New Year’s Special Edition Internships!

Want an Interview at the NW Public Service Career Fair? Application Deadline through Career Fair Website is January 13!

NW PS Career Fair logo

Important Reminder! Friday, January 31 is the Seattle fair. Saturday, February 1 is the Portland fair.

But…  if you want to interview for jobs or internships at the fair you MUST submit your application materials by January 13 through the career fair website.

Check out the full list of public service legal employers who will be at the career fair in Seattle and Portland this year. Remember, employers are still signing up on a rolling basis so make sure you have your application materials ready to go and upload them through the career fair website.

International Corporate Accountability Roundtable Seeks Legal &Policy Intern

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The International Corporate Accountability Roundtable (ICAR) is a coalition of human rights, environmental, labor, and development organizations that creates, promotes and defends legal frameworks to ensure corporations respect human rights in their global operations.

ICAR seeks a bright and dedicated law student to work as an intern on a number of corporate accountability and human rights initiatives.

The intern will assist with various ICAR initiatives, including but not limited to:

  • Promoting human rights due diligence;
  • Ensuring access to effective judicial remedies for human rights victims;
  • Developing model National Action Plans for the implementation of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights;
  • Working human rights considerations into public procurement policy;
  • Developing human rights standards for private security providers.

To learn more about this position and for full application instructions please click here for the announcement in PSJD. Applications reviewed on a rolling basis through January 15.

New York Legal Assistance Group Now Accepting Apps for Summer Legal Intern Program

NYLAG

The New York Legal Assistance Group (NYLAG) provides free civil legal services to low-income New Yorkers.  NYLAG clients include immigrants, seniors, the homebound, families facing foreclosure, renters facing eviction, low-income consumers, those in need of government assistance, children in need of special education, domestic violence survivors, persons with disabilities, patients with chronic illness or disease, low-wage workers, low-income members of the LGBT community, Holocaust survivors, and others in need.

To enhance the level of services available in New York, and to help train the next generation of public interest lawyers, NYLAG is recruiting a class of law student summer interns for the positions listed below.  Each position requires a full-time commitment of 10 weeks (generally, May 27th to August 1st) and is unpaid.  In addition to handling substantive work at NYLAG, interns will have the opportunity to participate in a comprehensive training service that covers the breadth of civil legal services practice in New York City, as well as a series of brown bag lunches on fellowships, clerkships and other topics of interest, and social events in and around NYLAG’s office in lower Manhattan.

Applicants (rising 2Ls and 3Ls) should have excellent research, writing, and analytical skills, and a strong commitment to public interest law.  To apply, submit a cover letter and resume to volunteer@nylag.org.   Applicants may be considered to for more than one position, but should indicate in a cover letter which positions are of interest and describe relevant experience.  Applications are accepted on a rolling basis, and recruiting is expected to be completed by March 31, 2014.

Learn more about all of the various NYLAG internships click here.

Planned Parenthood Federation of America Seeking Summer Policy & Legal Interns for NY & DC Offices

Planned ParenthoodPlanned Parenthood Federation of America (PPFA) is the nation’s leading women’s health care provider, educator, and advocate, serving women, men, teens, and families. For more than 90 years, we’ve done more than any other organization in the United States to improve women’s health and safety, prevent unintended pregnancies, and guarantee that safe and legal abortion services are available to women who need them.

The Public Policy Litigation and Law Department of PPFA seeks 1L and 2L law student interns for its New York and Washington, D.C. offices for the summer of 2014.

PPFA conducts reproductive rights litigation in state and federal courts across the country, and has been lead or co-counsel in most of the major reproductive rights cases over the past 15 years. PPFA also provides strategic legal advice on legislation in Congress and state legislatures and on regulatory issues at the national, state, and local levels.

Our litigation docket includes federal and state court challenges to laws and policies that restrict access to abortion and other reproductive health services. We also initiate litigation designed to expand access to reproductive health services and to protect providers of those services.  Interns can expect to work closely with PPFA attorneys on a wide variety of litigation responsibilities, including legal research and analysis; drafting memoranda, pleadings, affidavits, and briefs; factual development for ongoing or developing litigation; and communicating with clients.

Applications reviewed on rolling basis through February 28. Early applications encouraged.  For complete info and application instructions please click here for PSJD announcement.

Happy New Year Jobs Edition for 3Ls & Recent Grads!

White House Fellows Program Now Accepting Applications


Founded in 1964, the White House Fellows program is one of America’s most prestigious programs for leadership and public service. White House Fellowships offer exceptional young men and women first-hand experience working at the highest levels of the federal government.

