Fill your heart with these public service opportunities this Valentine’s day

2/17: Social Justice Tuesday – “Caught in the Middle: Accessing legal service when you aren’t low income enough”

SJTJoin us in Room 127 at 12:30pm for this presentation about legal services that are available to people of “moderate means.” People who are very low income may be eligible for free legal aid. But for people just above those free legal aid eligibility guidelines, the options are practically nonexistent and yet these people who do not have sufficient income to pay market rates for a lawyer. Come hear from lawyers and students who have a found a way to bridge this justice gap.

 Panelists include: Celeste Miller (WSBA low bono section), Vincent Humphries (Moderate Means Program), and Lauren Matzelle (Bridging the Gap – student intern). If you would like lunch please RSVP via Symplicity or gatespsl@uw.edu RSVP by 12:00 pm Monday, February 16, 2015.

2/19: The Joint Legislative Audit and Review Committee (JLARC) Information Session

Please join us to learn more about the Joint Legislative Audit and ReviewCommittee (JLARC) in Room 118 at 12:30PM.  JLARC is a bipartisan and bicameral committee of the Washington State Legislature.  Nonpartisan JLARC staff evaluate the performance of state agencies and programs to make government more effective, efficient, and accountable.  One of JLARC’s long-term assignments is to review Washington’s tax preferences (e.g., exemptions, deductions, and credits).

 JLARC is seeking a qualified legal intern or extern for the summer of 2013 to perform legal research for the tax preference reviews, under the supervision of JLARC’s research attorneys and analysts.

 The intern will have an opportunity to: Gain in-depth knowledge of Washington State tax laws, policies, and history; assist the Citizen Commission for Performance Review of Tax Preferences; and make valuable professional contacts in state government.

Please RSVP via Symplicity or gatespsl@uw.edu

 2/19 – Deadline: Funding for UW Law Students is Available for: Citizen University National Conference!

Let’s rekindle citizenship in America! March 20 & 21, 2015. The events Friday, March 20 at 6:30pm will take place at Fisher Pavilion – Seattle Center.

This annual national conference is like no other civic gathering in America. Hundreds of change-makers, activists, and catalysts show up to learn about power, build their networks, and recharge their sense of purpose. They come from across the country, the political spectrum, and a wide range of domains — from immigrant rights to national service, voting reform to veteran re-integration, civic education to Hollywood and tech. They are you.

This is a time when citizens are solving problems in new ways, bypassing broken institutions, stale ideologies, and polarized politics. We are part of a movement to rekindle citizenship in America. We hope you’ll join us

Bring a water bottle, wear comfortable clothing and shoes, and learn how to practice powerful citizenship! http://www.citizenuniversity.us/conference/If you wish to attend send your request and resume to mestorms@uw.edu by February 19, 11:59 pm.

2/25: Immigration 101 – Training for Social Service Providers

This training is designed especially for individuals who work with and serve the immigrant community and who want to learn more about the immigration system, immigration enforcement, and how immigration issues affect the community! 

Topics to be addressed include: an overview of our immigration system and immigration status, how does the President’s new actions on immigration affect the community?, what barriers prevent immigrants from accessing services?, what happens when people are detained by immigration authorities?, what protections are available to immigrant victims of crime and survivors of domestic violence?, what protections are available for immigrant youth?, what resources are available in the community to help?, and more!

Note: This training is NOT intended for attorneys and CLE credit is not available.  The training is intended for social service providers in non-legal fields who want general information and resources to refer community members to qualified legal service providers. Join us on February 25 from 1:00-5:00 PM at New Holly Gathering Hall (7054 32nd Ave S., Seattle, WA, 98118).

A registration fee ($25) is required for this training, but scholarships are available (see the Register Now link for more details). We hope to see you there!  

