Attention Post Grad Students! AmeriCorps Fellowship Deadlines Fast Approaching!

Want to Host A Social Justice Tuesday This Year?

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Want to host a Social Justice Today this Year? Don’t miss out! Any UW Law student organization can team up with the Center for Public Service Law to host an SJT.

Learn more about how to sign up here. 

2015 AmeriCorps Legal Fellowships Still Available to Begin between August 15 and September 15

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There are several postgraduate fellowship positions available with organizations across the country through out Veterans Legal Corps and Employment Opportunity Legal Corps. The fellowships are one-year and will begin in August or September 2015.

Host organizations will post more information on positions over the next several weeks, so please continue to check back!

For more information click here.

Attention 3Ls and Recent Grads! 2016 Equal Justice Works Fellowships Application Deadline Closes September 18

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The 2016 application is open through September 18. Register for these 2016 Equal Justice Works Fellowships webinars for application tips and to learn about sponsorship opportunities in medical-legal partnerships with special guest, Ellen Lawton of the National Center for Medical-Legal Partnership at GWU’s Department of Health Policy.

Check out the following for helpful information about EJW Fellowships:

Filipino Lawyers of Washington Now Accepting Applications for 2015 Pangarap Scholarship

Filipino Lawyers of Washington

Each year, the Filipino Lawyers of Washington (“FLOW”) awards up to 3 scholarships ranging from $500 to $3,000 to law students in the Pacific Northwest. The scholarships are intended to recognize law students who have demonstrated significant commitment to community service, particularly service to the Filipino/Filipino American community. You need not be of Filipino ethnicity to apply.

Applications must be e-mailed to students@filipinolawyers.org no later than Saturday September 25, 2015 at 5pm PST.

To download the application, click here.

U.S. Grassroots Groups File Request for Hearing on Right to Water and Sanitation at International Human Rights Commission

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By US Human Rights Network

Washington, DC – July 29, 2015 – Yesterday, on the 5th Anniversary of the UN General Assembly resolution on the human right to safe and clean drinking water and sanitation, the US Human Rights Network, along with more than twenty U.S. grassroots and national groups, individuals, and universities filed a request for a hearing with the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR), a regional human rights commission, regarding the human right to water in the United States.

The request is responding to the urgent situations nationwide involving a lack of access to clean and affordable water, and highlights several of those critical situations that represent key water challenges in urban, rural, and indigenous communities. The request includes information on African-American communities in Michigan, Maryland, and rural Alabama, Latino communities in rural California, and Indigenous communities in the Southwest that have been disproportionately affected.

Continue reading here.

Solitary Confinement: Punished for Life

Joseph Harmon Photo, (c) NYT, Max Whittaker

By Erica Goode | New York Times | Photo credit Max Whittaker for NYT (Photo of Joseph Harmon)

In 1993, Craig Haney, a social psychologist, interviewed a group of inmates in solitary confinement at Pelican Bay State Prison, California’s toughest penal institution.

He was studying the psychological effects of isolation on prisoners, and Pelican Bay was among the first of a new breed of super-maximum-security prisons that states around the country were beginning to build.

Twenty years later, he returned to Pelican Bay for another set of interviews. He was startled to find himself facing some of the same prisoners he had met before, inmates who now had spent more than two decades alone in windowless cells.

Continue reading here.  

Watch the video on the Effects of Solitary Confinement by Colin Archdeacon and Center for Constitutional Rights here.