Selected individuals typically spend a year working as a full-time, paid Fellow to senior White House Staff, Cabinet Secretaries and other top-ranking government officials. Fellows also participate in an education program consisting of roundtable discussions with renowned leaders from the private and public sectors, and trips to study U.S. policy in action both domestically and internationally. Fellowships are awarded on a strictly non-partisan basis.

Act fast! Applications due no later than January 15. For more info click here. To access the application click here.

Earthjustice Seeking Entry-Level Associate Attorney in Alaska

EarthJustice

The Alaska office of Earthjustice is seeking applications for an associate attorney position.  The core issues of the Alaska office docket are protection of the Alaska coastal rain forest, safeguarding of America’s Arctic, conservation of the Bering Sea and Gulf of Alaska marine ecosystem, wildlife conservation, protection of lands and waters from mining activities, air and water quality enforcement, and national park and other public lands management.  Our clients include national, regional and local conservation organizations, Alaska Native tribal organizations, ecotourism businesses, and communities, as well as other organizations concerned about enforcing the laws to protect the environment.

Among other responsibilities, the associate will

  • Conduct legal research and prepare memoranda on issues relating to ongoing or potential      litigation projects;
  • Draft motions, briefs and other pleadings;
  • Prepare comments on proposed agency actions and environmental impact statements;
  • Assist with discovery; and
  • Interact with clients and work with experts.

The associate attorney may have primary responsibility for some matters but will generally work collaboratively with other lawyers in the office.

For complete description and application instructions please click here. Act fast! Applications reviewed on a rolling basis.

Disability Rights Washington Hiring Resource Attorney

DRW

Disability Rights Washington (DRW), a private non-profit organization advocating for the rights of people with disabilities seeks an attorney to advocate on behalf of people with disabilities across Washington.

The attorney will spend a significant portion of his or her time assisting people with disabilities who call and write about legal issues to gain information about their rights and strategies to improve their self advocacy efforts. Responsibilities also include responding to allegations of abuse and neglect, developing and disseminating information and referral resources, and investigation into systemic legal violations regarding individuals with disabilities.

The attorney must have very strong oral and written communication skills.  Additionally, the attorney must be an organized, self-motivated professional who is able to work collaboratively with other DRW staff to engage in creative, multimodal advocacy strategies to achieve social justice for Washingtonians with psychiatric, developmental, sensory, and physical disabilities.

DRW is designated by the governor as the independent federally-mandated protection and advocacy system for Washington State. As such, DRW promotes, expands, and protects the human and civil rights of people with disabilities.

Excellent research and writing skills, academic performance, and references are required. Attorneys with disabilities and attorneys with bilingual fluency are strongly encouraged to apply.

For complete information and application instructions please click here. Applications reviewed on a rolling basis through January 13.

Applications for NWIRP Attorney Position in Tacoma are due January 6

NWIRP

The Northwest Immigrant Rights Project (NWIRP) seeks a bilingual attorney (with strong preference for a Spanish-speaking attorney) to work with individuals detained at the Northwest Detention Center, a regional immigration detention facility that houses up to 1575 detainees. The attorney will be providing legal representation and assistance to individuals in removal proceedings.

The attorney will provide legal services under the Legal Orientation Program (“LOP”), which is funded by the Executive Office for Immigration Review and managed by the Vera Institute. Through the LOP, NWIRP staff give detained individuals essential information about court procedures and available options for legal relief prior to their immigration hearing. The LOP consists of four primary components: (1) group orientations; (2) individual sessions; (3) self-help training in the form of pro se workshops; and (4) referral of cases to pro bono attorneys. Information about the LOP can be found at the Department of Justice website (http://www.justice.gov/eoir/probono/probono.htm) and the Vera Institute website (http://www.vera.org/project/legal-orientation-program).

The attorney will also provide direct representation to detained persons in removal proceedings, including representation at the Tacoma or Seattle Immigration Courts, the Board of Immigration Appeals and the Ninth Circuit court of appeals. Between the LOP and direct representation work, attorneys will be managing a high-volume workload with complex legal issues in immigration and criminal law.

Special consideration will be given to attorneys with at least two years of prior relevant legal experience, but all applicants with the qualifications listed below are welcome to apply.

Applications due by January 6! For complete description and application instructions please click here.

Announcing the Fulbright-Clinton Fellowship- Apps Due January 10

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Friday Special- Too Many Great Opportunities to Pass Up!

Council on American-Islamic Relations Has Immediate Opening for Civil Rights Associate for WA State Chapter

CAIR

The Washington state chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR-WA) is seeking a goal-driven and highly organized professional for the key Civil Rights Associate (CRA) position. The civil rights department responds to complaints from members of the Muslim community about civil rights violations, and develops response strategies to effect positive societal changes.