De-stress this hump day with fellowships, volunteer opportunities, and some reading material

Due 2/13: Michael Maggio Immigrants’ Rights Summer Fellowship 

Since its inception in 2009, the Michael Maggio Immigrants’ Rights Summer Fellowship Program has awarded a dedicated law school student each summer the opportunity to engage in a self-initiated project that strengthens their commitment for advocacy and promotes justice and equality for vulnerable immigrant groups. The Fellowship was established by the Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law (CHRCL), the National Immigration Project of the National Lawyers Guild (NIP/NLG), and the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) to commemorate the life and legal contributions of Michael Maggio and to continue his pursuit for equality and peace. The Fellowship is a wonderful opportunity for any law school student who is driven to raise awareness and fight for the underserved immigrant community.

  The Fellowship awards $2,500 to a law student to work on an immigration related student-initiated project. Applicants must submit a project proposal with an organization willing to host the student for 10 weeks during the summer. The student’s proposal must include a collaborative plan with the host organization to partially match the Fellowship award in the amount of $1,500. This matching may be done by either direct stipend by the host organization or through other means, e.g., law school public interest funding, independent fundraising, etc. This ensures that the student will receive a total funding in the amount of $4,000.

 To learn more about the Fellowship and to download the application form, select here. Also, please visit www.maggiofellowship.org to learn more about Michael Maggio, and to download the application and instructions in Microsoft Word format.

 If you have specific questions about the fellowship program, please contact Marchela Iahdjian, Staff Attorney at marchela@centerforhumanrights.org and Peter Schey, President of the Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law at pschey@centerforhumanrights.org. 

Just What Does it Mean to Lead with your Best Self? by Dan Mulhern

February 9, 2015, Everyday Leadership

Dan MulhernI have been signing-off Reading for Leading for 15 years with the line “lead with your best self.” What do I mean by that? And, more importantly, what do you take from it?

Here is perhaps the acid test of leading with your best self. A story. I moved back to Detroit when I was 28. Ten years earlier, I had left for college, then run a neighborhood center in New Orleans, gone to law school, and returned, impassioned to make a difference in my home city. I really thought I knew a lot, and I wanted to challenge the way things were running which, at the same, seemed abysmal. I got a great job in county government, got active in school board politics, and was reaching out to find out how I could contribute. Somebody told me I should meet with Detroit’s director of parks and recreation; he was a minister, a great guy, I was told. And he agreed to have lunch with me.

I remember that I was confrontative. I wondered, perhaps rudely, how he could deal with the city’s seeming complacency, as more people moved out, racial animosities continued to divide us, schools were being closed, and crime was the only consistent thing going. He din’t take the bait, never got defensive. All he did was encourage me! All he did was ask me my thoughts and opinions. All he did was calmly explain what he and others were trying to accomplish and ask what I thought and how I could help. His kindness disarmed me. His intellectual curiosity kept me from maintaining my judgmental attitude and arrogance. That was in 1988.

I was lucky enough to have my life thread in and around Dan Krichbaum’s for the next 26 years. I am still terribly shook that he was hit by two strokes — and died last week. I honestly can’t imagine Detroit and Michigan and the world without him. Continue reading here.

Help by volunteering at El Centro de la Raza with LBAW’s Legal Clinic

LBAWLBAW is in great need of volunteers (attorneys, law students, translators) for this month’s Legal Clinic on Wednesday, February 11th.  We expect that many people will show up for consultations and we need your help! PLEASE consider volunteering this month and throughout 2015.  The Clinic takes place the 2nd Wednesday of each month at El Centro.

Don’t speak Spanish??  No sweat!  We will provide you with a translator. Just complete the Volunteer Application.  Attorneys needed in the following practice areas:

  • Family Law *especially high need in this area*
  • Immigration
  • Criminal Law *especially high need in this area*
  • Personal Injury
  • Employment Law
  • Property/Landlord Tenant *especially high need in this area*

Law Students and translators needed for intakes and translation.  If you would like to help in another way, please let us know.

Due: 3/16 –2015-2017 Jerry Shestack Justice Fellowship

The Jerry Shestack Justice Fellowship is a two-year litigation-focused fellowship that will be selected on a bi-annual basis by the Lawyers’ Committee in consultation with the Shestack Justice Advisory Committee. Jerry Shestack was an extraordinary lawyer and a driving force in advancing the cause of civil and human rights. One of his greatest legacies was his central role in the founding of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law in 1963.

