Before you watch “House of Cards” Season 3 today – check out some of these upcoming events!

3/3: Social Justice Tuesday – Educational Debt Relief

SJTConcerned about how you’re going to pay back all of your education loans? Want to learn more about income-based repayment options, public service loan forgiveness and UW Law’s Loan Repayment Assistance Program? Join us Tuesday, March 3 in Room 127 at 12:30 PM. 

 This is the workshop for you! Hear the latest on various resources and programs that are out there to help you manage and reduce education debt. Please RSVP if you plan on attending so we have enough food for everyone!

3/4: Practical Networking Tips: How to Work a Room

Receptions can be overwhelming, especially for the introverts among us. This session will focus on how to make the most of a reception, including how to prepare, how to enter and exit conversations, and what to do the next day.  This will be an interactive workshop with opportunities to practice these new techniques. Participants are also encouraged to attend the Legal Connections Reception in the evening.

Join us Wednesday, March 4 in Room 127 at 12:30 PM. Please RSVP on Symplicity if you are thinking of attending.

3/5: “Humanizing the Other: The Tyra Patterson Story”

For the past 19 years, Tyra Patterson has been incarcerated in the Ohio prison for aggravated murder and robbery, crimes Ohio’s former Attorney General Jim Petro says she likely did not commit.

At trial, Tyra’s defense was ineffectual. Her lawyers refused to introduce the 911 call she had made, and discouraged her from testifying because she, in their words, “talked like she was from the ghetto” and would not be understood by the jury. Not surprisingly the jury convicted her.

The Ohio Justice & Policy Center has been handling Tyra’s case for over a year in an effort to get her clemency. After hearing the 911 call, six of the trial jurors submitted affidavits say- ing that they would likely not have convicted Tyra had that evidence come out at the trial..

Please RSVP and join us for lunch on Thursday, March 5 in Room 127 at 12:30 PM to learn more about this case and David Singleton’s work on obtaining clemency for Tyra Patterson.

3/19: Litigation and Other Strategies to Help Reverse Mortgage Surviving Spouses

Advocates representing widows or widowers that were left off of a reverse mortgage loan taken out by their spouses have been struggling to keep foreclosure at bay. While the Plunkett litigation is ongoing, HUD has long promised a solution addressing this issue for all non-borrowing spouses. With the issuance of Mortgagee Letter 2015-03, it is clear that for most surviving spouses, HUD is extending only the “Mortgagee Optional Election,” wherein the mortgage servicer may assign the mortgage to HUD only if the spouse passes the Principal Limit Factor test. However, surviving spouses who have obtained a court order declaring the HUD regulation invalid as to them have been offered the alternative “Hold Election,” where the servicer can delay foreclosure indefinitely and then assign the loan to HUD when it reaches 98% of the Maximum Claim Amount. This alternative does not require a spouse to pass the Principal Limit Factor test. Hear from attorneys who are litigating these cases about crafting pleadings, litigation strategy, and opportunities to resolve these cases in a way that keeps widows in their homes. We will also explain how to calculate the Principal Limit Factor test in order to determine whether the Mortgagee Optional Election is a viable option for your client. 

Presenters: Sarah Bolling Mancini (National Consumer Law Center), Odette Williamson (National Consumer Law Center), Rachel Scott (Atlanta Legal Aid Society, Inc.) 

Additional sponsorship for this Webinar is provided by a grant from the Administration on Aging/Administration for Community Living. This webinar is part of a series of National Elder Rights Training Project webinars for the National Legal Resource Center. 

There is no charge for this webinar. All time listings are in Eastern Time. If you have any questions email trainings@nclc.orgAfter registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Interested in Learning More about Demographics and Diversity Campus-Wide at UW ? Check Out these Powerful Statistics.

UW students are leading the way across all campuses, schools and programs by organizing and educating around issues of racial justice and diversity. This is week is Diversity Week at UW Law. Here are some powerful statistics compiled by #BLACKLIVESMATTERUW  to help us all think about what this means for our community and for justice.

#BlackLivesMatterUW Stats

Here are additional powerful statistics that shed light on the forces at play in the “school to prison pipeline” rather than a “school to UW pipeline.”

 

#BlackLivesMatter_2

It’s almost spring! Celebrate by pursuing one of these potential jobs!

2/27: Los Angeles Superior Court – Summer Extern

The Superior Court of California, County of Los Angeles is currently accepting applications for summer 2015. Externs for the Superior Court generally work directly with the Superior Court’s judicial officers. Externs are often given the opportunity to research and write legal memoranda on pending law and motion matters, to observe trials and daily law and motion calendars, and to complete special projects.Externships are available in civil, criminal, family, and juvenile courtrooms. Part­time and full­time positions are available.

Interested students should submit a resume, transcript (if available) and writing sample via email. In the text of the email, please indicate your preferred area of law. All materials should be submitted as soon as possible. Positions will be filled on an on­going basis. Materials are accepted via email only and can be sent to: extern@lacourt.org. Please email any questions to extern@lacourt.org.

Students should submit a cover letter, resume, transcript (if available), and short writing sample by February 27th, 2015 to Charisse Brimmer, Supervising Research Attorney, at extern@lacourt.org

2/27: Department of Health and Human Services – Children & Family Services Specialist 

Become a part of the Department that touches the lives of every American! At the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) you can give back to your community, state, and country by making a difference in the lives of Americans everywhere. It is the principal agency for protecting the health of citizens. Join HHS and help to make our world healthier, safer, and better for all Americans.

This position is located in the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Administration for Children and Families (ACF), Office of Family Assistance (OFA), Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) unit, Region III, Philadelphia, PA/Region IX, San Francisco, CA./Region X, Seattle, WA/ Region V Chicago, IL, Region I, Boston, MA.

For more information about the position and the application process, please click here.