Responsibilities include:

  • Case management/resolution
    • Oversee cases of religious discrimination, profiling, and denial of religious accommodations, spanning across law enforcement, employment, education, immigration, vandalism, hate crimes, and jail/prison conditions.
    • Ensure follow-through with offending parties and clients, and assertively pursue full resolution.
    • Maintain databases and metrics about abuses reported to CAIR-WA.
    • Develop civil rights department’s procedures and capabilities, e.g.: investigation skills and protocols; case management process (intake/documentation/review).
    • Expand referral network for cases outside of CAIR-WA’s scope.
    • Effectively manage 2-3 competent civil rights interns and/or volunteers to maximize department capacity.
  • Develop winning advocacy strategies
    • Develop strategies such as advocacy letters/meetings, media work, and network of volunteer attorneys.
    • Develop strategic relationships with senior government, law enforcement, and other officials to drive desired outcomes and policy changes.
    • Collaborate with civil rights activists nationally, across CAIR chapters and partner organizations, to ensure the local success of nationwide campaigns or mutually beneficial efforts.
    • Partner with the executive director to maximize media exposure and public awareness of CAIR-WA’s efforts, including drafting press releases, speaking at press conferences, and aggressively pursuing positive media opportunities related to casework.
  • Community education
    • Seek opportunities to deliver “know your rights” presentations and information at schools, organizations, and religious institutions to increase case reporting.
    • Produce monthly online digests and case studies, and an annual report to inform the public of CAIR-WA’s civil rights efforts and to encourage reporting of cases by the community.
    • Proactively maintain contact with mosques and community organizations across the Northwest to ensure public safety and increase case reporting.
    • Contribute to CAIR-WA’s social media outlets including Facebook and Twitter.

For complete description and application instructions please click here. Applications reviewed on a rolling basis. Position is open until filled.

Paid Farmworker Justice Internships with Columbia Legal Services

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Columbia Legal Services seeks up to three farm worker justice interns who will work on farm worker advocacy cases and projects in one of the following offices: Kennewick, Yakima and, if funding is available, Olympia.  All applicants must have the ability to communicate effectively in verbal Spanish.  The Laurel Rubin Farmworker Justice Project funds successful applicants at $5,500 for the 10-12 week internship.

The Laurel Rubin Farm Worker Justice interns will support the advocacy of the CLS Projects as they relates to farm workers. Working as part of a statewide outreach team, the interns will participate in efforts to educate farm workers about their basic employment rights and other relevant topics through visits to farmworker housing, presentations and meetings with community groups, and radio advocacy. The interns will also do legal research, prepare written memoranda, and provide support for litigation, legislative or administrative advocacy on behalf of farm workers.  Every effort will be made to provide interns with the opportunity to work on an advocacy project on behalf of an individual worker or family and therefore the intern will likely have some opportunity to work on client interviewing skills.

Act fast! Applications reviewed on a rolling basis. For complete job description and application instructions please click here.

University of Baltimore School of Law Seeks Family Law Clinical Teaching Fellow

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The University of Baltimore School of Law invites applications for a Fellowship in its Family Law Clinic to start on or around July 1, 2014. This public interest fellowship program offers practicing attorneys exposure to law school clinical teaching.

The Family Law Clinic represents low-income individuals and organizations in domestic violence and family law litigation, legislative advocacy, legal reform and community education.  The Clinic handles a wide variety of cases, which include civil protection order, divorce, custody, support, adoption, paternity, Special Immigrant Juvenile Cases and name changes.  The Family Law Clinic is dedicated to serving low income clients residing in Baltimore City, and places a special focus on persons subjected to abuse and the LGBTQ community.

The Fellow’s duties include direct supervision of clinic students’ client, case, legislative advocacy and community education work, co-teaching a weekly clinic seminar, and engaging in course planning and preparation with the other faculty members in the Family Law Clinic.  Fellows also have the opportunity to pursue other professional goals, including scholarship, during the Fellowship.  Fellows are responsible for case coverage during school vacations.  This position is a contractual appointment for up to two years and can be extended for a third year under certain circumstances.

Applications accepted on rolling basis through January 17. For complete job description and application instructions please click here.

Paid Education Equity/Justice Summer Internship through the Southern Education Leadership Initiative


Southern Education Foundation aspires to develop the next generation of education policy leadership, and since 2004 has provided trainings and paid summer fellowships to a diverse and inspired group of 165 college and graduate level students interested in working with nonprofits and foundations to make systemic changes in Southern education policy and practice.

