Bountiful Summer 2014 Internships, Urban Justice Center Hiring for Veterans’ Advocacy & Spokane County Bar Hiring Volunteer Lawyer Program Coordinator

Summer 2014 Goldmark Equal Justice Paid Internship at Unemployment Law Project in Seattle or Spokane

Unemployment ClaimsThe Unemployment Law Project (ULP) provides legal representation to unemployed workers of Washington State who have been denied unemployment benefits or whose right to those benefits is challenged.

A “total immersion” experience, the legal intern will work with ULP staff on all levels of client assistance, including client intake interviews, case review, representation at administrative hearings, written appeals to the Commissioner of the Employment Security Department, and possible appeals to the Superior Courts and Courts of Appeal.

The internship is open to law students who have completed their second year prior to the summer of 2014 and to recent law school graduates. The successful candidate will display proficiency in case review and identification of issues, excellent writing abilities and have client intake experience. Although being Rule 9 qualified is not a requirement, being so might open up additional advocacy opportunities.

Interviewing on average two to four potential clients a week, the intern will prepare for and represent clients at an average of one to three hearings a week, as well as meet each of those clients, in person or telephonically, at a pre-hearing conference in preparation for each hearing. The intern will be responsible for identifying the legal issues in assigned cases, researching applicable law, and formulating a written theory of both the client’s and the employer’s case.

This is 10 week internship with a $8000 stipend. Applications accepted on a rolling basis through October 11. For complete application information and instructions please click here.

Summer 2014 Internship with the Office of Counsel to the Inspector General of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)

HHSThe Office of Counsel to the Inspector General (OCIG) for the United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) seeks second year law students with a demonstrated interest in public service and health care law. We anticipate selecting applicants for two to four unpaid summer law clerk positions lasting approximately ten weeks during the summer of 2014.

OCIG promotes the mission of the Office of Inspector General (OIG) through timely, accurate, and persuasive legal advocacy and counsel. Legal interns will investigate cases, perform legal research, draft briefs, and write legal memorandums. Each legal intern will have an opportunity to work with all three branches of OCIG: the administrative and Civil Remedies Branch, the Industry Guidance Branch, and the Advice Branch. The Administrative and Civil Remedies Branch handles civil fraud and abuse cases involving Medicare, Medicaid, and other programs; works with the Department of Justice in the global resolution of civil False Claims Act cases; initiates administrative cases; and defends the decision to exclude providers from participating in Federal health care programs. The Industry Guidance Branch issues advisory opinions to the public and the health care industry on whether an activity constitutes grounds for sanction under the Anti-Kickback Statute, Civil Monetary Penalties Law, or other authorities, and provides legal advice to HHS and the Department of Justice on the Anti-Kickback Statute. The Advice Branch provides legal advice on issues such as the scope and exercise of OIG’s authorities and responsibilities; investigative techniques, procedures, and conduct; audits and inspections; and the impact of legislative proposals.

Applications accepted no later than September 16. For complete description and application instructions please click here.

Summer 2014 Legal Internship with the Center for Ocean Solutions

Center for Ocean SolutionsThe Center for Ocean Solutions (COS), a collaboration of Stanford University (through Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment and Hopkins Marine Station), the Monterey Bay Aquarium, and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, is seeking summer Legal Interns for ten-week positions starting in May or June 2014. The Center’s mission is to solve major problems facing the ocean and prepare the leaders who take on these challenges.

The Legal Intern will work primarily on research and writing projects within the Center’s ecosystem health, climate change, and land-sea interaction initiatives. Legal aspects of this work are likely to include environmental, public lands, administrative, and/or international law. Policy aspects of this work are likely to include monitoring and analysis of key state, federal, and international ocean governance and policy-making activities. Examples of recent Legal Intern projects include:

  • Researching the state of law of cumulative impact assessment under federal and state statutes;
  • Facilitating the use of science-based indicators and thresholds in management under existing statutory and regulatory frameworks;
  • Identifying policy and education opportunities to manage vectors of marine invasive species in California state waters;
  • Researching the impacts of relevant Executive Orders and their funding histories as points of comparison to the recently issued Executive Order on National Ocean Policy;
  • Reviewing U.S. state and local climate change adaptation strategies to inform coastal decision makers in the Monterey Bay area;
  • Assessing the interpretation of optimum yield in various natural resource areas to inform federal Fishery Management Council members’ thinking about optimum yield under the Magnuson-Stevens Act;
  • Reviewing state laws for opportunities to expand decision making through an ecosystem services lens;
  • Assessing implications for ocean and coastal management by examining successes and failures in the implementation of U.S. public lands management statutes; and
  • Identifying legal tools for addressing local causes of ocean acidification.

