On this MLK day look through new social justice and public interest positions!

HIRING: For spring and summer 2015 – Disability Rights CA is seeking law clerk (rolling deadline)

Disability Rights California (DRC) is a nonprofit public interest law firm which is federally mandated to protect the legal, civil and service rights of persons with disabilities. Established in 1978, DRC served persons with developmental disabilities, such as intellectual disabilities, autism and other severe disabilities. In 1986, DRC expanded its services topersons with psychiatric disabilities. DRC now serves all Californians with disabilities—physical, psychiatric,and developmental.

Law clerks will carry a diverse workload that will help develop traditional legal skills as well as skills beneficial to working with clientele in a legal services environment. Law clerks will also gainsubstantive knowledge regarding the systems and laws that affect the lives of individuals with disabilities.

Law clerks at DRC will have the opportunity to:

  • Interview clients and consumers
  • Provide information on self-advocacy
  • Conduct legal research and produce legal writing
  • Represent clients in mediations and at administrative hearing
  • Provide assistance to people with disabilities who areincarcerated to ensure the enforcement of their legal rights
  • Assist clients in filing disability-based complaints with appropriate state and federal agencies
  • Investigate serious and systemic abuse and neglect instate and private facilities serving people with disabilities
  • Conduct trainings on disability law.

Although some DRC positions are available, preference is given to work-study and volunteer students. Attorneys at DRC are willing to assist students develop grant proposals and fellowship applications.

 

Jan. 21, 2015: U.S. Dept. of Justice – Federal Bureau of Prisons

This attorney will have the opportunity to work with Central Office, regional and institution management and line staff with respect to litigation affecting the Bureau of Prisons, as well as attorneys in the Solicitors General’s Office and other attorneys in the Department of Justice (DOJ) and in the U. S. Attorney’s Offices. The incumbent’s responsibilities include: analyzing adverse decisions against the BOP and drafting recommendations to DOJ for the Assistant Director/General Counsel’s signature, this includes cases before the Supreme Court; analyzing adverse decisions against other correctional agencies and developing a position for the Bureau on amicus participation by the United States in the Supreme Court; developing an expertise in the Prisoner Litigation Reform Act, Religious Freedom Restoration Act, and constitutional issues affecting Bureau litigation; providing training to Bureau and DOJ attorneys on issues affecting Bureau litigation; and participating in moot courts with assistant U.S. attorneys and DOJ attorneys.

The primary duties of the incumbent will be to respond to legal issues involving conditions of confinement arising out of specialized housing units, to include but not limited to, administrative remedy responses, requests for information under the Freedom of Information Act, replies to official correspondence, and manages litigation, to include discovery issues, affecting the Bureau of Prisons.

QUALIFICATIONS:

  • Applicant must possess a J.D. degree, be an active member of the bar (any jurisdiction), and have at least 1 year of post-J.D. experience
  • Preferred qualifications: Some litigation experience is desired.

 

Jan. 22, 2015: Assistant Attorneys General- Criminal Justice Division (Oregon)

The Oregon Department of Justice is seeking applications for an Assistant Attorney General to serve as a critical member of the Attorney General’s Criminal Justice Division. This position is based in Salem and will require periodic travel throughout the state.

The Criminal Justice Division is looking for an experienced prosecutor who is enthusiastic about working with federal, state and local law enforcement across the state to actively investigate and prosecute organized criminal enterprises, public corruption, internet crimes against children, and human trafficking.
Applicants will be expected to evaluate and pursue cases that will result in arrest and conviction. Applicants will also be expected to provide advice and support for District Attorneys and Deputy District Attorneys across the state, and to present at trainings. Additionally, applicants will be expected to prosecute conflict cases and specialty cases at the request of District Attorneys.
 
