De-stress this hump day with fellowships, volunteer opportunities, and some reading material

Due 2/13: Michael Maggio Immigrants’ Rights Summer Fellowship 

Since its inception in 2009, the Michael Maggio Immigrants’ Rights Summer Fellowship Program has awarded a dedicated law school student each summer the opportunity to engage in a self-initiated project that strengthens their commitment for advocacy and promotes justice and equality for vulnerable immigrant groups. The Fellowship was established by the Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law (CHRCL), the National Immigration Project of the National Lawyers Guild (NIP/NLG), and the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) to commemorate the life and legal contributions of Michael Maggio and to continue his pursuit for equality and peace. The Fellowship is a wonderful opportunity for any law school student who is driven to raise awareness and fight for the underserved immigrant community.

  The Fellowship awards $2,500 to a law student to work on an immigration related student-initiated project. Applicants must submit a project proposal with an organization willing to host the student for 10 weeks during the summer. The student’s proposal must include a collaborative plan with the host organization to partially match the Fellowship award in the amount of $1,500. This matching may be done by either direct stipend by the host organization or through other means, e.g., law school public interest funding, independent fundraising, etc. This ensures that the student will receive a total funding in the amount of $4,000.

 To learn more about the Fellowship and to download the application form, select here. Also, please visit www.maggiofellowship.org to learn more about Michael Maggio, and to download the application and instructions in Microsoft Word format.

 If you have specific questions about the fellowship program, please contact Marchela Iahdjian, Staff Attorney at marchela@centerforhumanrights.org and Peter Schey, President of the Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law at pschey@centerforhumanrights.org. 

Just What Does it Mean to Lead with your Best Self? by Dan Mulhern

February 9, 2015, Everyday Leadership

Dan MulhernI have been signing-off Reading for Leading for 15 years with the line “lead with your best self.” What do I mean by that? And, more importantly, what do you take from it?

Here is perhaps the acid test of leading with your best self. A story. I moved back to Detroit when I was 28. Ten years earlier, I had left for college, then run a neighborhood center in New Orleans, gone to law school, and returned, impassioned to make a difference in my home city. I really thought I knew a lot, and I wanted to challenge the way things were running which, at the same, seemed abysmal. I got a great job in county government, got active in school board politics, and was reaching out to find out how I could contribute. Somebody told me I should meet with Detroit’s director of parks and recreation; he was a minister, a great guy, I was told. And he agreed to have lunch with me.

I remember that I was confrontative. I wondered, perhaps rudely, how he could deal with the city’s seeming complacency, as more people moved out, racial animosities continued to divide us, schools were being closed, and crime was the only consistent thing going. He din’t take the bait, never got defensive. All he did was encourage me! All he did was ask me my thoughts and opinions. All he did was calmly explain what he and others were trying to accomplish and ask what I thought and how I could help. His kindness disarmed me. His intellectual curiosity kept me from maintaining my judgmental attitude and arrogance. That was in 1988.

I was lucky enough to have my life thread in and around Dan Krichbaum’s for the next 26 years. I am still terribly shook that he was hit by two strokes — and died last week. I honestly can’t imagine Detroit and Michigan and the world without him. Continue reading here.

Help by volunteering at El Centro de la Raza with LBAW’s Legal Clinic

LBAWLBAW is in great need of volunteers (attorneys, law students, translators) for this month’s Legal Clinic on Wednesday, February 11th.  We expect that many people will show up for consultations and we need your help! PLEASE consider volunteering this month and throughout 2015.  The Clinic takes place the 2nd Wednesday of each month at El Centro.

Don’t speak Spanish??  No sweat!  We will provide you with a translator. Just complete the Volunteer Application.  Attorneys needed in the following practice areas:

  • Family Law *especially high need in this area*
  • Immigration
  • Criminal Law *especially high need in this area*
  • Personal Injury
  • Employment Law
  • Property/Landlord Tenant *especially high need in this area*

Law Students and translators needed for intakes and translation.  If you would like to help in another way, please let us know.

Due: 3/16 –2015-2017 Jerry Shestack Justice Fellowship

The Jerry Shestack Justice Fellowship is a two-year litigation-focused fellowship that will be selected on a bi-annual basis by the Lawyers’ Committee in consultation with the Shestack Justice Advisory Committee. Jerry Shestack was an extraordinary lawyer and a driving force in advancing the cause of civil and human rights. One of his greatest legacies was his central role in the founding of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law in 1963.

 Law school graduates who have passed the bar and have 2 to 3 years of outstanding litigation experience and/or judicial clerkships are eligible. The chosen Fellow will have demonstrated a passion and commitment to civil rights issues and public service and have shown promise of becoming an exceptional litigator. Fellows are paid at the same salary of Lawyers’ Committee attorneys with the same number of years of experience.

How to Apply:  Applications are due on March 16, 2015. We expect to announce the successful applicant in June. The Shestack Fellow will begin working at the Lawyers’ Committee in fall 2015. Please apply at https://podio.com/webforms/10775370/768081. Applications must include the following materials:

  • Resume
  • Law school transcript
  • Two page letter of intent
  • Two letters of recommendation
  • Writing sample

This oppressed, unjust (U.S.) American life by Shafaq Hasan

From Nonprofit Quarterly and National Public Radio, WUWM (Milwaukee, WI) 

Increasingly, some outlets are using longer-form journalism to bring their readers or listeners more deeply into an issue. This American Life is one of those outlets, despite the recent kerfuffle about its journalistic chops.

As outgoing Attorney General Eric Holder spends his last few weeks in office speaking to civilians about community relations with their local police departments, the issue is also taking center stage in a new podcast series by This American Life, a weekly radio program recently popularized by the true crime podcast, Serial.

Narrated by Brian Reed, the new two-part series, “Cops See It Differently,” was launched online last Friday and delves into the contentious relations between police departments and their communities, particularly minority communities. It’s an issue that erupted into public discourse last year following the deaths of Eric Garner and Michael Brown, leading to the Black Lives Matter movement.

This first part of the series focuses on the police department in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and ardent, good-intentioned police chief Ed Flynn in particular. By the time he came into the position back in 2008, there were already deep-seated tensions underlying community and police relations in Milwaukee, a city with a great racial divide.

The episode takes listeners through some of the Milwaukee department’s more controversial policing moments, such as the death of 22-year-old Derrick Williams, who died in the back of a squad car after telling officers, “I can’t breathe.” (That’s right; Milwaukee had its own Eric Garner three years before the Staten Island case.) The episode also looks into the aftermath of the police shooting death of mentally ill Dontre Hamilton, which resulted in the firing of the officer and a heated town hall meeting that was frustrating for both the community and police department.

But it’s the prologue of the series that provides the most succinct depiction of how many minorities feel about local police officers. Back in September, Lisa Mahone of Hammond, Indiana, her two children, and her friend Jamal Jones were pulled over for a routine traffic stop that escalated to police officers pulling their guns and demanding Mahone step out of the car. Fearing for her life, Mahone called 911—on the police officers. Continue reading here.