violence in Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador, according to emails, agency memos and operations manuals obtained by AP, some under the Freedom of Information Act.

First, the government stopped fingerprinting most adults seeking to claim the children. In April 2014, the agency stopped requiring original copies of birth certificates to prove most sponsors’ identities. The next month, it decided not to complete forms that request sponsors’ personal and identifying information before sending many of the children to sponsors’ homes. Then, it eliminated FBI criminal history checks for many sponsors.

Continue reading here.

Photo credit: https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3498/4556659182_c4981bc62d_o_d.jpg

It’s here! The Race and Social Justice Community Survey

official_seal_of_seattle The City of Seattle wants to hear from YOU! Seattle has launched its second Race and Social Justice Community Survey. The survey measures how people who live, work or go to school in Seattle think the City is doing on jobs, housing, meeting community needs and race and equity. The information collected will help guide the City’s racial equity work and determine areas for City government to prioritize through its policies and programs. The survey is anonymous and takes about 12 minutes to complete.

Take the survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/RSJCommunitysurvey 

The survey runs for three weeks from January 13th through Friday, February 5th. To ensure representation from Seattle’s diverse communities and those without access to the internet, the Seattle Office for Civil Rights is conducting targeted outreach and partnering with community organizations. The survey is also available in Spanish, Vietnamese, Korean, Amharic, Somali, Oromo and Chinese. The links to translated surveys will be available starting the week of Jan 19th at http://www.seattle.gov/rsji/community/survey.

Survey results will be shared at a community meeting in the spring of 2015. 

To learn more visit www.seattle.gov/rsji or contact Brenda Anibarro at (206) 684-4514 or email Brenda.Anibarro@Seattle.gov