Applications accepted through October 15. For complete description and application instructions please click here.

Urban Justice Center in NYC Hiring Staff Attorneys for Veteran’s Advocacy Project

Urban Justice Center NYCThe Veteran Advocacy Project(VAP) at the Urban Justice Center seeks applicants for a Housing Staff Attorney. The position will focus on litigation and advocacy on behalf of low-income veterans in housing matters. The attorney will be responsible for providing direct legal assistance to veterans in the Supportive Services for Veterans Families program, including representation in Housing Court, at NYCHA hearings, and in advocacy involving HUD-VASH vouchers. In addition, the position will involve work with veterans on minor matters concerning consumer finance, child support, and government benefits. 2 + years of Housing Court litigation experience. Military experience or prior work with veterans is a plus.

They’re also seeking applicants for a Student Veterans Staff Attorney. The position will focus on litigation and advocacy on behalf of low-income veterans, with a focus on those transitioning from the military to civilian life in school.

The attorney will be responsible for providing direct legal assistance to veterans, primarily at higher education campuses around the New York metropolitan area, including representation in public benefits hearings, VA educational benefits claims, consumer finance, and child support. In addition, the position may involve work with veterans on Social Security claims and housing matters. Military experience or prior work with veterans is a plus, including knowledge of the Post-9/11 GI Bill.

Applications accepted through August 19. For complete info and application instructions please click here.

Spokane Volunteer Lawyer Program Seeking Program Coordinator

Spokane County BAThe Board of Trustees of the Spokane County Bar Association is accepting resumes for the full time position for coordinator of its Volunteer Lawyers Program.

Qualifications shall include: ability to work with people, managerial and accounting skills, grant writing experience, participation in The Alliance for Equal Justice network, ability to work under stress, experience working with volunteers is desirable. Prior family law experience helpful. The successful applicant will be able to manage all aspects of a small non-profit organization and work equally well with low-income clients in crisis, volunteer lawyers, and legal aid colleagues.

To apply: Please send cover letter and resume to: SCBA VLP Position, Spokane County Bar Association, 1116 West Broadway Avenue, MS ANX-4-SCBA, Spokane, WA 99260 or email: pyoude@spokanebar.org. Application deadline is August 14, 2013.

Marriage Equality After DOMA, WSBA Town Hall, Minority Bar Assn’s Happy Hour, Annual DV Symposium & Criminal Law Soirée

August 12: QLaw Event- Marriage Equality After DOMA

What Happened After Marriage Equality Arrived in Washington State from Alex Liberato on Vimeo.

QLaw Event: Marriage Equality After DOMA

Monday, August 12th, 2013
6:00 – 8:00 PM
Seattle University – Pigott Auditorium (Directions)
Click to Send RSVP Email, or RSVP on Facebook

Now that part of the so-called Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) has been overturned by the U.S. Supreme Court, what does it mean for you and your relationship? And what are the next steps to achieve the freedom to marry in every state in the country?

Join QLaw for a free community meeting that will help answer those questions. Panelists will provide information and answer questions on issues including federal taxes, employee benefits, family law, Social Security, military benefits, immigration, and what’s being done currently to make the freedom to marry a reality in all 50 states.

The discussion will be moderated by Lacey All, chair of Washington United for Marriage. Panelists include:

  • Howard Bye-Torre, Stoel Rives
  • Shelbi Day, Lambda Legal
  • Wendy Goffe, Stoel Rives
  • Janet Helson, Skellenger Bender, P.S.

To reserve your spot, please RSVP to events@aclu-wa.org or visit our event page on Facebook.

