New Summer Funding, Writing Competition, Attend Citizen University & Board Service News- Just for You!

UW Law & Latina/o Bar Association Announce New Public Interest Summer Grant, Deadline 4/3

UW LBAW Summer Grant

The Latina/o Bar Association of Washington and the University of Washington School of Law Public Interest Summer Grant provides $5000 for one UW Law Latina/o student to intern with a public interest organization and/or any UW law student with a summer internship working with an organization providing access to justice/equal justice to Latina/o communities. This summer grant is a jointly funded initiative by the Latina/o Bar Association of Washington and (LBAW) and the University of Washington School of Law (UW Law).

The purpose of this grant is to support Latina/o UW Law students in pursuit of public interest careers and other UW law students committed to increasing access to justice to Latina/o communities.

Students must first secure an offer of an unpaid summer internship with a public interest employer before applying. For complete information and application instructions please click here.

Funding for UW Law Students is Available for: Citizen University National Conference, Funding Deadline: 1/22!

Citizen University (3.21 conference) Image_Guiding Lights Network

Let’s rekindle citizenship in America! March 20 & 21, 2015

Friday, March 20 at 6:30pm at Fisher Pavilion – Seattle Center

This annual national conference is like no other civic gathering in America. Hundreds of change-makers, activists, and catalysts show up to learn about power, build their networks, and recharge their sense of purpose. They come from across the country, the political spectrum, and a wide range of domains — from immigrant rights to national service, voting reform to veteran re-integration, civic education to Hollywood and tech. They are you.

This is a time when citizens are solving problems in new ways, bypassing broken institutions, stale ideologies, and polarized politics. We are part of a movement to rekindle citizenship in America. We hope you’ll join us

Bring a water bottle, wear comfortable clothing and shoes, and learn how to practice powerful citizenship! http://www.citizenuniversity.us/conference/

If you wish to attend send your request and resume to mestorms@uw.edu by January 22, 11:59 pm.

William L. Dwyer Jury Project Award Writing Competition, Deadline 4/20

William Dwywer

UW Law and the Federal Bar Association of the Western District of Washington are again sponsoring the William L. Dwyer Jury Project Award writing competition. Only UW Law Students (2L/3L/LLM) can enter. 

Judge Dwyer was a respected and beloved Seattle federal district judge who was passionate about protecting the role of juries in our legal system. He cared about this subject so much that wrote an incredible book during his last years of life, called “In the Hands of the People: The Trial Jury’s Origins, Triumphs, Troubles, and Future in American Democracy.” After his death in 2002, his former clerks and the attorneys who appeared before him created this writing competition to honor his legacy. 

To enter, write a paper on the American jury system (including the grand jury system! Papers about Ferguson, New York, and other recent events are welcome). Polish and submit a paper you are already writing for a class, or write a paper specifically for the competition. The paper can be a traditional law-review style scholarly article, an essay or magazine-style article, an empirical analysis (e.g., of jury composition or awards in one or more jurisdictions or types of cases), etc. You can view past winning papers here: http://www.law.washington.edu/Writing/competitions.aspx 

First prize this year is $2,500. A second prize of $500 may also be awarded. The winning paper may also be published in the Federal Bar News. 

Washington State Bar Foundation Seeks Law Student Trustee for Board of Trustees

WSBF

The Washington State Bar Association Board of Governors is currently seeking a law student to fill the position of Student Trustee on the Washington State Bar Foundation Board of Trustees.  The Bar Foundation is the fundraising arm of the WSBA.  Its mission is to provide financial support for WSBA programs that promote diversity within the legal profession and that enhance the public’s access to, and understanding of, the justice system. Bar Foundation funding helps to power vital programs like the WSBA Moderate Means Program, WSBA Call to Duty, and more. 

Candidates must have completed at least one academic year at one of Washington’s law schools.  The ideal candidate will be passionate about diversity and public service within the legal profession, and will have experience with nonprofit leadership and fundraising. 

This Student Trustee’s term will begin upon appointment, will last for the duration of the student’s time in law school, and may be renewed upon graduation. Trustees are stewards of the Bar Foundation, a nonprofit public charity, and are actively involved in all aspects of donor development.  The Student Trustee helps connect students from all three Washington law schools with the Bar Foundation and the WSBA programs it supports. 

To learn more about duties and time commitments, please contact Megan McNally, Director of Advancement, at meganm@wsba.org, or (206) 727-8272. To be considered, please submit a cover letter and résumé by email to foundation@wsba.org.

Newsflash! Millennials are More Likely to Volunteer!

December 29, 2014, The Associated Press

Photo courtesy: Flickr/Alex Pearson
Employees from Yahoo! at a volunteer day in 2011.

WASHINGTON — Tired of hearing people grouse about a tuned-out, apathetic younger generation?

Well, here’s a comeback: Today’s young Americans are more serious about giving back than their parents were.

In fact, those under age 30 now are more likely to say citizens have a “very important obligation” to volunteer, an Associated Press-GfK poll finds.

The embrace of volunteering is striking because young people’s commitment to other civic duties — such as voting, serving on a jury and staying informed — has dropped sharply from their parents’ generation and is lower than that of Americans overall.

Among six civic activities in the AP-GfK poll, volunteering is the only one that adults under 30 rated as highly as older people did.

“I want to make my city where I live a better place,” Morgan Gress, 24, of Washington said after sorting and hanging donated clothes with co-workers who chose to volunteer in lieu of an office holiday party. After you volunteer, she said, “You never walk away feeling you didn’t have a great time, or help someone out, or learn something new.”

Today’s young adults grew up amid nudges from a volunteering infrastructure that has grown exponentially since their parents’ day, when the message typically came through churches or scouting. Continue reading here.