Want to Learn More about Prison Reform and Immigration Detention? Check Out the Lunch Events This Week!

November 2: End It, Don’t Mend It!: Abolition & the Mainstreaming of Prison and Police Reform

Date: Monday, Nov. 2, 2015
Time: 12:30 – 1:20 PM
Location: William H. Gates Hall, RM 127 unless otherwise noted

IMAP Event Flyer

November 3 & 10: Two-Part Social Justice Tuesday Presentations – Resistance to Immigration Detention: From the Local to the National

SJT

Date: Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2015; Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2015
Time: 12:30 – 1:20 PM
Location: William H. Gates Hall, RM 127 unless otherwise noted

In the absence of effective immigration reform, the federal government’s use of detention as an immigration enforcement strategy has increased exponentially.  To keep up with the national quota that requires Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to maintain no less than 34,000 immigration detention beds at all times, immigrants, including lawful permanent residents and asylum seekers, are detained for months and sometimes years. Conditions of confinement in immigration detention facilities are deplorable and yet there are no enforceable regulations that govern management of the detention facilities.  Without access to affordable legal services, conditions of confinement often go unaddressed and immigrant detainees remain particularly vulnerable.  While detained individuals and their families suffer greatly, the private prison industry that contracts with the government to oversee immigration detention facilities are using “guaranteed minimum” contract provisions to maintain profits whether the beds are filled or not.  This contract scheme safeguards profits for private companies while incentivizing the incarceration of immigrants. Problematic partnerships between ICE and local law enforcement only exacerbate the problem, leading to the transfer of immigrants from jails and prisons to immigration detention centers.

Our two-part Social Justice Tuesday Presentations will address the proliferation of immigration detention and showcase stories and strategies of resistance and defiance both locally and nationally.

Tuesday, Nov. 3rd:  Panel 1:  The Problem and The Local Response:
The first panel will help frame our discussion and bring the problem to life. The panel will highlight immigrant activists who were on the front lines of the hunger strikes at the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma.  Their experiences and insights will lay the foundation a legal advocate from the ACLU of Washington to examine the role of lawyers in the detention resistance efforts.  The panel will conclude with the perspective of a community organizer who is engaged in fighting against the privatization of prisons.

Maru Mora Villalpando, Latino Advocacy /Northwest Detention Center Resistance
Maru Mora Villalpando is a bilingual community organizer, consultant and political analyst with more than 10 years of experience working on immigrant rights and racial justice issues. She is the founder of Latino Advocacy Inc. which provides consulting for non-profits in the areas of policy and membership development, workshops and meetings facilitation.

Margaret Chen, ACLU of Washington
Margaret Chen is a Staff Attorney at the ACLU of Washington  She was one of the attorneys that sought a Temporary Restraining Order (TRO) to prohibit U.S. Immigration and Enforcement (ICE) from retaliating against immigration detainees who engage in First Amendment-protected activities by placing them in solitary confinement.  The lawsuit grew out of events at the Northwest Detention Center (NWDC) in Tacoma, Washington.  Several hundred detainees at (NWDC) initiated a hunger strike to express concerns with national immigration policy and to raise awareness about the conditions of their confinement.  In response, ICE began placing individuals in solitary confinement in retaliation for their support of the hunger strikes.

Andrea Lopez-Diaz, Community Organizer, Ending the Prison Industrial Complex/YUIR
Andrea Lopez-Diaz is a community organizer whose woks focuses on prison reform issues in Washington state.

If you would like lunch please RSVP via Symplicity or gatespsl@uw.edu RSVP by 12:00 pm Monday, November 2.

November 12: Fania Davis – Understanding the Intersection of Restorative and Racial Justice

Fania Davis Flyer

Date: Thursday, Nov. 12, 2015
Time: 6:30 PM
Location: Langston Hughes Performing Arts Institute, 104 17th Ave. S., Seattle, WA 98144

FREE ENTRY.  Join us for a casual reception starting at 5:30 PM.  Light refreshments will be served.

Fania Davis is a founder and current Director of RJOY (Restorative Justice for Oakland Youth). She has been active for many decades in the civil rights, Black liberation, women’s, prisoners’, peace, anti-racial violence and anti-apartheid movements.

Founded in 2005, RJOY focuses on reducing racial disparities by promoting restorative approaches that engage families, communities, and systems. Beginning in 2007, RJOY’s West Oakland Middle School pilot project eliminated violence and expulsions, and reduced suspension rates by 87%.

For more information, click here.


December 10 – 13: Early Bird Rates Ends November 6! Register Now for Conference on Advancing Human Rights 2015 – Sharpening Our Vision, Reclaiming Our Dreams

 

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Date: Thursday, Dec. 10, 2015 – Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015
Time: 5:00 AM EST – 5:00 AM EST
Location: Hilton Austin, 500 E. 4th St., Austin, TX 78701

This year’s conference theme is Sharpening our Vision, Reclaiming our Dreams. This theme reflects the deep need to re-center an economic, social and cultural rights (ESCR) agenda as a key component of our movement work. Building off of Martin Luther King, Jr’s Poor People’s Campaign and his understanding that an end to racial oppression requires addressing poverty and all human rights, we seek to re-affirm and elevate the link between inequality, violence, and the criminalization of economically and politically marginalized groups. Effective human rights movement building demands an intersectional approach in which equal attention is given to the role and impact of race, gender and gender identity, economic and social class, sexuality, disability, age, immigration status and other dimensions of our lives.

For more information, click here.

January 15: Save the Date! King County Bar Association Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Annual Luncheon

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Date: Friday, Jan. 15, 2015
Time: 12:00 PM
Location: Seattle Sheraton Hotel, 1400 Sixth Ave., Seattle, WA

Keynote Speaker: 

C.T. Vivian

Additional Information about C.T. Vivian

  • Legendary Civil Rights Activist
  • Presidential Civil Rights Advisor
  • Founder, C.T. Vivian Leadership Institute

Please join us on January 15 to honor and celebrate Dr. King’s birthday and his legacy.

Questions, please call the KCBA CLE & Events Department at 206.267.7067.