Experience prosecuting significant cases in a District Attorney’s office (or equivalent experience) is required. Experience prosecuting RICO cases and directing large-scale grand jury and criminal investigations is preferred, but not required.
This position will be filled at either the Assistant Attorney General or the Senior Assistant Attorney General level depending on experience and other factors. Questions regarding this position should be directed to Darin Tweedt, Chief Counsel of the Criminal Justice Division, at (503) 378-6347, (800) 735-1232 TTY.
QUALIFICATIONS:
  • All final candidates for employment must pass a thorough criminal background investigation.
  • Applicants must possess a certificate of admission to the Bar of the State of Oregon and be eligible to practice law before the courts of the State of Oregon at the time of appointment.
  • Experience prosecuting significant cases in a District Attorney’s office (or equivalent experience) is required. Experience prosecuting RICO cases and directing large-scale grand jury and criminal investigations is preferred, but not required.
  • Candidates from diverse backgrounds are encouraged to apply.  The Department of Justice is an equal opportunity employer, does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, religion, age or disability, and is committed to workplace diversity. The Department of Justice is an Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action Employer.

Jan. 29, 2015: Northwest Immigrant Rights Project seeks a new staff attorney

The Northwest Immigrant Rights Project (NWIRP) seeks a Spanish-speaking bilingual attorney to
provide direct representation, community outreach and education to survivors of domestic
violence and sexual assault and others who qualify for humanitarian protections. The staff attorney will provide legal assistance to community members through: (1) direct
representation (2) individual consultations; and (3) community education. The attorney will
focus on providing representation on cases involving U visa petitions, VAWA self-petitions,
adjustment of status applications and other forms of immigration relief. The attorney will also
provide representation in removal proceedings before the immigration court. The staff attorney
may also be assigned work relating to other immigration matters.

QUALIFICATIONS:

  • Law degree;
  • Admission to the bar of any state in the U.S., but will consider an applicant who has taken the bar exam and is awaiting results
  • Demonstrated commitment to immigrant rights and willingness to support NWIRP’s mission, vision and values;
  • Excellent written and oral communication skills;
  • Commitment to working in a diverse working environment;
  • Fluent in English and Spanish;
  • Prior experience working with survivors of domestic violence or sexual assault preferred;
  • Strong organizational skills and ability to work independently; and
  • Proficiency in use of web-based software, MS Word and MS Excel.

Feb. 1, 2015: New York Lawyers for Public Interest seeking staff attorney

New York Lawyers for the Public Interest (NYLPI), a nonprofit civil rights law firm committed to advancing equality and civil rights is seeking applicants for the position of Staff Attorney in
its Health Justice (HJ) Program to provide immigration representation and lead legal and policy
campaigns to increase health access for marginalized communities

QUALIFICATIONS

  • Must be an attorney in good standing.
  • Must either be licensed to practice law in the State of New York or be eligible for admission to the New York bar at the time of hiring (must be admitted within one year of hire).
  • A minimum of two years of experience with legal, policy and/or administrative advocacy.
  • A minimum of one year of experience representing clients in affirmative immigration applications and petitions such as asylum, I-130 and I-485 petitions, U- and TNonimmigrant status, and deferred action. Exceptional candidates with less experience will be considered.
  • Excellent strategic judgment and the drive to originate and effectuate challenging campaigns.
  • Experience working with coalitions of community members and community-based organizations.
  • Excellent writing, analytic and public speaking skills.

Feb. 6, 2015: Columbia Legal Services summer internship opportunities for law students!

Columbia Legal Services (CLS) is a statewide legal aid program in Washington State representing low-income people and vulnerable groups with critical civil legal needs. We represent clients in a wide variety of civil cases including class actions and legislative rule-making advocacy from five statewide offices: Seattle, Olympia, Wenatchee, Yakima and Kennewick. We offer several summer internship opportunities for law students. Summer Interns are expected to commit to full-time work for a minimum of 10 weeks. Most positions are for school credit, are paid under work-study, or are fellowship/public interest grant funded. The following positions are offered for 2015:

  • Basic Human Needs (Seattle) [Preference given to Seattle U and Gonzaga students]
  • Children & Youth Project (Seattle)
  • Institutions Project (Seattle)
  • Laurel Rubin Farmworker Justice Project (Olympia, Wenatchee, Yakima) [PAID position]
  • Working Families Project Foreclosure Work Group (Olympia) [Policy intern]
  • Working Families Project Foreclosure Work Group (Seattle)
  • Working Families Project Immigrant Workers Group (Seattle)

Feb. 13, 2015: 2015 Michael Maggio Immigrants’ Rights Summer Fellowship – CENTER FOR HUMAN RIGHTS AND CONSTITUTIONAL LAW

The primary mission of the Michael Maggio Immigrants’ Rights Fellowship is to strengthen law students’ long-term commitment to promote justice and equality for vulnerable immigrant groups.