Summer Fellows Receive:
  • Experience: an opportunity to work for eight weeks in an organization concerned with equity and excellence in education e.g., a policy institution, community-based organization or philanthropic institution;
  • Stipend: a living expense stipend of $4,000 (for undergraduate juniors or graduating seniors), or $4,500 (for graduate students who will have completed at least one term by June 1, 2014);
  • Travel: all airfare/car mileage expenses associated with traveling to and from SEF trainings to summer placement site (assistance also provided by SEF in making travel arrangements);
  • Trainings: Fellows are provided pre- and post-placement trainings (Orientation and Closing Meeting) that expose them to research in the field, stress the importance of civic engagement, teach strategies for making change, and provide opportunities to meet and learn from inspiring leaders involved in education leadership and advocacy efforts. At the Closing Meeting, fellows will present their work to their peers, reflect, and brainstorm how to take the lessons learned from this experience back to their communities. Attendance is required for both meetings in full.
  • Fellowship Placement: guidance and supervision provided by seasoned sector leaders to work on challenging research, education policy, and nonprofit program related projects.
Read more and access application here. Applications accepted through February 28.

The National Tribal Judicial Center at the National Judicial College Seeks Program Attorney njc-logo

The National Judicial College seeks a team-oriented individual to fill the position of program attorney for the National Tribal Judicial Center.  Under the supervision of the Director of NTJC, program attorney responsibilities include developing academic courses on a variety of topics and issues in the area of tribal judicial education, preparing course materials, planning and conducting courses, and seeking further funding to support the work of the National Tribal Judicial Center and other NTJC projects.

POSITION SUMMARY:

Develops, implements and continually strives to improve continuing education programs for tribal judges.  Identifies, recruits, develops and evaluates faculty.  Assists faculty with production of course materials.  Drafts publications for use by tribal court systems.   Writes, solicits and edits articles regarding tribal systems for publication.  Drafts curricula and grant applications to support tribal programs.  Assists with marketing and program development of the National Tribal Judicial Center.  Establishes strong networks within Indian Country.

For complete description and application instructions please click here.

It’s Winter Break so Now’s a Great Time for Some Career Strategizing Refresher FAQs!

How Do I Apply for a Judicial Externship?

judicialbranchExternships are available with many state and federal judges during the summer and throughout the school-year, in the greater-Seattle area and around the country. Making a decision to apply and determining to which judges one should apply calls for planning and strategy. Students who are considering a judicial externship are encouraged to meet with their professional development coaches soon to discuss their plans and to have their application material reviewed.

Many judges select externs on a rolling basis, and positions may be filled several quarters ahead, so students should begin the application process early.

Learn everything you need to know about judicial externships and the application process on the law school’s judicial externships page here.

How Can I Learn More About Judicial Clerkships?

A judicial clerkship is a highly rewarding and intellectually satisfying post graduate job.  Judicial clerks sharpen their research and writing skills, are exposed to a variety of legal issues, and gain insight into the entire litigation process.

Before doing anything carefully read through our Judicial Clerkship Manual. Don’t miss out! Most of your questions will be answered by reading this really important document! Then, start researching opportunities by clicking here.

What’s the Scoop on this PSJD I Keep Hearing About?

psjd_logoPSJD – formerly PSLawNet – is a unique online clearinghouse for law students and lawyers to connect with public interest job listings and career-building resources.  As a collaborative project among over 200 American and Canadian law schools, PSJD is a free resource for law students and alumni of their subscriber schools to search among thousands of public interest job opportunities and employer profiles.  Employer organizations may also post job opportunities for free.  In addition to its database, PSJD offers an online library of educational and career-building resources for those interested in pursuing a career in public service.  These resources are publicly available to all website visitors.

For Job Seekers

Job listings in the PSJD database include internships (fall, spring, and summer), postgraduate fellowships, and a wide variety of permanent positions.  PSJD also includes over 13,000 organizational profiles for nonprofit, government, and other public interest employers spanning the globe.  Registered users may search the database, flag and store opportunities for later viewing, receive email alerts with newly posted opportunities, and apply directly for opportunities via PSJD.

New to PSJD? Students and alumni at subscriber law schools may register for free.  Individual subscriptions are also available for those not affiliated with a subscriber school.  Register here.  For tips on using the site, visit the How to Use PSJD page.

Did You do an Internship, Externship or Have You Volunteered Recently? Your Peers Can Learn from Your Experience!

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Celebrate the Holidays by Applying for an Awesome Job or Internship!

