Are there “good” prosecutors? How does the media impact female attorneys? What can you do in environmental law? Answer all of these questions with next week’s thought-provoking events!

2/9: Why Prosecutors Might Do Bad Things? Gates Public Service Law Speaker Series with Professor Alafair Burke

Professor Burke, Professor of Law and Hofstra Research Fellow at Hofstra University teaches criminal law and criminal procedure subjects. Her research intersects criminal law and procedure and focuses on policing and prosecutorial policies. She has written about prosecutorial decision making, community policing and non-punitive responses to crime problems, and the criminal law’s treatment of domestic violence, both in punishing batterers and in explaining the conduct of battered women.

Before joining the law school faculty in 2001, Professor Burke served as a deputy district attorney in Portland, Oregon, where she tried more than 30 criminal cases, primarily against domestic violence offenders, and helped innovate neighborhood-based prosecution methods.

Co-sponsored by the King County Prosecutor’s Office

RSVP via Symplicity or gatespsl@uw.edu

2/10: Social Justice Tuesday – Under the Spotlight: Media’s Portrayal of Female Attorneys  

SJTAre media portrayals of female attorneys harmful? Is it time to shift the conversation and stop talking about appearance? Join the Center for Public Service Law, the Dean’s Advisory Committee on Diversity, and the Womens’ Law Caucus for this vibrant panel discussion and share your thoughts on the media, its influence, and the direction the legal community should take to address gender issues in the media. Speakers include: Michelle Gonzalez (Assistant Dean UW Law), Chelsea Petersen (Perkins Coie), and Judge Susan Craighead has been invited. The event will be at 12:30 PM in Room 127.

2/11: Careers in Environmental Law 

Please join Environmental Law Society, Environmental Law Program, Center for Professionalism & Leadership Development, and Center for Public Service Law for this exciting panel on February 11 at 12:30 PM in Room 127 to answer some of your burning questions about pursuing a career in environmental law, including: what are the top and cutting-edge issues in environmental law today? What are some of the best strategies for law students interested in a career in environmental law? Panelists will include Valerie K. Rickman (Cascadia Law Group PLLC), Laura Watson (WA Attorney General’s Office), Marcus Pearson (Plauche & Carr LLP), Cliff Villa (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency), and Linda Larson (Marten Law). We hope to see you there!

Take a trip to California or find a new way to use that J.D. with these exciting opportunities!

AmeriCorps JD is now accepting applicants! 

We will accept applications through April 15, 2015 from students, who not only work in the priority areas defined below, but who provide service to low-income communities in other areas of law. The 300 service hours required to earn the education award can be completed anytime from when the application is accepted and the background check has been initiated through August 31, 2015.

PRIORITY AREAS: Priority will be given to applications from students who are serving veterans, military families or victims of disasters, or focusing on removing barriers to employment or housing. However, we also have many spots available for students working with other populations and in other areas of law.

Some more examples of the type of work students can do within these priority areas include:

  • Direct legal services: intake, legal form preparation, performing client and witness interviews, advocating for clients by telephone and in person, attending hearings, assisting attorneys in legal representation, carrying out legal research and writing
  • Outreach and education: developing and distributing fact sheets, developing and delivering training on legal topics or on how to access legal services, ensuring potential clients are aware of their rights and available services
  • Capacity building: activities which build the capacity of your host organization or other organizations to provide services in the previously specified priority areas, such as an organizational assessment, compiling best practices, organizing focus groups, leading planning committees

You can also learn more about organizations and the legal services being provided for veterans, disaster, and employment issues by viewing our Fellow profiles on our website.

The AmeriCorps program, under the Corporation for National and Community Service, has a list of prohibited activities that cannot be included in the hours of service completed to earn the Segal AmeriCorps Education Award. A list of these activities can be found here.

Students serving in the priority areas or other issue areas may apply now through Wednesday, April 15, 2015. Visit our website for more information about the application process. Questions may be directed to AmeriCorpsJD@equaljusticeworks.org.

UW Law Students: Re-ignite your Social Justice Heart and Vision at the Annual Trina Grillo Retreat in Sunny Santa Clara, CA!