Skokomish Tribe Contract Prosecutor Position

The Skokomish Indian Tribe is soliciting applications for a Tribal Prosecutor.  This is a two year contract position, subject to renewal, with a contract rate of four thousand dollars ($4,000) per month.  The contract requires the Tribal Prosecutor to be on site two days per week.  The applicant also must be a member in good standing of a state or territorial bar association.  Please send applications in Microsoft Word and/or Adobe Pdf format to: yoberly@skokomish.org.

Unpaid intern position for Commissioner Burrows

We are currently seeking unpaid legal interns for Spring (immediately), Summer, and Fall 2015. Commissioner Burrows was confirmed on December 2, 2014 and began her tenure in January. Thus, we are just getting settled. With a full Commission, it should be an exiting time and educational experience for law students interested in equal employment opportunity, employment, or civil rights law broadly.   

 If you have any questions, please email us at officeofcommissionerburrows@eeoc.gov.

Staff Attorney – Office of Legislative Counsel (CONGRESS OF THE FEDERATED STATES OF MICRONESIA)

The Congress of the Federated States of Micronesia is seeking a staff attorney to work in the Office of the Legislative Counsel.  The Federated States of Micronesia is an island national located in the Western Pacific Ocean, just north of the equator.  The nation’s lush tropical foliage, coral reefs, and sparkling lagoons make it one of the most beautiful places on earth.  Its capital is located on the island of Pohnpei. More information on the FSM can be found at the FSM Visitor’s Board website at http://www.visit-micronesia.fmThe official website of the FSM Congress is at www.fsmcongress.fm

The responsibilities of a staff attorney include drafting legislation, legal research, providing advice to members of Congress, and working with the Executive Branch of the government on legislative matters.  The work is diverse, ranging from tax and budget legislation to fundamental issues of national social policy.  

Applications, including a cover letter and resume, should be emailed to the hiring committee at cfsmolcjobs@gmail.com. Shortlisted candidates will be contacted.

EQUAL JUSTICE WORKS/JUSTICE AMERICORPS -Legal Fellowship Opportunity

The Equal Justice Works/justice AmeriCorps Legal Fellow will work full-time at the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights of the San Francisco Bay Area and will be responsible for providing full-scope direct representation to unaccompanied immigrant children in Immigration Court proceedings and related proceedings before U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services and in State Court. The term of the fellowship is one year, with the possibility of renewal.

Please submit a cover letter, résumé, brief writing sample, and list of three references; if a recent law school graduate, please include a law school transcript (an unofficial copy is fine). Send complete application to the attention of: Silvia Contreras, Immigrant Justice Program, Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights of the San Francisco Bay Area.  Submission via email to scontreras@lccr.com, with the subject line of “EJW/jAC Fellowship,” is preferred, but applications may alternatively be mailed to 131 Steuart Street, Suite 400, San Francisco, CA 94105.  Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis; position to start as soon as possible.

For more information, please click here.

SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF NEW YORK, OFFICE OF PRO SE LITIGATION – Pro Se Law Clerk

The U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York is hiring one pro se law clerk to serve a two-year term (subject to available funding) for the Office of Pro Se Litigation. The Office of Pro Se Litigation serves the District and Magistrate Judges of the Court in the handling of all cases filed by individuals who are representing themselves in court. It provides legal support to the Court’s judges to assist them in managing their pro se docket (which accounts for approximately 25% of the Court’s civil filings). Pro se law clerks review initial pro se filings and draft legal memoranda and proposed orders and decisions for judicial officers. Pro se law clerks report directly to the Chief Counsel of the Office of Pro Se Litigation.

In addition to providing substantive support to judicial officers, pro se law clerks work on other matters handled by the Office of Pro Se Litigation, including preparing forms, manuals, and other materials to provide assistance to pro se litigants.

Applications must include a cover letter, resume, law-school transcript, list of at least three references, and a recent, self-edited writing sample and be sent by email to PSLC@nysd.uscourts.gov using “Pro Se Law Clerk” as the subject line (all documents should be combined into a single PDF file).

Due to the volume of applications, the Court will communicate only with those individuals who will be interviewed for open positions. For more information, click here

3/16: NAACP – John Payton Appellate and Supreme Court Advocacy Fellowship

The John Payton Appellate and Supreme Court Advocacy Fellowship provides a mid-level lawyer with the opportunity to spend a year as a staff attorney at  LDF litigating cutting-edge civil rights cases.

 We’ll be accepting applications until March 16, 2015 and would welcome any help you might be able to offer in spreading the word or recommending good candidates.  Please find more information here.

Robert L. Carter Fellowship 

The Opportunity Agenda seeks candidates for the Robert L. Carter fellowship, for a two-year term beginning no later than September of 2015 for its New York office. The Opportunity Agenda is a social justice communication lab that collaborates with social justice leaders to move hearts and minds, driving lasting policy and culture change. We amplify the inspirational voice of opportunity through a combination of communication expertise, creative engagement and research.

Working under the supervision of the Director of Law and Advocacy, and in coordination with other program and development staff, this position’s responsibilities include:

The Fellow will participate in legal research and legal advocacy; work with coalitions on framing and messaging concerns; and collaborate with local and national public interest organizations and policymakers on policy and communications efforts. The Fellow will focus on promoting equal opportunity and protecting human rights in such sectors as economic opportunity and immigration and criminal justice policy. Activities are likely to include conducting research and writing legal and policy briefs; helping to create communications strategies and tools; and engaging in policy advocacy, often in partnership with coalition allies. This work will be done in close collaboration with The Opportunity Agenda’s legal, research, and communications staff, providing opportunities for social science research and media experience, as well as legal work.

Applicants should send a letter of interest, resume, and writing sample to jobs@opportunityagenda.org. Include the job title “Robert L. Carter fellowship” in the subject line. No phone calls please.

Is your calendar looking empty? Add these informative events to your schedule!

2/20: City Council Hearing on Tenant Relocation

Want to learn more about rising rents? Want to learn more about city government? Attend a Seattle City Council Meeting on Tenant Relocation.