The Fellowship will be awarded to one law student each summer to work on a student-initiated project. Students must submit a project proposal with an organization willing to host the student for 10 weeks and provide a $1,500 stipend (the Maggio Immigrants’ Rights Fellowship will provide a $2,500 stipend). The Fellow will be required to provide reports half way through and at the conclusion of the Fellowship, regarding his or her progress in meeting the goals of the project. The host organization must be willing to supervise and provide all logistical needs of the Fellow including office space and supplies. Host organization will also be asked to provide a brief report at the end of the Fellowship.

QUALIFICATIONS:

  • Law student (1L, 2L, or 3L) in good standing at any accredited law school program in the United States.
  • Demonstrated commitment to social justice and/or immigrants’ rights issues.

Mar. 1, 2015: Northwest Immigrants Rights Project – Intern for 1Ls, 2Ls, and 3Ls!

NWIRP’s Seattle Office services low-income immigrants and refugees in Western Washington. The office provides direct legal representation, referrals to pro bono attorneys, pro se assistance, and workshops on immigration matters ranging from asylum, citizenship, family petitions, and protections for immigrant children and victims of crimes.

Under the supervision of attorneys, interns will assist with case matters before the Immigration Court and the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). Depending on unit placement, interns’ responsibilities may include: Conducting legal research and drafting briefs in support of applications for relief; researching country conditions in support of claims for asylum; preparing and submitting filings with the Immigration Court and USCIS; and working directing with clients, such as conducting intakes and drafting client declarations in support of
applications for relief.

QUALIFICATIONS

  • The internship is open to first, second, and third year law students. Applicants should have excellent written and oral communication skills, an interest in immigration law, an ability to work in a diverse and fast-paced work environment, and a commitment to advancing and defending the legal rights of low-income immigrants and refugees.
  • Applicants proficient in Spanish are strongly preferred.
  • The internship is unpaid, but NWIRP will work with applicants to secure outside funding or academic credit.

 

National Center for Youth Law (NCYL) seeking juvenile justice attorney in their Oakland office (rolling deadline)

The National Center for Youth Law (NCYL) (www.youthlaw.org) is a non-profit organization that for more than four decades has used the law to ensure that low-income children have the resources, support, and opportunities they need for a fair start in life. NCYL’s primary areas of focus are child welfare, juvenile justice, and health/mental health.

NCYL seeks an attorney to lead projects aimed at improving the educational outcomes of probation-involved youth. The work will focus on serving youth who have been adjudicated delinquent and remain under the jurisdiction of the probation agency, but are not in a locked facility. The attorney will be supervised by NCYL attorneys with expertise in juvenile justice and foster youth education.

The attorney’s primary responsibilities will include, but are not limited to:

  • Adapting FosterEd’s model, strategies, program materials, and technology tools to meet the needs of probation-involved youth;
  • Partnering with state and local agency partners to implement programs serving probation-involved youth;
  • Developing measurable project objectives and detailed workplans; and
  • Ensuring implementation of program goals and outcomes.

This job will not involve providing direct legal representation to juveniles.

QUALIFICATIONS

  • Law degree
  • Ability to work with probation, child welfare, education, and judicial agencies, and with at-risk youth and their families; to manage complex projects; to pay close attention to details and manage multiple assignments; and to work in a fast-paced nonprofit environment
  • Excellent writing, speaking, and interpersonal skills
  • Demonstrated commitment to improving the lives of at-risk youth

Desired Qualifications:

  • An understanding of the education, child welfare, probation, and juvenile court systems
  • Significant experience working with the juvenile probation system and/or the juvenile court system
  • Experience forming and participating in cross-system collaborative teams; working directly with at-risk children and youth; and working with data