National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty Seeks Legal Interns/Externs Year-Round

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The National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty seeks diverse, well-qualified candidates with a passion for social justice. The Law Center offers sponsor-paid and unpaid fellowships, internships, and pro bono opportunities. The Law Center is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Persons of color, LGBT persons, and persons with disabilities are especially encouraged to apply.

Legal Internships/Externships:
Legal internships are available year-round to second- and third-year law students. If you are interested in applying for an internship, please submit a cover letter, resume, 2-5 page writing sample, and two to three references to Janelle Fernandez. Internships are unpaid, but academic credit may be available. Applications accepted on a rolling basis.

Meridian Institute Policy Fellowship

Meridian

Meridian Institute is pleased to announce position openings within the Meridian Institute Fellowship Program – an opportunity for recent college graduates to work on varied and highly complex public policy issues, learn about the field of multi-party collaborative problem solving, and engage with leaders from a variety of sectors and interest groups. Meridian Institute has two offices (Washington DC and Dillon, CO) and fellows may be placed in either office, depending on staffing needs and their preferences.

Meridian Institute professionals combine extensive experience in collaborative process design, deep substantive knowledge, and proven mediation skills to help people engaged in society’s toughest issues to solve problems and make informed decisions. At Meridian, we design collaborative approaches that bring together people who understand the issues and have a stake in their resolution. In addition to process design, facilitation, mediation, and strategy assessment and planning, Meridian offers expert administrative and meeting logistics services and the creative and appropriate application of information technology tools, to support our projects. Some of the topics we work on include: Agriculture and Food Security; Climate Change and Energy; Environment and Natural Resources; Global Stability and Security; Health; Sustainability and Resilience; and Science and Technology

Applications due no later than February 7. Start date between June 1 and July 1, 2014. For complete description and application instructions please click here.

National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers Seeking Summer Fellows

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The National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers (NACDL) is seeking up to three (3) Minority Law Fellows to match with exceptional, experienced, criminal defense attorney members for up to eight (8) weeks working in a criminal defense law practice.

The purpose of the fellowship is to advance diversity in the criminal defense community by giving law school students from underrepresented groups an opportunity to gain experience in a criminal defense law practice. Fellows will actively intern in Washington, D.C., New York, NY, or Denver, CO.  Each Fellow will receive a weekly stipend of $500.00.

For complete description and application instructions please click here. Applications due no later than January 15.

New Mexico Legal Aid Seeks Staff Attorney for Rural Office

NMLA

New Mexico Legal Aid is seeking a staff attorney to join our Silver City office. The Silver City staff attorney will represent low-income individuals and families in a wide variety of poverty law areas including family law, housing, public benefits, and consumer issues. The attorney will be active in local bar and community activities.  The work also will include participating in community education and outreach to eligible clients; and recruitment of and collaboration with pro bono attorneys.

The Silver City office handles creative, challenging and complex work throughout southwestern and west central New Mexico. We are looking for highly motivated candidates who are passionate and strongly committed to helping NMLA better serve rural communities, including development of effective team strategies to handle complex advocacy and extended representation cases.

Requirements:  Experience with advocacy in rural communities will be highly preferred. Must be willing to travel. Candidates also must possess excellent written and oral communication skills, the ability to manage multiple tasks, manage a significant caseload and build collaborative relationships within the staff and the community.  Proficiency in Spanish is a plus.

Send a current resume, a list of three references, and a letter of interest explaining what you would like to accomplish if you are selected for this position to:  Gloria Molinar at: jobs@nmlegalaid.org

Salary:  DOE, NMLA is an EEO Employer.  Deadline to apply is January 3rd, 2014.

Eastside Legal Assistance Program Seeks New Program Director

ELAP_2012_Logo_for_web_mod_3_AEH_560x560We are looking for a highly motivated person to manage our volunteer legal services programs. The person will work independently and with others to help meet the legal needs of low income people and survivors of domestic violence. The perfect candidate will also be able to assist in expanding funding resources available to (ELAP).

Responsibilities include but are not limited to:

1. Providing direct oversight of program services (legal advice clinics, lectures, brief services, direct representation, and interpreters) including monthly, quarterly, and yearly reports to the Executive Director

2. Supervising Clinic Coordinator and Community Outreach Manager

3. Overseeing organizing lectures, workshops, and Continuing Legal Education classes

4. Developing new program services to provide legal services to underserved clients

5. Developing and maintaining relationships with community partners in East King County, in the domestic violence community, and the legal community

6. Recruiting, training and supporting volunteer attorneys in coordination with the DVLP Managing Attorney

7. Maintaining good communication and positive relationships with volunteer attorneys to promote continued involvement with ELAP

8. Supervising Volunteer Manager

9. Overseeing recruiting, training and managing of office and clinic volunteers

10. Researching and analyzing data pertaining to the need for legal services in East and North King County

11. Assisting the Executive Director in development and fundraising activities

For complete description and application instructions please click here. Applications accepted on a rolling basis.