Many of you have been hearing about the epidemic of displacement in Seattle through our emails, the news, or your friends. Or perhaps you have experienced displacement yourself. From the Lockhaven to the Theodora to buildings in Columbia City, the Tenants Union has been supporting tenants who resist development and displacement. We will continue to support tenants in their building fights, but we also need to organize for legislative change to slow the system down.

Please join us at our first mobilization and teach-in for the campaign. The event will take place on Friday, February 20th  at 2:00 PM at the City Hall Council Chambers 600 4th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104.

2/22: Urban Poverty Forum (The New Debt)

This annual event sustains a local dialogue among diverse community voices around the systemic issues of urban poverty. This year’s program addresses debt–in particular, how debt impacts poor people (particularly people of color) in the Pacific Northwest. Speakers include Eddie Rye, host of the Urban Forum Northwest on 1150 AM Radio; Pamela Banks, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Urban League; Jonathan Grant, Executive Director of the Tenants Union; and tenants themselves, telling their own stories. The program also features a dramatic performance by The Mahogany Project. Learn from faith-based organizations, local nonprofits, and other concerned citizens about their efforts to help local citizens survive what’s been characterized as a “national epidemic” of consumer debt.

2/24: Social Justice Tuesday – “How to write a successful public interest grant application”

SJTPlease join us in Room 127 at 12:30 PM to learn more about the grant application process. Topics of discussion and questions answered: What to expect on a grant application? Where to find grant applications? Working with your organization/internship to prepare a grant application? Tips for writing applications?

 Please join:

  • Aline Carton-Listfjeld (Director Center for Public Service Law)
  • Tamara Gaffney-Curtin Fellowship  (PILA Grantee)
  • Anna Rae Goethe (Joan Fitzpatrick Fellowship)
  • Chris Pierce-Wright (PILA Grantee)
  • Emily Elijah (CHRJ/PILA Grantee)

2/26 & 3/31: Equal Justice Work Live Loan Repayment Webinars

Understanding loan repayment and public service loan forgiveness are key to a public service legal career. Equal Justice Works is offering free, live webinars on 2/26 and 3/31 to help. Sign up for a live webinar that works for your schedule – (2/26 3pm ET) http://ow.ly/JhPjo or (3/31 6pm ET) http://ow.ly/JhPug. Register even if you cannot attend. You will be sent a link to the recording of the webinar.

2/26: Diversity & Justice Fair (3:00 PM – 5:00 PM)

Featured Speaker: BERNARD KLEINA, Photographer & Civil Rights Activist

Join us for an open discussion on Diversity and Justice issues in our community! Celebrate the unveiling of the MLK Jr. photographs in­stalled at the UW School of Law & hear from the photographer, Ber­nard Kleina. Mr. Kleina is a founding member of the National Fair Housing Alliance and past President of the Chicago Area Fair Housing Alliance. Join us in welcoming Mr. Kleina and hear about his experi­ence documenting the historic civil rights movement through his photography.

First floor Galleria, UW School of Law, William H. Gates Hall, 4293 Memorial Way

2/27: 2015 Supreme Court Forum and Networking Reception

The Washington State Access to Justice Board will host a Supreme Court Forum and Networking Reception immediately following the Annual Goldmark Award Luncheon, a statewide convening of attorneys, judges, and students. During the Forum, Justices will participate in interactive discussions on topics pertinent to civil legal aid and access to justice, including leadership, race equity and the role of the justice system, and alternative structures for providing access to justice. The forum will conclude with a reception where individuals can continue the conversation and learn more about the exciting work of the Access to Justice Board.

 Forum & reception: To register for the forum and the reception, please email Ann Spangler, [spangler@uw.edu]spangler@uw.edu, by February 24, and indicate which programs (Forum from 2:00pm – 3:30pm and/or Reception from 3:30pm – 5:00pm) you plan on attending.

 3/4: What is social justice philanthropy?

Why does it mattter? How can YOU get involved? Join us on March 4 from 12:30 PM -2:00 PM at the Ethnic Cultural Center, Chicano Room to hear from our panelists about their experiences with social justice philanthropy. Panelists will include: Tammy Nguyen (Got Green), Christine Angtuaco (Evans School MPA Candidate), and Professor David Suarez (Evans School of Public Affairs). the vent will be moderated by our own Laurie Carlsson.

3/5-3/6: 8th Annual Feminist Legal Theory Conference

Hosted by the Center for Applied Feminism at the University of Baltimore School of Law, this two-day conference will highlight important issues in women’s rights and analyze how the Feminist Legal Theory lens can be applied in legal analysis. The event will take place at University of Baltimore School of Law (John and Frances Angelos Law Center) and will feature keynote speaker Chai Feldbaum (EEOC Commissioner).

The key to happiness is in this post (among other things)…

When Discretion Means Denial: A National Perspective on Criminal Records Barriers to Federally Subsidized Housing

Although the Department of Housing and Urban Development has given wide discretion to public housing authorities and federally subsidized project owners to admit low-income tenants with criminal records, many continue to deny housing to these individuals. Overly restrictive policies against people with criminal records can violate civil rights laws, increase homelessness, and otherwise impede a person’s chance to reintegrate into society.

A new report from the Shriver Center, When Discretion Means Denial: A National Perspective on Criminal Records Barriers to Federally Subsidized Housing, urges the Department of Housing and Urban Development to take active steps to eliminate barriers to housing for persons who have had contact with the criminal justice system.

Based on a review of over 300 written admissions policies from across the country, the report finds that the wide discretion given housing providers has resulted in broad screening criteria that deny individuals admission to housing for mere arrests and decades-old convictions, among other problems. The report identifies four areas where criminal records policies tend to be overly restrictive.

Learn more and download the report.

How laws around the world do and do not protect women from violence by David L. Richards & Jillienne Haglund

This article and accompanying photo is from The Washington Post’s Monkey Cage blog. 