August 12: WSBA Governance Structure Town Hall

wsba2It’s not too late to make plans and join us either via webcast or in-person next Monday for a discussion about WSBA’s governance structure. Over the last six months, a task force has explored a number of questions, like:

  • Should  Board members be elected, appointed,or a combination of elected and appointed? If elected, should the present system be modified?
  • Should the WSBA Board include representation from non-lawyers?
  • How many members should comprise the board? How long should a board term be?  Should a Board member be able to run for more than one term? Should there be a cap on the number of terms a Board member could serve?
  • What is the Board’s primary role, and what should it focus on?
  • Should board candidates have certain experience or qualifications in order to serve on the board? If so, what are they?
  • Should there be a different approach to diversity appointments to the board?
  • What should the role of the president of the WSBA be, and how should the president be selected?

As key stakeholders, the Governance Task Force is seeking your input as it deliberates the types of questions posed above. By late fall, the Task Force will submit a proposal to the Washington State Supreme Court and the Board of Governors, and that report will incorporate feedback and comments provided by the WSBA membership.

Please join two members of the task force, both former WSBA Board of Governors members — Nancy Isserlis and Doug Lawrence — who will lead a Town Hall discussion around WSBA Governance, on Monday, Aug. 12, from noon to 1:30 p.m. at the WSBA Conference Center, located at 1501 4th Ave. #308, Seattle. Or join via webcast from your desktop.

What: Town Hall Discussion on WSBA Governance

When: Monday, Aug. 12, noon–1:30 p.m.

Where: WSBA Conference Center, 1501 4th Avenue, #308, Seattle (or attend via webcast)

To join via webcast, you must register in advance. Please register here. If you plan on attending in person, please let us know, although registration is not required.

August 21: Minority Bar Associations’ August Happy Hour

diversity handsPlease join the Latina/o Bar Association of Washington (LBAW), Washington Women Lawyers (WWL), GLBT Bar Association of Washington (QLaw), Loren Miller Bar Association (LMBA), Vietnamese-American Bar Association of Washington (VABAW), Korean American Bar Association of Washington (KABA), and the Asian Bar Association of Washington (ABAW) for an upcoming networking event. Light appetizers will be served with a no-host bar. Come network with your Minority Bar Association colleagues!  Please RSVP by Friday, August 16, 2013 to Nilly Park at npark@AlturaLaw.com.

Date: Wednesday, August 21, 2013, 5:30 – 7:30 PM

Location: Triple Door, Musicquarium Lounge

Address: 216 Union St., Seattle, WA 98101

September 12-13: 5th Annual Domestic Violence Symposium: “Reality DV”

cycle of violenceSeattle University – Pigott Building 901 12th Ave Seattle, WA 98122
Phone: (206) 398-4281, Email: parkerr@seattleu.edu
Printable directions to Seattle University, Campion Tower and the Murphy Garage are available by clicking here.  If you wish to use Google Maps, please use 914 E. Jefferson St., Seattle, WA 98122 as the address. Email Us

September 26: King County Washington Women Lawyers’ Annual Criminal Law Soirée

wwllogoPlease join us for KCWWL’s Annual Criminal Law Soirée on Thursday, September 26th from 5:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.  Wine and hors d’oeuvres will be provided, and there is no cost of admission.  The Soirée will be held at the Chinese Room at the historic Smith Tower, 506 2nd Ave #1021, Seattle, WA 98104.

We are delighted to welcome the Honorable Chief Judge Marsha J. Pechman, of the United States District Court for the Western District of Washington, as our keynote speaker. Topic:  the effects of sequestration on access to justice.

The purpose of the event is to highlight the work of KCWWL’s Criminal Law Section and to foster communication and collaboration among women lawyers.  We encourage criminal, civil, defense and plaintiffs’ attorneys to attend.

Please RSVP through Eventbrite to save your spot! http://www.eventbrite.com/event/7696024015.

Gender Justice in North Africa, Decriminalizing Homelessness & Combatting Source of Income Discrimination in Rental Housing

Underage Girls Are Egypt’s Summer Rentals

Underage-girls-IPS-571x472By Cam McGrath, Inter Press News Agency

El HAWAMDIA, Egypt , Aug 5 2013 (IPS) – Each summer, wealthy male tourists from Gulf Arab states flock to Egypt to escape the oppressive heat of the Arabian Peninsula, taking residence at upscale hotels and rented flats in Cairo and Alexandria. Many come with their families and housekeeping staff, spending their days by the pool, shopping, and frequenting cafes and nightclubs. Others come for a more sinister purpose.