 Law school graduates who have passed the bar and have 2 to 3 years of outstanding litigation experience and/or judicial clerkships are eligible. The chosen Fellow will have demonstrated a passion and commitment to civil rights issues and public service and have shown promise of becoming an exceptional litigator. Fellows are paid at the same salary of Lawyers’ Committee attorneys with the same number of years of experience.

How to Apply:  Applications are due on March 16, 2015. We expect to announce the successful applicant in June. The Shestack Fellow will begin working at the Lawyers’ Committee in fall 2015. Please apply at https://podio.com/webforms/10775370/768081. Applications must include the following materials:

  • Resume
  • Law school transcript
  • Two page letter of intent
  • Two letters of recommendation
  • Writing sample

This oppressed, unjust (U.S.) American life by Shafaq Hasan

From Nonprofit Quarterly and National Public Radio, WUWM (Milwaukee, WI) 

Increasingly, some outlets are using longer-form journalism to bring their readers or listeners more deeply into an issue. This American Life is one of those outlets, despite the recent kerfuffle about its journalistic chops.

As outgoing Attorney General Eric Holder spends his last few weeks in office speaking to civilians about community relations with their local police departments, the issue is also taking center stage in a new podcast series by This American Life, a weekly radio program recently popularized by the true crime podcast, Serial.

Narrated by Brian Reed, the new two-part series, “Cops See It Differently,” was launched online last Friday and delves into the contentious relations between police departments and their communities, particularly minority communities. It’s an issue that erupted into public discourse last year following the deaths of Eric Garner and Michael Brown, leading to the Black Lives Matter movement.

This first part of the series focuses on the police department in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and ardent, good-intentioned police chief Ed Flynn in particular. By the time he came into the position back in 2008, there were already deep-seated tensions underlying community and police relations in Milwaukee, a city with a great racial divide.

The episode takes listeners through some of the Milwaukee department’s more controversial policing moments, such as the death of 22-year-old Derrick Williams, who died in the back of a squad car after telling officers, “I can’t breathe.” (That’s right; Milwaukee had its own Eric Garner three years before the Staten Island case.) The episode also looks into the aftermath of the police shooting death of mentally ill Dontre Hamilton, which resulted in the firing of the officer and a heated town hall meeting that was frustrating for both the community and police department.

But it’s the prologue of the series that provides the most succinct depiction of how many minorities feel about local police officers. Back in September, Lisa Mahone of Hammond, Indiana, her two children, and her friend Jamal Jones were pulled over for a routine traffic stop that escalated to police officers pulling their guns and demanding Mahone step out of the car. Fearing for her life, Mahone called 911—on the police officers. Continue reading here.

This Valentine’s Week, treat yourself to some new amazing public service experiences

Apply Today for the Washington Bus Fellowship to learn about grassroots organization!

If you or a young person in your life (18-25) is looking for a transformative experience this summer, check out the Washington Bus’s Fellowship–a ten-week paid political, social justice, and community building program where young folks learn practical grassroots organizing skills and put them to work influencing progressive change in Seattle! Fellows will participate in hands-on activities and work with progressive leaders from across the state. The application can be found here.

Summer 2015 International Human Rights Law Internship 

Americans for Democracy and Human Rights in Bahrain (ADHRB) is a seeking a creative, organized, passionate, and hard-working legal intern for its Washington, DC office for the summer. Interns will: prepare client complaints for documentation with the Special Procedures of the United Nations; identify and research pertinent domestic and international law; prepare research memoranda on United Nations systems; assist with client interviews as necessary; assist the advocacy team as necessary; and assist with administrative duties as required.

Please email a resume, cover letter, excerpted legal brief (10 pages max.) to internships [at] adhrb.org with the subject lineLEGAL EXTERN APPLICATION. We would additionally welcome any papers that a student has written analyzing international human rights law.