In 1999, Jessica Lenahan-Gonzales’s estranged husband took her three girls in violation of a permanent restraining order requiring him to remain at least 100 yards from her and her children. The police of Castle Rock, Colo., failed to enforce the restraining order — after multiple requests — and the three girls were murdered by the estranged husband. A legal case against the police force reached the Supreme Court and, in a 7-to-2 decision, the court ruled that Castle Rock and its police could not be sued for failing to enforce a restraining order. In 2011, the case reached the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR), which found that the United States failed both to protect Lenahan and her daughters from domestic violence and to provide equal protection before the law. Further, said the IACHR, “all States have a legal obligation to protect women from domestic violence,” and this is “a problem widely recognized by the international community as a serious human rights violation and an extreme form of discrimination.”

Violence against women (VAW) is a pandemic, by any measure, and the repeated failures on the part of nations to provide meaningful recourse for victims of entrenched gender violence has led to growing calls by national and transnational actors alike for the adoption of stronger gender-violence legislation in all countries. Consequently, several important questions arise regarding the adoption and strength of domestic gender-violence laws, including:

[Continue reading here]

10th Annual Human Rights Institute – Human Rights Project at the Urban Justice Center (Co-sponsored by the US Human Rights Network)

May 7-9, 2015 | New York City

The Human Rights Project at the Urban Justice Center, in partnership with the US Human Rights Network, is pleased to announce that applications for its 10th annual Human Rights Institute (HRI) are currently available. The institute is a three-day professional development opportunity that promotes good governance and social change. It trains a select group of participants to strengthen their local efforts by using a human rights frame. Alumni become part of a nationwide community of advocates and have access to ongoing education, technical support and dialogue.

 Apply TodayScholarships are available to applicants with demonstrable need.

  • Scholarship Application Deadline – February 23, 2015
  • Regular Application Deadline – February 27, 2015

7 Essential Habits of Happier People (How Many Do You Possess?) by Jeff Haden

Happiness: everyone wants it, yet relatively few seem to get enough of it, especially those in their early forties. (That’s about the time many of us start thinking, “Is this all there is?”)

Maybe that’s because approximately 50% of your “happiness set-point” is determined by personality traits that are largely hereditary. In short, half of how happy you feel is basically outside your control. (Bummer.)

But that also means 50% of your level of happiness is totally within your control: relationships, health, career, etc. So even if you’re genetically disposed to be somewhat gloomy, you can still do things to make yourself a lot happier.

Like these:

1. Make good friends.

It’s easy to focus on building a professional network of partners, customers, employees, connections, etc, because there is (hopefully) a payoff.

But there’s a definite payoff to making real (not just professional or social media) friends. Increasing your number of friends correlates to higher subjective wellbeing. In terms of how happy you feel, doubling your number of friends is like increasing your income by 50%.

And if that’s not enough, people who don’t have strong social relationships are 50% less likely to survive at any given time than those who do. (That’s a scary thought for relative loners like me.)

Make friends outside of work. Make friends at work. Make friends everywhere.

But above all, make real friends. You’ll live a happier and longer life.

[Continue reading here]

Inmates re-entering society should not face lifetime barriers to work by Dan Satterberg & Brady Walkinshaw

Originally appeared as an “Opinion” piece in The Seattle Times

MORE than 7,000 people will finish their prison sentences and return to the community this year in Washington state. On the day of their release, each inmate is highly motivated never to return to prison, but more than half will be arrested within their first year back in the community. Why?

One reason is the hidden barriers that limit successful re-entry into our society. Former inmates don’t have access to many educational and job opportunities and are prohibited from applying for professional licenses that could lead to stable incomes.

Most of us are familiar with the direct consequences of committing a crime — jail or prison time, fines, community service, probation and treatment, but it’s the lesser-known indirect consequences that play a large part in why former inmates return to prison. These are known as “collateral consequences” because they have been imposed, not by judges or the criminal law, but by legislative bodies as additional hidden punishments.

While the terms of the sentence are measured in months or years, collateral consequences can last a lifetime. Is it fair to impose lifetime disabilities long after the debt has been paid to society? We don’t think so.

[Continue reading here]

STUDY BREAK: Browse these new jobs while you have the day off

Due 2/17: Strategic Advisor for Housing Policy

The Office of Housing works to build strong healthy communities and increase opportunities for people of all income levels to live in our city.

As a senior member on the Office of Housing’s Policy and Equitable Development team, you will be responsible for crafting innovative policies to foster housing affordability. You will oversee place-based initiatives, pursue site-specific opportunities and develop programs to produce and preserve affordability within the private housing market. You will perform data analysis and lead research initiatives and communicate findings to broad audiences.  Acting as both a technical expert and a big picture strategist, you will work with community members, housing developers, senior management and policy makers to promote housing affordability and equitable development patterns throughout Seattle.

If you have questions please contact Yoshiko Matsui (Yoshiko.matusi@seattle.gov)

Due 2/27: Want a Judicial Internship/Externship in Los Angeles this Summer? Los Angeles Superior Court Seeks 1L & 2Ls. 

The Superior Court of California, County of Los Angeles is currently accepting applications for summer 2015. Externs for the Superior Court generally work directly with the Superior Court’s judicial officers. Externsare often given the opportunity to research and write legal memoranda on pending law and motion matters, to observe trials and daily law and motion calendars, and to complete special projects.Externships are available in civil, criminal, family, and juvenile courtrooms. Part­time and full­time positions are available.

Interested students should submit a resume, transcript (if available) and writing sample via email. In the text of the email, please indicate your preferred area of law. All materials should be submitted as soon as possible. Positions will be filled on an on­going basis. Materials are accepted via email only and can be sent to: extern@lacourt.org. Please email any questions to extern@lacourt.org.

Students should submit a cover letter, resume, transcript (if available), and short writing sample by February 27th, 2015 to Charisse Brimmer, Supervising Research Attorney, at extern@lacourt.org

Interest in Policy Work? Senator Patty Murray Seeks Student Interns in DC

Senator Patty Murray, ranking member of the U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Minority Oversight & Investigations Office is seeking unpaid Law Clerks for Summer 2015.