In El Hawamdia, a poor agricultural town 20 kilometres south of Cairo, they are easy to spot. Arab men in crisp white thawbs troll the town’s pot-holed, garbage-strewn streets in their luxury cars and SUVs. As they arrive, Egyptian fixers in flip flops run alongside their vehicles, offering short-term flats and what to them is the town’s most sought-after commodity – underage girls.

Each year, in El Hawamdia and other impoverished rural communities across Egypt, thousands of girls between the ages of 11 and 18 are sold by their parents to wealthy, much older Gulf Arab men under the pretext of marriage. The sham nuptials may last from a couple of hours to years, depending on the negotiated arrangement.

“It’s a form of child prostitution in the guise of marriage,” Azza El-Ashmawy, director of the Child Anti-Trafficking Unit at the National Council for Childhood and Motherhood (NCCM) tells IPS. “The man pays a sum of money and will stay with the girl for a few days or the summer, or will take her back to his country for domestic work or prostitution.”

The girl is returned to her family when the marriage ends, usually to be married off again.

“Some girls have been married 60 times by the time they turn 18,” says El-Ashmawy. “Most ‘marriages’ last for just a couple of days or weeks.”

The deals are hatched in El Hawamdia’s myriad “marriage broker” offices, identifiable by the conspicuous presence of air-conditioners in a ramshackle town with intermittent power.

The brokers, usually second-rate lawyers, also offer a delivery service. Village girls as young as 11 are brought to the Arab tourists’ hotel or rented flat for selection. Arab men travelling with their wives and children often arrange a separate flat for such purposes.

The temporary marriages offer a way to circumvent Islamic restrictions on pre-marital sex. Continue reading here.

Moroccan Civil Society Organization Works to Implement Constitutional Gender-Parity Provisions

Morroccan Gender ParityIn May, Jossour Forum Des Femmes Marocaines, a Moroccan women’s rights organization and an ABA Rule of Law Initiative (ABA ROLI) partner, held a national colloquium in Rabat on the implementation of the 2011 constitution’s women’s rights-related provisions. Attended by 140 civil society representatives, parliamentarians, journalists, human rights lawyers and citizens, the event was organized to advance the constitution’s gender-parity provisions by educating the public and by advocating for women’s rights.

Read more about the colloquium here.

News from the National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty

National Law Center Homelessness & Poverty

Across the country, advocates, including homeless and formerly homeless people, are calling for legislation that protects the basic rights and dignity, and ensures equal access to opportunity regardless of housing status.

Last year, Rhode Island became the first state in the nation to enact an enforceable bill of rights, and the Law Center is proud to have worked with advocates there on that effort.  Since then, similar bills have become law in CT and IL, one is in the works in CA, and advocates in other states are contemplating similar initiatives. We are supporting these efforts and planning more support going forward.

These new laws aim to prevent discrimination based on housing status in the use of public space, as well as in employment, housing, voting.  These are key issues in communities across the country-and such discrimination serves as a barrier preventing their efforts to escape homelessness.  Fighting discriminatory policies with proactive, affirmative campaigns goes to the core of our mission to end and prevent homelessness.

We’re also working with the US Interagency Council on Homelessness, and the Department of Justice to build on the report published by the two agencies last year, Searching out Solutions, and to urge further steps by these and other federal agencies to implement its recommendations. Click here to continue reading. 

Landlord Discrimination Restricts the Use of Rental Vouchers

SOI-MAp_tm-01

Our latest report on housing discrimination found that some of the most blatant acts of discrimination against racial and ethnic minorities have declined over the last decade. However, minority renters and homeowners are still shown and told about fewer properties than similarly qualified whites. These forms of discrimination raise the costs of housing searches for minorities and restrict their choices.