Nez Perce Tribe’s Office of Legal Counsel seeks Staff Attorney

The Nez Perce Tribe’s Office of Legal Counsel offers an active and dynamic opportunity to assist the Tribe in protecting and advancing in sovereignty and treaty rights. The Office is seeking a staff attorney at its office in Lapwai, Idaho to join its team. The new hire is expected to immediately assume responsibility for handling a substantial work load, primarily involving natural resource issues related to the protection and advancement of tribal sovereignty and treaty-reserved rights. The work load includes handling an active litigation docket and providing legal counsel on a broad variety of issues associated with the Tribe’s interests. The new staff attorney will also be responsible for tasks delegated by the Managing Attorney. A complete application includes: resume, writing sample, and three letters of reference to – Lee Bourgeau, Director, Human Resources, RE: Staff Attorney, No., HR 15-108, P.O. Box 365, Lapwai, Idaho, 83540 by 4:30 PM on February 27. For more information contact the Managing Attorney, Julie S. Kane at juliek@nezperce.org

Due 2/15: Entry Level Attorney position at Department of Homeland Security

Do you desire to be a part of the vibrant United States immigrant admission process, to protect American interests, and to secure our Nation while building a meaningful and rewarding career? If so, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), and its Office of the Chief Counsel (OCC) are calling.

As part of both USCIS and the DHS Office of the General Counsel, you will work with other highly talented attorneys and colleagues on a rich array of intellectually challenging, critically important, cutting edge legal issues. DHS components work collectively, and USCIS strives, to enforce and administer immigration laws fairly, efficiently, and in keeping with the law, at the same time that we seek to prevent terrorism, secure borders, safeguard cyberspace and ensure resilience to disasters. The vitality and magnitude of this mission are achieved by a diverse workforce spanning hundreds of occupations. Make an impact; join OCC, USCIS, and DHS!

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Office of the Chief Counsel, Department of Homeland Security (DHS), is seeking recent law schools graduates since January 1, 2012 with more than 1 year of post-JD experience for an entry level attorney position in New York, NY as an Associate Counsel with the Northeastern Law Division (NELD).  The position is supervised by a NELD Deputy Chief and the NELD Chief.

Due 2/18: Become the Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) Specialist in King County

 incumbent is responsible for supporting volunteers who are Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) in child abuse and neglect cases. Will supervise CASA volunteers, conduct case management, train, and provide support in court. Primary emphasis is placed on volunteer supervision. This is a paid, full-time position in King County Superior Court. To apply, click here.

Due 2/27: Become a Global Advocacy Adviser for the Center of Reproductive Rights

Founded in 1992, the Center for Reproductive Rights (the Center) is a non-profit organization that promotes women’s equality worldwide by securing reproductive rights in constitutional and international human rights law. Its mission is straightforward and ambitious: to advance reproductive health and rights as fundamental rights that all governments are legally obligated to protect, respect and fulfill. The Center is unmatched as a reproductive rights organization in its expertise in U.S. constitutional law, comparative law, and international human rights law.

The Center’s Global Legal Program has brought groundbreaking cases before national courts, U.N. committees, and regional human rights bodies, and has built the legal capacity of women’s rights advocates in over 50 countries.  The Global Advocacy Adviser will be joining the Center at a critical time for reproductive rights globally. To learn more about the Center for Reproductive Rights, go to www.reproductiverights.org. The Center seeks a Global Advocacy Adviser who will support the work of the Global Advocacy team in the Global Legal Program, and will report to the Director of Global Advocacy.

Please click on this link to apply.  A cover letter, résumé, writing sample in English (unedited and preferably relevant to international human rights advocacy) and contact information for three references must be included in your application in order to be considered for this position.  Please include these application materials as attachments.

Are there “good” prosecutors? How does the media impact female attorneys? What can you do in environmental law? Answer all of these questions with next week’s thought-provoking events!