The Trina Grillo Retreat at Santa Clara Law (March 20-21, 2015) provides a unique opportunity for public interest and social-justice oriented law students, faculty, and practitioners to forge an alliance by exchanging viewpoints, exploring career opportunities, and formulating strategies for social justice.

Join with law students from several west coast law schools to re-imagine the next generation of social justice lawyering.  Funding up to $250 in reimbursement is available for UW Law students interested in attending.  Send a letter of interest and resume to mestorms@uw.edu by Feb 20 noon  if you would like to attend.

Attention Recent Grads! You Can Help Preserve Public Service Loan Forgiveness

Please don’t forget to fill out and pass on Equal Justice Works’ quick survey about the effect of Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) on your career. While they hear anecdotally how critical PSLF is to making long term public interest careers possible, there is little hard data on the program’s impact. If Congress does propose capping the amount of forgiveness borrowers can earn, this data will be invaluable in helping Equal Justice Works and a coalition of interested groups advocate for it. The deadline for completing the survey is March 2, but please complete it as soon as possible in case Congress acts sooner. Thank you for your help on this urgent issue!

Keep Up To Date on Student Debt Issues!

Make sure to follow Equal Justice Work’s new blog on the Huffington Post to keep up to date on student debt issues. They’ve been writing recently about “Affording College in a Time of Income Inequality,” “3 Student Loan Repayment Plans You Need to Know About,” and “8 Lessons We Learned About Student Debt From the Class of 2013.”

Start off your February with new job opportunities throughout the U.S. and abroad!

Access to Justice seeking Attorney with at least three years of post-grad experience!

This position is located in the Access to Justice Initiative (ATJ). Established in 2010, ATJ serves as  a catalyst within the Department of Justice to marshal the power and resources of the Federal Government to secure fair and efficient outcomes for all in the justice system, regardless of wealth or status. ATJ staff work within the Department of Justice, across federal agencies, and with state, local, tribal, and international justice system stakeholders to increase access to counsel and legal assistance and to improve the justice system for people who are unable to afford lawyers.

The Attorney-Advisor works under the general supervision of the supervisor. The Attorney-Advisor and his/her supervisor develop a mutually acceptable project plan which typically identifies the work to be done, the scope of the project, and deadline for its completion. Within the parameters of the approved project plan, the Attorney-Advisor is responsible for planning and organizing the work, coordinating with staff and management personnel, and working with others both inside and outside ATJ as necessary to complete the work. The Attorney-Advisor is responsible for reporting problems to the supervisor and bringing any unanticipated issues to the supervisor’s attention. Completed projects, evaluations, reports or recommendations are reviewed by the supervisor for compatibility with organizational goals, guidelines, presentation, and effectiveness in achieving intended objectives.

Internship – International Criminal Court (ICC) Programme

REDRESS is currently seeking applications from law graduates and LLM students with a strong background in international law to work on its International Criminal Court (ICC) programme. Due to the particular work of the ICC Programme, the Legal Intern working on the ICC Programme must have excellent written French. The legal intern will be based in The Hague and be hosted in the offices of the Coalition for the International Criminal Court.

REDRESS legal interns working on the ICC Programme will work with REDRESS programme staff on a variety of assignments, including monitoring of victim-specific ICC jurisprudence in view of producing quasi-monthly “Legal Updates”, work on the Victims’ Rights Working Group Bulletin “ACCESS” published by REDRESS twice a year, background research for reports and submissions and other related projects. Also, the Hague based intern will also be tasked with attending relevant ICC and diplomatic meetings in The Hague and provide support to advocacy efforts.

More information on REDRESS’ work can be found on its website at: www.redress.org and on its work on the ICC at:www.vrwg.org

Kitsap Prosecuting Attorney’s Office seeking summer externs/interns – applications accepted on rolling basis

The Kitsap Prosecuting Attorney’s Office prosecutes all felonies and misdemeanors in Kitsap County, advise and represent all of the County’s elected officials and departments, provide legal advice to all county law enforcement agencies, establish and enforce child support obligations and provide victim and witness assistance services.  For more information on crime victims, see our Crime Victims section, Frequently Asked Questions and Useful Links.