Appellate Public Defense Externship Opportunity in Olympia

scalesSmall Olympia firm dedicated exclusively to appellate public defense is looking for a law student to help with research and writing.  We are simultaneously laid-back and passionate about doing an awesome job for our clients.  Extern will research issues and draft arguments for specific cases.  Extern will also research issues affecting the criminal justice system as a whole.  Extern will learn about appellate practice, legal writing, and issue-spotting.  Excellent experience for someone interested in either appellate or trial-level indigent defense.

We’re flexible about the number of hours per week and whether the extern works from our office, remotely, or a combination of the two.

Qualifications:

  • Dedicated commitment to indigent criminal defense.
  • Current 2L or 3L.
  • Outstanding legal research and writing skills.
  • Willingness to pursue outlandish legal issues.
  • Working knowledge of criminal law and criminal procedure.

Send a cover letter, resume, writing sample, and list of references to backlundmistry@gmail.com

Entry-Level Grant County Public Defender Position Opens Up 

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The Public Defender provides criminal defense to indigent persons in Grant County Superior Court, Grant County District Court and the Juvenile Division of the Grant County Superior Court. Compliance with Performance Guidelines; Client Representation and Responding to Client Complaints; Participation in all Aspects of the Criminal Defense System to Provide Effective Assistance of Counsel; Tracking Caseloads, Time Tracking Systems; Commitment to Grant County Mission, Vision and Code of Ethics; Employee must comply with all county policies and procedures.

For full description, benefit information, and to submit an online application in order to be eligible please go to: www.grantcountyweb.com. Applications accepted through December 31.

Public Advocates Seeks Civil Rights Policy Advocate/Attorney

public-advocates-logoPublic Advocates Inc., a bold and highly-regarded civil rights law firm and advocacy group, has a rare opening for an attorney to join our exceptional and dedicated staff. Our goal is to eradicate poverty and discrimination and promote thriving communities. For forty-two years Public Advocates has used a diverse set of legal and policy tools to achieve tangible legal victories and help low-income communities of color build their power to participate effectively in public decision-making. We are seeking an experienced policy advocate and/or attorney to join Public Advocates’ transportation, housing and climate justice team. Learn more about our work in these areas. Responsibilities

  • Policy Development: Develop, analyze and promote policy change in the areas of affordable housing, equitable development, public transportation and climate justice at the state and regional levels.
  • Legislative and Administrative Advocacy: Promote the policy agenda of Public Advocates and our coalition partners in Sacramento, in both legislative and administrative agency decisions affecting the needs of disadvantaged communities, and in Bay Area regional policy and investment decisions.
  • Coalition Leadership: Effectively and strategically co-lead large and sophisticated state and regional coalitions in policy, investment and budget campaigns.
  • Strategy: Help shape strategic directions in our housing, transportation, regional equity and climate justice work, incorporating policy advocacy, community collaboration, research, and media and communication to achieve our objectives.
  • Communication: Develop and execute outreach and media strategies, including messaging, community education, writing and representing Public Advocates and coalitions to the press and public.
  • Resource development: Help identify and pursue funding opportunities and contribute to foundation relations.

Applications reviewed on a rolling basis. For complete description and application instructions please click here.

Free Debt Relief Webinar, MLK Events and Save the Date for Mindfulness & the Practice of Law Retreat

December 18: Drowning in Debt? Learn How Gov’t & Non-Profit Workers Can Earn Public Service Loan Forgiveness- Free Webinar

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Wednesday, December 18, from 12-1p.m. PST.

Hosted by Equal Justice Works.

To register click here: Drowning in Debt? How Government and Nonprofit Workers Can Earn Public Service Loan Forgiveness. As always, we’ll cover how income-driven repayment plans and Public Service Loan Forgiveness in-depth can help you manage your student debt and control your career and financial future.

A must attend for anyone with student debt, this free webinar explains how to reduce your monthly student loan payments and qualify for Public Service Loan Forgiveness. After the presentation (whether you are able to attend or not), you will be emailed a recording of the session that you can view at any time.

January 20: MLK Celebration Seattle Events

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Don’t miss out on all of the fantastic opportunities to celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s birthday and promote social and economic justice! Learn about all of the day’s activities and how to get involved here.