Low-income minority renters face another form of discrimination when using Housing Choice Vouchers (HCV) to help pay for housing. The Housing Choice Voucher Program (HCVP) is the nation’s largest federal housing assistance program, providing more than 2.1 million low-income households with vouchers to subsidize their rent in the private market.  The Federal Fair Housing Act does not prohibit discrimination against renters based on vouchers or other sources of income (SOI).   Although ostensibly HCV facilitates mobility to better neighborhoods, because HCV program participants are not a protected class under the Fair Housing Act, landlords are free to reject their applications because of their voucher. This has the potential to limit housing choice. Continue reading here.

Exciting Internships & Externships Revealed

Attention Rising 2Ls! Native American Rights Fund Accepting Applications for Paid Summer 2014 Clerkships/Internships

narf_logoFounded in 1970, the Native American Rights Fund (NARF) is the oldest and largest nonprofit law firm dedicated to asserting and defending the rights of Indian tribes, organizations and individuals nationwide. NARF’s practice is concentrated in five key areas: the preservation of tribal existence; the protection of tribal natural resources; the promotion of Native American human rights; the accountability of governments to Native Americans; and the development of Indian law and educating the public about Indian rights, laws, and issues. 

NARF is currently seeking candidates for its Summer 2014 Clerkships. Each year, NARF conducts a nation-wide search for law students to participate in its Law Clerk Program. Positions are available in all three of NARF’s offices: Anchorage, AK; Boulder, CO; and Washington, D.C. Coursework in Native American Law required. Applicants must have completed their 2L year by Summer 2014. Clerks are paid $20/hour.

Requested Documents: Resume, Cover Letter, Unofficial Transcript, Writing Sample. Please include one letter of recommendation and references. To apply, please send your complete application packet to: Chrissy Johnson Dieck, Law Clerk Program Coordinator, Native American Rights Fund, 1506 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80302.

Please direct all questions to Chrissy Johnson Dieck at cjohnson@narf.org. Applications Accepted Until: November 1.

WA Attorney General’s Office’s Social & Health Services Division Seeking Fall Externs

WA AGO sealThe Washington State Attorney General’s Office’s Tacoma Division has an excellent and challenging opportunity for a qualified law student to earn academic credit by serving in its Social and Health Services Section during an upcoming semester or quarter. A large percentage of the work of the Tacoma Division involves juvenile litigation, which is done on behalf of the Children’s Services Administration of the Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS). The Tacoma Division attorneys also handle licensing actions relating to foster homes, as well as guardianships and adult family home and boarding home licensing actions for the Aging and Disability Services Administration of DSHS. The selected candidate would work as a part of a team of attorneys, paralegals, and other experts within the Division in investigating, filing and litigating cases during an upcoming academic quarter/semester.

Qualified applicants are individuals who excel academically as demonstrated by law school grades and class standing, and who demonstrate a high degree of competence based on prior experiences. The AGO seeks applicants who are committed to public service as demonstrated by an applicant’s background, talents, attitude, and enthusiasm for public law practice. We also seek applicants with a diverse background in education, previous work experience, law school activities, extracurricular activities, community service and areas of interest that enhance our office. Eligibility for WSBA Rule 9 status at the time of the service is strongly preferred.

In order to be considered for this externship position, candidates must submit a cover letter, AGO application form, esume, transcript and one letter of recommendation to Linda Nakamura at 800 Fifth Avenue, Suite 2000, Seattle, WA 98104. Please email your application materials to linda.nakamura@atg.wa.gov.

For information about this opportunity, please contact Section Chief and Senior Counsel Julian Bray at 253.597.4106 and JulianB@atg.wa.gov.

Applications Accepted Until: August 31.

National Housing Law Project Seeks Fall Interns

 NHLP

The National Housing Law Project seeks students for fall 2013 internships. Recent significant student work projects have included writing amicus curiae briefs; drafting testimony for Congressional hearings; submitting comments on proposed regulations; researching the impact of proposed housing legislation and regulations; drafting amendments to federal housing legislation; summarizing briefs in preparation for oral arguments; providing research assistance in drafting pleadings and motions; drafting portions of advocacy guides used by housing advocates across the country; and researching and writing articles for NHLP’s monthly Housing Law Bulletin.