The position offers law students or recent graduates the opportunity to gain substantive experience while participating in the legislative process. Law Clerks will assist Committee staff in conducting document review, policy and legal research, drafting memoranda, contributing to reports and preparing for hearings. Qualifications: Applicants must be current law students or recent graduates. Applicants must also demonstrate outstanding research abilities, work well in a fast-paced environment and possess excellent written and oral communication skills. Previous experience in government is not required, but candidates should have a general understanding of the legislative process. Applicants available full-time throughout the summer are preferred, though candidates available part-time may also be considered.

To learn more about the committee’s work please visit here: http://www.help.senate.gov/newsroom/press/release/?id=0496b1ed-ab8f-4db2-bfc6-8109a2cc1a65&groups=Chair

Applications: Interested applicants should apply for this position by emailing a cover letter, resume, writing sample and availability to HELPOversightClerk@gmail.com as soon as possible. Applications will be accepted until the positions have been filled. The office is an equal opportunity employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, gender identity or sexual orientation.

Attorney General’s Office is seeking AGO Senior Investigator/Analyst, Civil Rights Unit

The Attorney General’s Office is recruiting for a full time permanent AGO Senior Investigator/Analyst in our Civil Rights Unit. This position is located in downtown Seattle. The incumbent in this position will be required to fluently read, write, and speak in English and Spanish languages and have the ability to effectively, efficiently and accurately translate from English to Spanish and Spanish to English.

The Civil Rights Unit investigates and litigates violations of the laws of Washington State that may include discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sexual orientation, religion, disability, and veteran status. The Civil Rights Unit will work closely with the Consumer Protection Division and the Criminal Justice Division of the AG’s Office, as well as with the Washington Human Rights Commission and federal agencies.

Paid Fellowship ($5500) Available for Yakima position through Laurel Rubin Farmworker Justice Project.  

The Northwest Justice Project Farmworker Unit seeks summer interns to assist experienced attorneys in serving migrant farm workers through farm labor camp outreach, community education and legal work. Law student outreach is an essential component in helping workers in their efforts to enforce their labor rights and obtain access to needed services.

Law students will work with attorneys on ongoing cases and projects.  Northwest Justice Project is the LSC funded staffed Legal Services program for Washington State.  The position in Yakima is focused full –time on farmworker advocacy.  A position in the Wenatchee office will combine farmworker outreach with general legal services legal advocacy.   Positions may become available in other NJP offices.

Email cover letter, resume and & writing sample to: Attn.: Karen Holland, Director of Human Resources; Northwest Justice Project; karenh@nwjustice.org

The Center for WorkLife is seeking summer interns for PAID position

The Center for WorkLife Law (WLL) is a nonprofit research and advocacy group housed at the University of California, Hastings College of the Law.  WLL seeks to jump-start the stalled gender revolution by producing concrete social and institutional change. Our current initiatives include an innovative working group on pregnancy accommodation, research on how gender bias differs by race, a path-breaking study on predictable scheduling of hourly workers, and programs and best practices for advancing women leaders. WLL is also a leader in the field of Family Responsibilities Discrimination (FRD), a form of employment discrimination against workers based on their family caregiving responsibilities.

 Summer interns are involved in all facets of the Center’s work, including participating in strategy sessions, researching law and policy, contributing to articles and reports, and attending the Center’s special events. Summer interns typically produce a significant piece of written work over the course of the summer, usually in the form of a legal research memo.

Summer interns receive a $5,000 stipend for ten weeks of full-time work.

For more information about the Center, please visit www.worklife.org.

Hiring Criteria: Open to rising second- and third-year law students; excellent research, writing, analytical, and communication skills required; and an internship with WLL is particularly well-suited for students with an interest in employment law and women’s advancement.

 To Apply: Please send a cover letter, a resume, a list of three references, and a writing sample to Sanaz Rizlenjani at rizlenjanis@uchastings.edu.

Due Feb. 20: NJP seeks Pro Bono Innovation Fund Project Attorney

Under the overall supervision of NJP’s Director of Strategic Initiatives, the PBIF Project Attorney will carry out the activities described in the grant proposal to increase the level of “extended service” provided by volunteer attorneys in partner volunteer lawyer programs.

All NJP attorneys are expected to bring the maturity and commitment to their work necessary to participate as members of a comprehensive, statewide equal justice delivery system.

Duties:

  • Work collaboratively with project partners and NJP staff to identify substantive law areas of focus and to produce “toolkits” including written and other resources to support pro bono attorneys in undertaking matters in the focus areas
  • Mentor pro bono attorneys who are participating in the project
  • Train private attorneys on how to mentor other attorneys as well as on substantive law as needed
  • Keep supervisors apprised of project progress and provide information needed for reporting to LSC and other funders

The position will be based in Bellingham and service responsibilities will be in both Northwest and Eastern Washington locations.  Travel to project partner and NJP Seattle locations and other sites as needed. Must be able to work occasionally in the evening as needed to meet the needs of partner volunteer lawyer programs.

Email Cover letter, resume and writing sample to Karen Holland, karenh@nwjustice.org no later than February 20, 2015.

Due March 1: National Women’s Law Center is seeking a new VP!

The Vice President for Health and Reproductive Rights (HRR) is responsible for identifying, planning and implementing NWLC’s programmatic and advocacy initiatives pertaining to women’s health and reproductive rights.  S/he will advocate before legislatures and Congress, courts and administrative agencies, work with varied coalitions at state/national level, conduct research and identify and provide necessary information to the public about HRR issues.  S/he will lead a talented team and manage a multi-million dollar departmental budget; work in close partnership with the Development Team to identify, cultivate, solicit, and steward donors who support the HRR program; and serve as a key member of NWLC’s senior leadership team. S/he will report directly to the Co-Presidents.