March 29: Save the Date! Integrating Mindfulness & Legal Practice- Washington Contemplative Lawyers Retreat on Vashon Island

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Saturday, March 29, 10am-4:30pm

Cost: less than $20

Washington Contemplative Lawyers invites all lawyers, law students, law professors, and judges to join us for a day of basic mindfulness meditation instruction, guided practice, group discussion, and a potluck lunch in the beautiful Mann Studio at Ellisport beach on Vashon Island.

Appropriate for all levels of experience…beginners especially welcome! Instruction is secular and appropriate for persons of all backgrounds and beliefs.

For general information on mindfulness for legal professionals, a suggested resource is “The Meditative Perspective” located at the following link: http://www.spiritrock.org/document.doc?id=2153

For more information and registration please contact Sevilla Rhoads at SRhoads@gsblaw.com and take a look at our website: http://wacontemplativelaw.blogspot.com

Due to limited space at the retreat center, we need advance registration. Costs to be determined, but will be less than $20 per person.

Thank you and we look forward to seeing you in March!

“In this age of unprecedented distraction and information density, every professional needs tools to clear the mind, calm the body and reveal what matters most. It is both a practical, and a personal necessity. “

-Steven Keeva, Transforming Practices: Finding Joy and Satisfaction in the Legal Life

International Human Rights Day News and RSVP Deadline Extended for San Francisco Public Service Visit in January

How About We Celebrate Human Rights Every Day?

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By Anna Crosby, ACLU Human Rights Program

Henry Hill was 16 when he was charged for his involvement in a shooting that took place in a Michigan park. He is now 48 and has spent two-thirds of his life in a prison cell. Although in recent years the Supreme Court has struck down some laws that allow children to be committed to die in prison, the United States remains the last country in the world where children can still be sentenced to serve life without the possibility of parole. While the U.S. has historically provided global leadership on some human rights issues, Henry Hill serves as a grave reminder that we’re still out of step with rest of the world on many of the most fundamental human rights protections.

Sixty-three years ago today, the United Nations General Assembly proclaimed December 10 International Human Rights Day. It celebrates the birthday of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the foundational document expressing our collective will to advance human rights and “strive by progressive measures, national and international, to secure their universal and effective recognition and observance.”

This year also marks the 20th anniversary of the establishment of the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, the principal outcome of the landmark international conference on human rights which took place in Vienna in 1993.

The United States’ track record in some of what the UDHR calls the most basic of rights—the right to life, right to vote, freedom from torture, and economic rights, among others—is greatly in need of improvement. We often don’t practice what we preach. Just last week, at the annual summit hosted by Human Rights First, National Security Advisor Susan Rice publicly criticized the Iranian government for not allowing the U.N. Special Rapporteur on Human Rights to visit the country. The U.S., however, lacks credible leverage to change this policy when it continues to deny U.N. human rights experts unimpeded access to the prison at Guantánamo Bay.

In commemoration of this year’s Human Rights Day, we’re releasing a new fact sheet that provides a critical snapshot of 12 human rights issues the United States is failing to adequately address, including some astounding statistics on persons deprived of their liberty. In 2012, the number of people held in immigration detention reached 410,000 people, an increase of more than 400 percent since 1996. Fueled by over-incarceration policies and discrimination, the incarceration rate in the United States is still the highest in the world. Other issues addressed in our fact sheet include:

  • Women’s Rights
  • Criminal Justice (more specifically, capital punishment, life without parole for children)
  • Voting Rights
  • LGBT Rights
  • Rights of Persons with Disabilities
  • Socioeconomic Rights
  • Racial Profiling
  • Children’s Rights
  • Accountability for Torture

In addition to the areas addressed in the fact sheet, the United States also continues to set a poor example for other countries when it comes to mass surveillancetargeted killings, and more.

As our fact sheet explains:

Without doubt the U.S. continues to provide global leadership on some human rights issues. For example, the current administration provided vigorous leadership in fighting for LGBT equality, combating trafficking, and championing religious freedom and peaceful assembly rights. But while some U.S. laws and policies have been comparatively advanced in protecting civil rights and civil liberties, the U.S. has fallen behind in protecting the universal human rights recognized by the UDHR. Our government has only partially and selectively embraced these rights, ignoring international obligations and widening the gap between the United States’ sixty-five-year-old promise and its own current practice.

As we celebrate Human Rights Day, we cannot forget urgent and ongoing domestic human rights violations, like mass incarceration and juvenile life without parole. For people like Henry Hill, who has spent half of the UDHR‘s history behind bars, paying our respects to human rights once a year won’t get him home.