Qualifications: Ideal candidates must possess high-caliber research and writing skills; demonstrate a commitment to working with low-income and underserved populations; and demonstrate an ability to work independently as well as a member of a team. Students will have an opportunity to develop a writing sample as part of their work. NHLP has sponsored several of its former interns for post-graduate fellowships, including Skadden and Equal Justice Works.

Salary: NHLP is happy to work with students who will be receiving credit, work study, or a stipend from their schools for their internship.

Application Instructions: To apply, please e-mail or mail a cover letter, resume, writing sample, and 3 references to: Deborah Thrope, Staff Attorney, National Housing Law Project, 703 Market Street, Suite 2000, San Francisco, CA 94103. dthrope@nhlp.org 415-546-7000 x. 3124

Applications accepted on a rolling basis through September 13.

HealthHIV in DC Announces Health Policy (Legal) Paid Internship for Fall, Spring & Summer

HealthHIVHealthHIV, a national, minority-based nonprofit advancing effective prevention, care and treatment for people at risk for, or living with, HIV or hepatitis, seeks law students for an internship in health policy.

Description HealthHIV’s health policy legal interns are highly motivated second and third-year law students who are interested in health equity and health policy as related to HIV and hepatitis prevention, care, and treatment.   Applicant should be enrolled in an ABA-accredited law school, and available to commit to at least 10 hours a week.

Key Functions Working with the Director of Prevention and Policy, the Health Policy Law Clerk will: • Contribute to analysis of health care policy that impacts HIV and hepatitis prevention, care, treatment, and health equity. • Research areas of health law, and write policy guidance on a wide range of health issues. • Monitor implementation of the Affordable Care Act, including the establishment of State Insurance Exchanges, expansion of Medicaid, development of essential health benefits, and impact of cost containment measures on people at risk for, or living with,   HIV or hepatitis.  • Develop best practice health policy papers for local advocates on topics impacting state health departments, community health centers, community-based organizations, and consumers. • Monitor federal and/or state legislation and regulations.  • Coordinate advocacy meetings and policy briefings with federal, state, and local legislators.

Necessary Skills and Abilities The successful applicant will: • Possess strong project management skills, • Balance multiple responsibilities, • Deliver quality customer service and work products, • Work effectively as part of a team with a diverse staff, • Possess a knowledge of HIV or hepatitis prevention, care, and treatment and/or health equity, and • Possess excellent oral and written communication skills.

To Apply  Submit curriculum vita/resume, brief cover letter defining your areas of interest, and a writing sample of a policy brief to jobs@healthhiv.org.

Coalition of Irish Immigration Centers Seeking National Coordinator for US

CIICThe Coalition of Irish Immigration Centers (CIIC) is a national umbrella group for all of the Irish Immigration Centers in the US, established in 1996 to promote the welfare of Irish immigrants in the US at a national level.

CIIC is seeking a Coordinator to administer the daily operations of the Coalition consistent with its mission and values.

The Coordinator’s primary responsibilities are to act as the main contact for the Coalition, promote the sharing of information and best practices among member centers, advance community outreach, coordinate annual and member meetings, and assist with strategic planning and fundraising as directed by the regionally diverse Board of Directors.

This administrative position is considered part-time at 20 hours per week with some flexibility required based on work volume and coordination of events, board meetings and trainings. Position location flexible within the US. Some travel within the US may be required.

Remuneration will be competitive relevant to the successful candidate’s experience and in keeping with current non-profit standards. A full job description can be obtained by emailing info@ciic-usa.org

Interested applicants are invited to submit a cover letter and resume to info@ciic-usa.org by close of business on Friday, August 23. Due to the anticipated high volume of applicants only qualified candidates will be contacted for interview.

Gender Odyssey Conference, Washington Attorney General Open House & 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington

WA AGO open house.

MLK 50

gender odyssey

Gender Odyssey is an international conference focused on the needs and interests of transgender and gender-nonconforming people. Packed with thought-provoking workshops, discussion groups, social events and entertainment, this one-of-a-kind annual gathering attracts people from all over the world for an uplifting weekend of skill sharing and community in Seattle, USA. Learn more about Gender Odyssey »

Happening Now! Gender Odyssey Conference 2013: August 1st – 4th

Last year’s 11th year anniversary conference was the most well-attended ever with over 25% increased attendance. Don’t miss out on our 2013 gathering!