 Ideal qualifications include: Demonstrated track record of accomplishment in leading health and reproductive rights initiatives, developing innovative programs, and translating strategy into targeted goals and actions; expertise on Medicaid and the Affordable Care Act, and on legislative and administrative advocacy; significant experience in cultivating donors and maintaining on-going relations with program funders; strong management skills and the ability to recruit, motivate and supervise a team of professionals using a collaborative, team-driven style; strong organizational, analytical, and time-management  skills and ability to manage multiple and shifting priorities; superior writing and public presentation skills; impeccable judgment and integrity;  commitment to social and economic justice, and passion for NWLC’s mission.  Law degree and 10 years or more experience required.

 Compensation will be competitive and commensurate with experience and accomplishments. Applications will be considered in confidence by Conway Strategic and NWLC. To apply, please email a cover letter and resume by March 1, 2015 to Search@ConwayStrategic.com.  Kindly direct all inquiries to Search@ConwayStrategic.com; do not contact NWLC.   

Due March 31: INVITATION FOR APPLICATIONS FOR FOREIGN LAW CLERKS

The Justices of the Constitutional Court of South Africa are pleased to invite applications from outstanding recent law graduates and young lawyers interested in serving as foreign law clerks. Candidates may be appointed to start as soon as 1 April 2015.

Each year, 15 to 20 young lawyers from around the world serve as foreign law clerks to the Constitutional Court. Working alongside two South African law clerks, foreign law clerks assist a specific judge in performing his or her duties. The responsibilities of foreign law clerks are essentially the same as those of their South African counterparts and similar to judicial clerks elsewhere in the common law world. These include extensive legal research and writing, as well as the formulation, drafting, and editing of judgments. The Court itself is highly collaborative, allowing for substantial engagement among clerks from all chambers.

Substantial knowledge of South African law is not a prerequisite, but familiarity with South Africa’s history and contemporary affairs is highly valued.

Applications must include the following: (1) a cover letter describing the applicant’s interest in the Court’s work that must specify a proposed start date (or range of start dates) for which he or she would like to be considered; (2) a full curriculum vitae; (3) copies of all post- secondary academic records (unofficial transcripts are permitted); (4) a legal writing sample of approximately 6-12 pages; and (5) at least two reference letters (at least one academic and one professional). Please note that applicants may either have references send the letters directly to the Court or applicants may compile the letters and send a complete application to the Court themselves.

Fill your heart with these public service opportunities this Valentine’s day

2/17: Social Justice Tuesday – “Caught in the Middle: Accessing legal service when you aren’t low income enough”

SJTJoin us in Room 127 at 12:30pm for this presentation about legal services that are available to people of “moderate means.” People who are very low income may be eligible for free legal aid. But for people just above those free legal aid eligibility guidelines, the options are practically nonexistent and yet these people who do not have sufficient income to pay market rates for a lawyer. Come hear from lawyers and students who have a found a way to bridge this justice gap.

 Panelists include: Celeste Miller (WSBA low bono section), Vincent Humphries (Moderate Means Program), and Lauren Matzelle (Bridging the Gap – student intern). If you would like lunch please RSVP via Symplicity or gatespsl@uw.edu RSVP by 12:00 pm Monday, February 16, 2015.

2/19: The Joint Legislative Audit and Review Committee (JLARC) Information Session

Please join us to learn more about the Joint Legislative Audit and ReviewCommittee (JLARC) in Room 118 at 12:30PM.  JLARC is a bipartisan and bicameral committee of the Washington State Legislature.  Nonpartisan JLARC staff evaluate the performance of state agencies and programs to make government more effective, efficient, and accountable.  One of JLARC’s long-term assignments is to review Washington’s tax preferences (e.g., exemptions, deductions, and credits).

 JLARC is seeking a qualified legal intern or extern for the summer of 2013 to perform legal research for the tax preference reviews, under the supervision of JLARC’s research attorneys and analysts.

 The intern will have an opportunity to: Gain in-depth knowledge of Washington State tax laws, policies, and history; assist the Citizen Commission for Performance Review of Tax Preferences; and make valuable professional contacts in state government.

Please RSVP via Symplicity or gatespsl@uw.edu

 2/19 – Deadline: Funding for UW Law Students is Available for: Citizen University National Conference!

Let’s rekindle citizenship in America! March 20 & 21, 2015. The events Friday, March 20 at 6:30pm will take place at Fisher Pavilion – Seattle Center.

This annual national conference is like no other civic gathering in America. Hundreds of change-makers, activists, and catalysts show up to learn about power, build their networks, and recharge their sense of purpose. They come from across the country, the political spectrum, and a wide range of domains — from immigrant rights to national service, voting reform to veteran re-integration, civic education to Hollywood and tech. They are you.

This is a time when citizens are solving problems in new ways, bypassing broken institutions, stale ideologies, and polarized politics. We are part of a movement to rekindle citizenship in America. We hope you’ll join us

Bring a water bottle, wear comfortable clothing and shoes, and learn how to practice powerful citizenship! http://www.citizenuniversity.us/conference/If you wish to attend send your request and resume to mestorms@uw.edu by February 19, 11:59 pm.

2/25: Immigration 101 – Training for Social Service Providers

This training is designed especially for individuals who work with and serve the immigrant community and who want to learn more about the immigration system, immigration enforcement, and how immigration issues affect the community! 

Topics to be addressed include: an overview of our immigration system and immigration status, how does the President’s new actions on immigration affect the community?, what barriers prevent immigrants from accessing services?, what happens when people are detained by immigration authorities?, what protections are available to immigrant victims of crime and survivors of domestic violence?, what protections are available for immigrant youth?, what resources are available in the community to help?, and more!

Note: This training is NOT intended for attorneys and CLE credit is not available.  The training is intended for social service providers in non-legal fields who want general information and resources to refer community members to qualified legal service providers. Join us on February 25 from 1:00-5:00 PM at New Holly Gathering Hall (7054 32nd Ave S., Seattle, WA, 98118).

A registration fee ($25) is required for this training, but scholarships are available (see the Register Now link for more details). We hope to see you there!  