In criminal matters, we represent the interests of the people of the State by ensuring that offenders within the county are timely charged with crimes that accurately reflect the offending conduct, and further, by taking all steps necessary to ensure that the conduct is appropriately punished.

Our Civil Division acts as the law firm representing the County and its agencies. The Civil Division advises and represents all of the County’s elected officials and departments on legal matters. The range of legal representation provided by the Civil Division is expansive and covers virtually every aspect of civil law.

The office is seeking 1L and 2L summer interns/externs. Applicants should email their resume, cover letter to Emily Jarchow at ejarchow@co.kitsap.wa.us. Applications reviewed on a rolling basis.

Due Feb. 9: FIAN International Traineeship Vacancy – Communications/Project Coordination

FIAN International is an international human rights organization that has advocated for the realization of the right to adequate food and nutrition for nearly 30 years. FIAN’s mission is to expose violations of people’s right to adequate food and nutrition wherever they may occur. FIAN’s International Secretariat offices are based in Heidelberg, Germany and Geneva, Switzerland. FIAN International has 19 national sections in Africa, Asia, Latin America and Europe. www.fian.org

FIAN International is currently looking for a trainee to assist in the development of the 2015 edition of the publication Right to Food and Nutrition Watch (hereinafter the Watch), published by a Consortium of twenty civil society organizations and social movements;and to support FIAN International’s Communications Team. The trainee will work full-time (40 hours/week) and be based at the International Secretariat’s office in Heidelberg, Germany. The traineeship period is for one year, starting from 1 April, 2015.

Due Feb. 10: IMMIGRANT AND REFUGEE PROGRAM SERVICES COORDINATOR – CITY ATTORNEY’S OFFICE  (AURORA, CO)

The Office of City Manager is looking for an Immigrant and Refugee Program Services Coordinator to provide outreach to Aurora’s immigrant and refugee community; serve as liaison between the City and Aurora Sister Cities International; coordinate participation in Immigrant/Refugee Task Force; serve as a liaison to the International Round table, assisting in the formulation of an annual work plan, producing meeting minutes, and generally staffing the Round table; serve as liaison to the Aurora Welcome Center;manage any MOU and/or service agreement between the City and the Center; assist in the coordination of City-wide translation services; assist in the planning and execution of Aurora Global Fest in coordination with the international community and appropriate city departments.

Due Feb. 17: City of Seattle – Equity and Environment Initiative 

The City of Seattle is launching a new Equity & Environment Initiative to advance racial and environmental equity in our community.  The Office of Sustainability & Environment has created a new position, Equity & Environment Program Manager, to work with City departments and offices and community partners to move the needle on equity in Seattle’s environmental work.

We are looking for someone who combines strong management, policy, and stakeholder engagement skills with experience working on racial equity and/or environmental justice.  If you or someone you know matches this description, please encourage them to visit this link to learn more and apply.  The posting is scheduled to close 2/17/15.

Due March 1: U.S. DOJ Executive Office for Immigration Review – Tacoma Immigration Court

The Tacoma Immigration Court has an opening for a Summer 2015 volunteer legal intern. The internship will entail in-depth research and analysis of novel legal issues, as well as preparation of legal memoranda for the immigration judges. Interns will have an opportunity to draft several decisions that will be taken under advisement by an immigration judge. Interns can expect to complete assignments that may later be used as writing samples. In addition, interns will be able to observe a variety of matters brought before the court. The intern will work under the supervision of the court’s judicial law clerks but will also have substantial interaction with the individual immigration judges.

Interested students must submit the following information by March 1, 2015:
(1) a cover letter detailing their interest in the internship,
(2) resume,
(3) 5-10 page writing sample,
(4) law school transcript (unofficial acceptable), and
(5) contact information for three references.

Please submit application materials and direct inquiries to Melissa Tuttle (melissa.tuttle@usdoj.gov) or Julia Hunter (Julia.hunter@usdoj.gov). You may also contact Melissa and Julie by phone at (253) 779-6020 if you have any additional questions.