2/9: Why Prosecutors Might Do Bad Things? Gates Public Service Law Speaker Series with Professor Alafair Burke

Professor Burke, Professor of Law and Hofstra Research Fellow at Hofstra University teaches criminal law and criminal procedure subjects. Her research intersects criminal law and procedure and focuses on policing and prosecutorial policies. She has written about prosecutorial decision making, community policing and non-punitive responses to crime problems, and the criminal law’s treatment of domestic violence, both in punishing batterers and in explaining the conduct of battered women.

Before joining the law school faculty in 2001, Professor Burke served as a deputy district attorney in Portland, Oregon, where she tried more than 30 criminal cases, primarily against domestic violence offenders, and helped innovate neighborhood-based prosecution methods.

Co-sponsored by the King County Prosecutor’s Office

RSVP via Symplicity or gatespsl@uw.edu

2/10: Social Justice Tuesday – Under the Spotlight: Media’s Portrayal of Female Attorneys  

SJTAre media portrayals of female attorneys harmful? Is it time to shift the conversation and stop talking about appearance? Join the Center for Public Service Law, the Dean’s Advisory Committee on Diversity, and the Womens’ Law Caucus for this vibrant panel discussion and share your thoughts on the media, its influence, and the direction the legal community should take to address gender issues in the media. Speakers include: Michelle Gonzalez (Assistant Dean UW Law), Chelsea Petersen (Perkins Coie), and Judge Susan Craighead has been invited. The event will be at 12:30 PM in Room 127.

2/11: Careers in Environmental Law 

Please join Environmental Law Society, Environmental Law Program, Center for Professionalism & Leadership Development, and Center for Public Service Law for this exciting panel on February 11 at 12:30 PM in Room 127 to answer some of your burning questions about pursuing a career in environmental law, including: what are the top and cutting-edge issues in environmental law today? What are some of the best strategies for law students interested in a career in environmental law? Panelists will include Valerie K. Rickman (Cascadia Law Group PLLC), Laura Watson (WA Attorney General’s Office), Marcus Pearson (Plauche & Carr LLP), Cliff Villa (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency), and Linda Larson (Marten Law). We hope to see you there!

Take a trip to California or find a new way to use that J.D. with these exciting opportunities!

AmeriCorps JD is now accepting applicants! 

We will accept applications through April 15, 2015 from students, who not only work in the priority areas defined below, but who provide service to low-income communities in other areas of law. The 300 service hours required to earn the education award can be completed anytime from when the application is accepted and the background check has been initiated through August 31, 2015.

PRIORITY AREAS: Priority will be given to applications from students who are serving veterans, military families or victims of disasters, or focusing on removing barriers to employment or housing. However, we also have many spots available for students working with other populations and in other areas of law.

Some more examples of the type of work students can do within these priority areas include:

  • Direct legal services: intake, legal form preparation, performing client and witness interviews, advocating for clients by telephone and in person, attending hearings, assisting attorneys in legal representation, carrying out legal research and writing
  • Outreach and education: developing and distributing fact sheets, developing and delivering training on legal topics or on how to access legal services, ensuring potential clients are aware of their rights and available services
  • Capacity building: activities which build the capacity of your host organization or other organizations to provide services in the previously specified priority areas, such as an organizational assessment, compiling best practices, organizing focus groups, leading planning committees

You can also learn more about organizations and the legal services being provided for veterans, disaster, and employment issues by viewing our Fellow profiles on our website.

The AmeriCorps program, under the Corporation for National and Community Service, has a list of prohibited activities that cannot be included in the hours of service completed to earn the Segal AmeriCorps Education Award. A list of these activities can be found here.

Students serving in the priority areas or other issue areas may apply now through Wednesday, April 15, 2015. Visit our website for more information about the application process. Questions may be directed to AmeriCorpsJD@equaljusticeworks.org.

UW Law Students: Re-ignite your Social Justice Heart and Vision at the Annual Trina Grillo Retreat in Sunny Santa Clara, CA!

The Trina Grillo Retreat at Santa Clara Law (March 20-21, 2015) provides a unique opportunity for public interest and social-justice oriented law students, faculty, and practitioners to forge an alliance by exchanging viewpoints, exploring career opportunities, and formulating strategies for social justice.