Twitter link: http://tiny.cc/gcaw7w

Human Rights Report Card Gives U.S. Poor Grades on Housing

NLCHPDecember 10, 2013, Washington D.C. – The National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty released its 2013 Human Right to Housing Report Card today, marked globally as human rights day, reviewing U.S. compliance with the human right to housing in the context of American homelessness over the past year. The report card found that while there were areas of improvement, much more needs to be done.

“In 2010, the federal government released a plan to end and prevent homelessness,” said Maria Foscarinis, Executive Director of the Law Center, “ensuring affordable housing to very low-income people is essential to ending and preventing homelessness, and many of the poor grades we assigned in this year’s report card reflect the failure to prioritize and fund such housing.”

There were encouraging policy developments this year, most notably the Violence-Against Women Act 2013 reauthorization, which significantly expanded housing rights for survivors of domestic violence. Additionally, a federal court mandate upheld the order forcing government compliance with Title V of the McKinney-Vento Act requiring government agencies to make vacant properties available to homeless service agencies.

In another significant development, the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness began holding its member agencies accountable to their human rights obligations, following up on a report it issued with the U.S. department of Justice last year on the criminalization of homelessness and in response to inquiries from the United Nations this year.

“The U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness deserves credit for beginning to hold its member agencies accountable to human rights standards following a question from the UN Human Rights Committee about the criminalization of homelessness in the U.S.,” said Eric Tars, Director of Human Rights & Children’s Rights Programs at the Law Center, “But we have yet to see actions being implemented, and our human rights obligations to our most vulnerable citizens remain compromised.”

In order to improve its grades next year, the Law Center recommends that funds be increased to at least $1 billion per year for federal homelessness prevention programs and $1 billion be devoted to the National Housing Trust Fund. The report also recommends that the Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act become permanent, the right to counsel be assured for all housing cases, and federal agencies develop funding incentives for communities to stop the criminalization of homelessness.

To read the report card, click here. For general inquiries, contact Selam Aberra.

The National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty is a leader in the movement to prevent and end homelessness. To achieve its goal, the Law Center uses three main strategies: policy advocacy, public education, and impact litigation.

Human Rights Essay Award Competition: Persons with Disabilities and International Human Rights Law

Academy of HR & Humanitarian Law

Deadline: February 1, 2014

This annual competition sponsored by the Academy on Human Rights and Humanitarian Law at American University Washington College of Law seeks to stimulate the production of scholarly work in international human rights law.

The 2014 topic is Persons with Disabilities and International Human Rights Law. Participants have the flexibility to choose any subject related to the assigned topic. The best articles may be published in the American University International Law Review.

The Academy will grant two Awards, one for the best article in English and one for the best article in Spanish. The Award in each case will consist of:

  • a scholarship to the Academy’s Program of Advanced Studies
  • travel expenses to and from Washington D.C.
  • housing at the university dorms
  • a per diem for living expenses

For detailed guidelines about the award please click here.

Deadline Extended! RSVP By December 17, 5pm ! San Francisco Public Service Employer Visit

SF

2014 SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SERVICE CITY VISIT: JANUARY 17, 2014

The  Center for Public Service Law has planned our third annual San Francisco  Public Interest Law City Visit for Friday, January 17, 2014.  On that day we will visit 4 public interest/public service agencies – two in Oakland  and two in San Francisco.  This year we will visit a variety of  organizations including the National Council on Crime and Delinquency, the US Citizen and Immigration Services (USCIS), the California Department of Justice (Attorney General’s Office) and the Ella Baker Center for Human Rights.  Over the past two years 13 UW Law students have taken this trip and visited different public service and public interest sites, receiving excellent exposure to public service law in San Francisco.

Who may attend?  UW law students.

Why attend? If you are interested in seeking summer positions in the San Francisco Bay Area or if you think you might practice public interest law in the Bay Area after graduating then this is a great opportunity to get a sense of the lay of the land.  At each place we visit, the  organization will give us a brief presentation and then lawyers on staff will answer our questions.  Meeting the public interest lawyers in these offices will help you to begin building relationships — which is vital to “breaking in” to a new community.  None of the employers we visit can guarantee our jobs for students, but students have created important connections and at least one secured an externship.  Two other organizations we have visited have welcomed collaborative projects with students or hosted Equal Justice  Works fellowship applications, based on us establishing relationships with them through the city visits.

What are the expenses? You must pay for your own airfare and lodging. On Friday we will provide lunch and public transportation fees.  Participants will be eligible for up to $150 reimbursement of documented travel expenses.

How to RSVP:  contact Dean Storms at mestorms@uw.edu if you are interested in attending or if you have additional questions.  Please do so by December 17 5pm as  we will want to confirm a minimum number of participants in order to go forward with the trip.