Summer Funding Options, Opportunities for Service & Using Mindfulness to Mitigate Bias

How Will YOU  Fund your Public Service Internship this Summer?

piggybankBy Aline Carton-Listfjeld, Center for Public Service Law

At UW Law we are lucky to have a powerhouse student organization like PILA and a supportive administration which fundraises tons of money to help support summer public service internships. Unfortunately, there are always more deserving applicants than there is funding. So, are you going to put all of your eggs in your PILA basket or are you going to do some research and apply for many other funding sources that are out there? Hint: the latter.

Check out all the great summer funding resources on the Center for Public Service Law’s quick  reference guide (under summer funding towards the bottom of the page). These include labor and employment specific funding, LGBT rights funding, civil legal aid funding, human rights funding, international funding, and new for this year Latina/o advocacy  funding (just to name a few). Application deadlines tend to range between December through April with the bulk due in March/April giving you time to secure your summer internship. We highlight some of the most common sources of summer funding that UW Law students have applied for and obtained. But wait, there’s more! Also check out the great resources compiled by our friends at PSJD here and here. Investing a few hours in research and applications will pay huge dividends (literally). Don’t miss out!

If you missed our lunchtime presentation today don’t fret. Here are the slides to help you connect the dots.

New research finds implicit bias can be tamed through the use of time-honored meditation techniques.

trayvon-protestDecember 2, 2014 By Tom Jacobs, Pacific Standard- The Science of Society

A large crowd gathers to peacefully protest the Trayvon Martin murder case in Union Square in Manhattan on July 14, 2013. (Photo: Marie Havens/Shutterstock)

Racial bias has declined drastically in the United States over the past few decades. And yet, recent reaction to the tragic events in Ferguson, Missouri, suggests race continues to color our opinions, with both blacks and whites holding firm assumptions that their counterparts completely reject.

It’s something of a conundrum, until you consider implicit beliefs—the automatic thoughts and feelings that arise when one looks at an image of someone of another race. While these often operate below our level of consciousness, they shape our views of society and opinions on such policy issues as affirmative action, voter ID laws, and whether the justice system is genuinely just.

Fortunately, new research has documented a surprisingly simple way to short-circuit these knee-jerk negative associations. The key, according to Central Michigan University psychologists Adam Lueke and Bryan Gibson, is mindfulness.

Whites have “quicker response times for words that represent good things when paired with white faces than with black faces, and quicker response times for words that represent bad things when paired with black faces than white faces.” Continue reading here.

Attention Pro Bono Attorneys! Opportunity to Support Homeless Advocacy.

Homeless

SHARE is a homeless shelter in Seattle served by the Homeless Experience Legal Protection program. Presently, two matters are of huge concern to its community, as to which it is seeking pro bono legal representation. One concerns Nickelsville, an independent encampment of homeless people that is following all the legal obligations put upon it by the City of Seattle & etc. They are not receiving the same police services as other encampments, shelters and transitional housing projects and it is jeopardizing their safety and future. SHARE needs to figure out a way to get SPD to provide its residents the same support they provide others. The second issue concerns the complete defunding of SHARE – the county’s largest shelter provider – by King County Government. SHARE is also by far the most cost effective shelter outfit per bed night. SHARE would like to challenge the County’s defunding on numerous grounds – procedural, legal, common sense and political. This defunding isn’t something we can just let sit – the County Council is going to have to reconsider the whole thing sometime. If a lawyer in your firm is interested in either project, please have him/her contact Scott Morrow at Share Shelters shelters@sharewheel.org

Attention Lawyers & Community Members Committed to Social Justice! Washington State Access to Justice Board Seeks New Board Members. Application Due This Friday, January 9. Act Fast!

ATJ Board announcement