Join with law students from several west coast law schools to re-imagine the next generation of social justice lawyering.  Funding up to $250 in reimbursement is available for UW Law students interested in attending.  Send a letter of interest and resume to mestorms@uw.edu by Feb 20 noon  if you would like to attend.

Attention Recent Grads! You Can Help Preserve Public Service Loan Forgiveness

Please don’t forget to fill out and pass on Equal Justice Works’ quick survey about the effect of Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) on your career. While they hear anecdotally how critical PSLF is to making long term public interest careers possible, there is little hard data on the program’s impact. If Congress does propose capping the amount of forgiveness borrowers can earn, this data will be invaluable in helping Equal Justice Works and a coalition of interested groups advocate for it. The deadline for completing the survey is March 2, but please complete it as soon as possible in case Congress acts sooner. Thank you for your help on this urgent issue!

Keep Up To Date on Student Debt Issues!

Make sure to follow Equal Justice Work’s new blog on the Huffington Post to keep up to date on student debt issues. They’ve been writing recently about “Affording College in a Time of Income Inequality,” “3 Student Loan Repayment Plans You Need to Know About,” and “8 Lessons We Learned About Student Debt From the Class of 2013.”

Start off your February with new job opportunities throughout the U.S. and abroad!

Access to Justice seeking Attorney with at least three years of post-grad experience!

This position is located in the Access to Justice Initiative (ATJ). Established in 2010, ATJ serves as  a catalyst within the Department of Justice to marshal the power and resources of the Federal Government to secure fair and efficient outcomes for all in the justice system, regardless of wealth or status. ATJ staff work within the Department of Justice, across federal agencies, and with state, local, tribal, and international justice system stakeholders to increase access to counsel and legal assistance and to improve the justice system for people who are unable to afford lawyers.

The Attorney-Advisor works under the general supervision of the supervisor. The Attorney-Advisor and his/her supervisor develop a mutually acceptable project plan which typically identifies the work to be done, the scope of the project, and deadline for its completion. Within the parameters of the approved project plan, the Attorney-Advisor is responsible for planning and organizing the work, coordinating with staff and management personnel, and working with others both inside and outside ATJ as necessary to complete the work. The Attorney-Advisor is responsible for reporting problems to the supervisor and bringing any unanticipated issues to the supervisor’s attention. Completed projects, evaluations, reports or recommendations are reviewed by the supervisor for compatibility with organizational goals, guidelines, presentation, and effectiveness in achieving intended objectives.

Internship – International Criminal Court (ICC) Programme

REDRESS is currently seeking applications from law graduates and LLM students with a strong background in international law to work on its International Criminal Court (ICC) programme. Due to the particular work of the ICC Programme, the Legal Intern working on the ICC Programme must have excellent written French. The legal intern will be based in The Hague and be hosted in the offices of the Coalition for the International Criminal Court.

REDRESS legal interns working on the ICC Programme will work with REDRESS programme staff on a variety of assignments, including monitoring of victim-specific ICC jurisprudence in view of producing quasi-monthly “Legal Updates”, work on the Victims’ Rights Working Group Bulletin “ACCESS” published by REDRESS twice a year, background research for reports and submissions and other related projects. Also, the Hague based intern will also be tasked with attending relevant ICC and diplomatic meetings in The Hague and provide support to advocacy efforts.

More information on REDRESS’ work can be found on its website at: www.redress.org and on its work on the ICC at:www.vrwg.org

Kitsap Prosecuting Attorney’s Office seeking summer externs/interns – applications accepted on rolling basis

The Kitsap Prosecuting Attorney’s Office prosecutes all felonies and misdemeanors in Kitsap County, advise and represent all of the County’s elected officials and departments, provide legal advice to all county law enforcement agencies, establish and enforce child support obligations and provide victim and witness assistance services.  For more information on crime victims, see our Crime Victims section, Frequently Asked Questions and Useful Links.