De-stress this hump day with fellowships, volunteer opportunities, and some reading material

Due 2/13: Michael Maggio Immigrants’ Rights Summer Fellowship 

Since its inception in 2009, the Michael Maggio Immigrants’ Rights Summer Fellowship Program has awarded a dedicated law school student each summer the opportunity to engage in a self-initiated project that strengthens their commitment for advocacy and promotes justice and equality for vulnerable immigrant groups. The Fellowship was established by the Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law (CHRCL), the National Immigration Project of the National Lawyers Guild (NIP/NLG), and the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) to commemorate the life and legal contributions of Michael Maggio and to continue his pursuit for equality and peace. The Fellowship is a wonderful opportunity for any law school student who is driven to raise awareness and fight for the underserved immigrant community.

  The Fellowship awards $2,500 to a law student to work on an immigration related student-initiated project. Applicants must submit a project proposal with an organization willing to host the student for 10 weeks during the summer. The student’s proposal must include a collaborative plan with the host organization to partially match the Fellowship award in the amount of $1,500. This matching may be done by either direct stipend by the host organization or through other means, e.g., law school public interest funding, independent fundraising, etc. This ensures that the student will receive a total funding in the amount of $4,000.

 To learn more about the Fellowship and to download the application form, select here. Also, please visit www.maggiofellowship.org to learn more about Michael Maggio, and to download the application and instructions in Microsoft Word format.

 If you have specific questions about the fellowship program, please contact Marchela Iahdjian, Staff Attorney at marchela@centerforhumanrights.org and Peter Schey, President of the Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law at pschey@centerforhumanrights.org. 

Just What Does it Mean to Lead with your Best Self? by Dan Mulhern

February 9, 2015, Everyday Leadership

Dan MulhernI have been signing-off Reading for Leading for 15 years with the line “lead with your best self.” What do I mean by that? And, more importantly, what do you take from it?

Here is perhaps the acid test of leading with your best self. A story. I moved back to Detroit when I was 28. Ten years earlier, I had left for college, then run a neighborhood center in New Orleans, gone to law school, and returned, impassioned to make a difference in my home city. I really thought I knew a lot, and I wanted to challenge the way things were running which, at the same, seemed abysmal. I got a great job in county government, got active in school board politics, and was reaching out to find out how I could contribute. Somebody told me I should meet with Detroit’s director of parks and recreation; he was a minister, a great guy, I was told. And he agreed to have lunch with me.

I remember that I was confrontative. I wondered, perhaps rudely, how he could deal with the city’s seeming complacency, as more people moved out, racial animosities continued to divide us, schools were being closed, and crime was the only consistent thing going. He din’t take the bait, never got defensive. All he did was encourage me! All he did was ask me my thoughts and opinions. All he did was calmly explain what he and others were trying to accomplish and ask what I thought and how I could help. His kindness disarmed me. His intellectual curiosity kept me from maintaining my judgmental attitude and arrogance. That was in 1988.

I was lucky enough to have my life thread in and around Dan Krichbaum’s for the next 26 years. I am still terribly shook that he was hit by two strokes — and died last week. I honestly can’t imagine Detroit and Michigan and the world without him. Continue reading here.

Help by volunteering at El Centro de la Raza with LBAW’s Legal Clinic

LBAWLBAW is in great need of volunteers (attorneys, law students, translators) for this month’s Legal Clinic on Wednesday, February 11th.  We expect that many people will show up for consultations and we need your help! PLEASE consider volunteering this month and throughout 2015.  The Clinic takes place the 2nd Wednesday of each month at El Centro.

Don’t speak Spanish??  No sweat!  We will provide you with a translator. Just complete the Volunteer Application.  Attorneys needed in the following practice areas:

  • Family Law *especially high need in this area*
  • Immigration
  • Criminal Law *especially high need in this area*
  • Personal Injury
  • Employment Law
  • Property/Landlord Tenant *especially high need in this area*

Law Students and translators needed for intakes and translation.  If you would like to help in another way, please let us know.

Due: 3/16 –2015-2017 Jerry Shestack Justice Fellowship

The Jerry Shestack Justice Fellowship is a two-year litigation-focused fellowship that will be selected on a bi-annual basis by the Lawyers’ Committee in consultation with the Shestack Justice Advisory Committee. Jerry Shestack was an extraordinary lawyer and a driving force in advancing the cause of civil and human rights. One of his greatest legacies was his central role in the founding of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law in 1963.

 Law school graduates who have passed the bar and have 2 to 3 years of outstanding litigation experience and/or judicial clerkships are eligible. The chosen Fellow will have demonstrated a passion and commitment to civil rights issues and public service and have shown promise of becoming an exceptional litigator. Fellows are paid at the same salary of Lawyers’ Committee attorneys with the same number of years of experience.

How to Apply:  Applications are due on March 16, 2015. We expect to announce the successful applicant in June. The Shestack Fellow will begin working at the Lawyers’ Committee in fall 2015. Please apply at https://podio.com/webforms/10775370/768081. Applications must include the following materials:

  • Resume
  • Law school transcript
  • Two page letter of intent
  • Two letters of recommendation
  • Writing sample

This oppressed, unjust (U.S.) American life by Shafaq Hasan

From Nonprofit Quarterly and National Public Radio, WUWM (Milwaukee, WI) 

Increasingly, some outlets are using longer-form journalism to bring their readers or listeners more deeply into an issue. This American Life is one of those outlets, despite the recent kerfuffle about its journalistic chops.

As outgoing Attorney General Eric Holder spends his last few weeks in office speaking to civilians about community relations with their local police departments, the issue is also taking center stage in a new podcast series by This American Life, a weekly radio program recently popularized by the true crime podcast, Serial.

Narrated by Brian Reed, the new two-part series, “Cops See It Differently,” was launched online last Friday and delves into the contentious relations between police departments and their communities, particularly minority communities. It’s an issue that erupted into public discourse last year following the deaths of Eric Garner and Michael Brown, leading to the Black Lives Matter movement.

This first part of the series focuses on the police department in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and ardent, good-intentioned police chief Ed Flynn in particular. By the time he came into the position back in 2008, there were already deep-seated tensions underlying community and police relations in Milwaukee, a city with a great racial divide.

The episode takes listeners through some of the Milwaukee department’s more controversial policing moments, such as the death of 22-year-old Derrick Williams, who died in the back of a squad car after telling officers, “I can’t breathe.” (That’s right; Milwaukee had its own Eric Garner three years before the Staten Island case.) The episode also looks into the aftermath of the police shooting death of mentally ill Dontre Hamilton, which resulted in the firing of the officer and a heated town hall meeting that was frustrating for both the community and police department.

But it’s the prologue of the series that provides the most succinct depiction of how many minorities feel about local police officers. Back in September, Lisa Mahone of Hammond, Indiana, her two children, and her friend Jamal Jones were pulled over for a routine traffic stop that escalated to police officers pulling their guns and demanding Mahone step out of the car. Fearing for her life, Mahone called 911—on the police officers. Continue reading here.

This Valentine’s Week, treat yourself to some new amazing public service experiences

Apply Today for the Washington Bus Fellowship to learn about grassroots organization!

If you or a young person in your life (18-25) is looking for a transformative experience this summer, check out the Washington Bus’s Fellowship–a ten-week paid political, social justice, and community building program where young folks learn practical grassroots organizing skills and put them to work influencing progressive change in Seattle! Fellows will participate in hands-on activities and work with progressive leaders from across the state. The application can be found here.

Summer 2015 International Human Rights Law Internship 

Americans for Democracy and Human Rights in Bahrain (ADHRB) is a seeking a creative, organized, passionate, and hard-working legal intern for its Washington, DC office for the summer. Interns will: prepare client complaints for documentation with the Special Procedures of the United Nations; identify and research pertinent domestic and international law; prepare research memoranda on United Nations systems; assist with client interviews as necessary; assist the advocacy team as necessary; and assist with administrative duties as required.

Please email a resume, cover letter, excerpted legal brief (10 pages max.) to internships [at] adhrb.org with the subject lineLEGAL EXTERN APPLICATION. We would additionally welcome any papers that a student has written analyzing international human rights law.

Nez Perce Tribe’s Office of Legal Counsel seeks Staff Attorney

The Nez Perce Tribe’s Office of Legal Counsel offers an active and dynamic opportunity to assist the Tribe in protecting and advancing in sovereignty and treaty rights. The Office is seeking a staff attorney at its office in Lapwai, Idaho to join its team. The new hire is expected to immediately assume responsibility for handling a substantial work load, primarily involving natural resource issues related to the protection and advancement of tribal sovereignty and treaty-reserved rights. The work load includes handling an active litigation docket and providing legal counsel on a broad variety of issues associated with the Tribe’s interests. The new staff attorney will also be responsible for tasks delegated by the Managing Attorney. A complete application includes: resume, writing sample, and three letters of reference to – Lee Bourgeau, Director, Human Resources, RE: Staff Attorney, No., HR 15-108, P.O. Box 365, Lapwai, Idaho, 83540 by 4:30 PM on February 27. For more information contact the Managing Attorney, Julie S. Kane at juliek@nezperce.org

Due 2/15: Entry Level Attorney position at Department of Homeland Security

Do you desire to be a part of the vibrant United States immigrant admission process, to protect American interests, and to secure our Nation while building a meaningful and rewarding career? If so, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), and its Office of the Chief Counsel (OCC) are calling.

As part of both USCIS and the DHS Office of the General Counsel, you will work with other highly talented attorneys and colleagues on a rich array of intellectually challenging, critically important, cutting edge legal issues. DHS components work collectively, and USCIS strives, to enforce and administer immigration laws fairly, efficiently, and in keeping with the law, at the same time that we seek to prevent terrorism, secure borders, safeguard cyberspace and ensure resilience to disasters. The vitality and magnitude of this mission are achieved by a diverse workforce spanning hundreds of occupations. Make an impact; join OCC, USCIS, and DHS!

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Office of the Chief Counsel, Department of Homeland Security (DHS), is seeking recent law schools graduates since January 1, 2012 with more than 1 year of post-JD experience for an entry level attorney position in New York, NY as an Associate Counsel with the Northeastern Law Division (NELD).  The position is supervised by a NELD Deputy Chief and the NELD Chief.

Due 2/18: Become the Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) Specialist in King County

 incumbent is responsible for supporting volunteers who are Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) in child abuse and neglect cases. Will supervise CASA volunteers, conduct case management, train, and provide support in court. Primary emphasis is placed on volunteer supervision. This is a paid, full-time position in King County Superior Court. To apply, click here.

Due 2/27: Become a Global Advocacy Adviser for the Center of Reproductive Rights

Founded in 1992, the Center for Reproductive Rights (the Center) is a non-profit organization that promotes women’s equality worldwide by securing reproductive rights in constitutional and international human rights law. Its mission is straightforward and ambitious: to advance reproductive health and rights as fundamental rights that all governments are legally obligated to protect, respect and fulfill. The Center is unmatched as a reproductive rights organization in its expertise in U.S. constitutional law, comparative law, and international human rights law.

The Center’s Global Legal Program has brought groundbreaking cases before national courts, U.N. committees, and regional human rights bodies, and has built the legal capacity of women’s rights advocates in over 50 countries.  The Global Advocacy Adviser will be joining the Center at a critical time for reproductive rights globally. To learn more about the Center for Reproductive Rights, go to www.reproductiverights.org. The Center seeks a Global Advocacy Adviser who will support the work of the Global Advocacy team in the Global Legal Program, and will report to the Director of Global Advocacy.

Please click on this link to apply.  A cover letter, résumé, writing sample in English (unedited and preferably relevant to international human rights advocacy) and contact information for three references must be included in your application in order to be considered for this position.  Please include these application materials as attachments.