In criminal matters, we represent the interests of the people of the State by ensuring that offenders within the county are timely charged with crimes that accurately reflect the offending conduct, and further, by taking all steps necessary to ensure that the conduct is appropriately punished.

Our Civil Division acts as the law firm representing the County and its agencies. The Civil Division advises and represents all of the County’s elected officials and departments on legal matters. The range of legal representation provided by the Civil Division is expansive and covers virtually every aspect of civil law.

The office is seeking 1L and 2L summer interns/externs. Applicants should email their resume, cover letter to Emily Jarchow at ejarchow@co.kitsap.wa.us. Applications reviewed on a rolling basis.

Due Feb. 9: FIAN International Traineeship Vacancy – Communications/Project Coordination

FIAN International is an international human rights organization that has advocated for the realization of the right to adequate food and nutrition for nearly 30 years. FIAN’s mission is to expose violations of people’s right to adequate food and nutrition wherever they may occur. FIAN’s International Secretariat offices are based in Heidelberg, Germany and Geneva, Switzerland. FIAN International has 19 national sections in Africa, Asia, Latin America and Europe. www.fian.org

FIAN International is currently looking for a trainee to assist in the development of the 2015 edition of the publication Right to Food and Nutrition Watch (hereinafter the Watch), published by a Consortium of twenty civil society organizations and social movements;and to support FIAN International’s Communications Team. The trainee will work full-time (40 hours/week) and be based at the International Secretariat’s office in Heidelberg, Germany. The traineeship period is for one year, starting from 1 April, 2015.

Due Feb. 10: IMMIGRANT AND REFUGEE PROGRAM SERVICES COORDINATOR – CITY ATTORNEY’S OFFICE  (AURORA, CO)

The Office of City Manager is looking for an Immigrant and Refugee Program Services Coordinator to provide outreach to Aurora’s immigrant and refugee community; serve as liaison between the City and Aurora Sister Cities International; coordinate participation in Immigrant/Refugee Task Force; serve as a liaison to the International Round table, assisting in the formulation of an annual work plan, producing meeting minutes, and generally staffing the Round table; serve as liaison to the Aurora Welcome Center;manage any MOU and/or service agreement between the City and the Center; assist in the coordination of City-wide translation services; assist in the planning and execution of Aurora Global Fest in coordination with the international community and appropriate city departments.

Due Feb. 17: City of Seattle – Equity and Environment Initiative 

The City of Seattle is launching a new Equity & Environment Initiative to advance racial and environmental equity in our community.  The Office of Sustainability & Environment has created a new position, Equity & Environment Program Manager, to work with City departments and offices and community partners to move the needle on equity in Seattle’s environmental work.

We are looking for someone who combines strong management, policy, and stakeholder engagement skills with experience working on racial equity and/or environmental justice.  If you or someone you know matches this description, please encourage them to visit this link to learn more and apply.  The posting is scheduled to close 2/17/15.

Due March 1: U.S. DOJ Executive Office for Immigration Review – Tacoma Immigration Court

The Tacoma Immigration Court has an opening for a Summer 2015 volunteer legal intern. The internship will entail in-depth research and analysis of novel legal issues, as well as preparation of legal memoranda for the immigration judges. Interns will have an opportunity to draft several decisions that will be taken under advisement by an immigration judge. Interns can expect to complete assignments that may later be used as writing samples. In addition, interns will be able to observe a variety of matters brought before the court. The intern will work under the supervision of the court’s judicial law clerks but will also have substantial interaction with the individual immigration judges.

Interested students must submit the following information by March 1, 2015:
(1) a cover letter detailing their interest in the internship,
(2) resume,
(3) 5-10 page writing sample,
(4) law school transcript (unofficial acceptable), and
(5) contact information for three references.

Please submit application materials and direct inquiries to Melissa Tuttle (melissa.tuttle@usdoj.gov) or Julia Hunter (Julia.hunter@usdoj.gov). You may also contact Melissa and Julie by phone at (253) 779-6020 if you have any additional questions.