Tagged: social justice

Looking for a Career in Public Service or Simply More Direct Client Work? Check Out These Announcements

Are You Primarily Interested in a Career in Public Service Law? Has it Been a While Since you Last Met with Your Public Service Career Coach?

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Whether you’ve got summer plans lined up or not, now’s a great time to reconnect with your public service career coach. We can help you strategize and discuss internships, externships, fellowships, pro bono, clinics, post grad planning and beyond, not to mention interview and networking tips. Not sure who you should be meeting with? 1Ls and 2Ls should contact Assistant Director Aline Carton-Listfjeld or schedule directly in Symplicity. 3Ls should contact Assistant Dean Michele Storms.

Youth Opportunities Act Opens Doors to Thousands of Young Adults across Washington State

By Columbia Legal Services

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Photo courtesy of Abdullah üsame Deniz and StockVault.

OLYMPIA – Governor Jay Inslee plans to sign the Youth Opportunities Act (HB 1651) into law tomorrow, after years of negotiations resulted in overwhelming, bipartisan support for the bill from the Washington State Legislature. The Act will result in the sealing of 6,000-10,000 young adults’ juvenile offense records each year, allowing them to receive greater opportunities in housing, education, and employment. Championed by Rep. Ruth Kagi (D-32), and negotiated by Sen. Jeannie Darneille (D-27) and Sen. Steve O’Ban (R-32), the bill received near unanimous support in the Legislature.

“The Youth Opportunities Act eliminates a major barrier for many rehabilitated youth who can now contribute fully to their communities,” said Casey Trupin, Attorney with the Children & Youth project at Columbia Legal Services (CLS). “By supporting one of the biggest juvenile justice reforms in decades, the Legislature has offered a path for young adults to pursue education, employment, and housing.” For four years, CLS has worked closely with partners such as Friends of YouthFaith Action NetworkMockingbird SocietyChildren’s Alliance, and many other strong advocates to ensure this bill passed.

Continue reading here.

Looking for a Chance to Work with Clients?  The Moderate Means Program is Recruiting Interns for Spring and Summer Quarters, Applications Due 4/11

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Photo courtesy of StockVault.

The Statewide Moderate Means Program (MMP) is a joint venture between the Washington State Bar Association and the Washington State law schools. The goal of the program is to increase access to civil legal services by people of moderate means who cannot afford an attorney but make too much money to qualify for traditional legal aid services. The program is focused on the areas of Family, Housing and Consumer law.

Law students serving as MMP volunteer interns will interview potential clients by telephone to collect information and evaluate their cases. Qualifying cases will be referred by the MMP interns to participating attorneys who have agreed to represent Moderate Means Program clients for a reduced fee. MMP interns will be expected to commit to a minimum of five hours a week for the duration of spring quarter and this summer (one hour is a weekly staff meeting).

Click here for more information.

America’s Growing Inequality: The Impact of Poverty and Race Publication Explores Poverty & Race

Americas Growing Inequality Impact Poverty Cover

America’s Growing Inequality: The Impact of Poverty and Race, edited by Chester Hartman is now available in hardcover – includes the best articles and essays from Poverty & Race; with a foreword by Congressman Luis Gutierrez. The book is a compilation of the best and still-most-relevant articles published in Poverty & Race, the bimonthly of The Poverty & Race Research Action Council from 2006 to the present. Authors are some of the leading figures in a range of activities around these themes. It is the fourth such book PRRAC has published over the years, each with a high-visibility foreword writer: Rep. John Lewis, Rep. Jesse Jackson, Jr. Bill Bradley, Julian Bond in previous books, Rep. Luis Gutierrez of Chicago for this book. The
chapters are organized into four sections: Race & Poverty: The Structural Underpinnings; Deconstructing Poverty and Racial Inequities; Re(emerging) Issues; Civil Rights History.

Order here at the PRRAC discounted rate; see the Table of Contents here.

Missed the Recent SJT on Public Interest Post Grad Fellowships? Don’t Fret. We’ve got all of the info right here!

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Download our presentation slides here and watch the podcast here. You’ll find all of the essentials on the nuts and bolts of organizational and project based public interest post grad fellowships, how to find them and some strategies for successful applications.

Kirwan Institute Releases Second State of the Science: Implicit Bias Review 2014

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With the results in the Zimmerman and Dunn trials, introducing people to Implicit Bias research seems more important than ever. The Kirwan Institute is excited to be able to continue to support the field with this new edition of State of the Science: Implicit Bias Review. Chapter 1 serves as a primer to introduce the topic, capturing some of the key ideas that were discussed at length in the 2013 edition. The next two chapters focus on the newest scholarly literature from 2013 (Chapter 2 reviews many of these recent publications, and Chapter 3 takes a step back to reflect on some of the larger trends occurring in the field). Chapters 4 and 5 delve into the concept of implicit racial bias as it operates within particular domains, specifically employment and housing (building on the sectors discussed in last year’s edition: Education, Health and Criminal Justice). The publication closes with materials in the appendices that we thought might be useful to those who are seeking to educate others regarding implicit racial bias, including “A Conversation with an Implicit Bias Skeptic.”

Click here to download the report.

Hunger Strikers Released from Solitary Confinement at the Northwest Detention Center

Activists rally outside the ICE Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma, Washington on March 11, 2014

Photo of activists rallying outside the ICE Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma, Washington on March 11, 2014, courtesy of Reuters and Jason Redmond.

By Columbia Legal Services & American Civil Liberties Union

Federal immigration authorities have released hunger strikers from solitary confinement at the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma, Washington. The action came after the ACLU of Washington (ACLU-WA) and Columbia Legal Services (CLS) filed a lawsuit seeking a court order to prohibit U.S. Immigration and Enforcement (ICE) from retaliating against detainees who engage in First Amendment-protected activities by placing them in solitary confinement.

“Our clients are very grateful to be out of solitary confinement after 6 days in it. This is a victory for free speech and fair treatment,” said Melissa Lee, Attorney and Institutions Project Coordinator with CLS.

“We’re very pleased that ICE has stopped retaliating against detainees engaged in peaceful protest. Punishing hunger strikers by putting them in isolation cells was an unlawful attempt to chill free speech rights” said ACLU-WA Legal Director Sarah Dunne.

Continue reading here.

Mediation Training from a Social Justice Perspective Conducted by the Social Justice Mediation Institute, May 19-23

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Hosted by the City of Seattle Alternative Dispute Resolution Program.

$450 if registration completed before April 15.  $500 after April 15.  Some fee reductions available.

35.0 CLEs (5.0 ethics) approved.  (There will be a charge of $25 for members of the Washington State Bar Association asking for CLEs.)

For application and more information, please send an e-mail to Vivien.sharples@seattle.gov

This institute prepares trainees to mediate while applying a social justice lens to their own techniques.  We explore how mediation can routinely replicate inequalities despite our intensions to the contrary.  Trainees gain strategies to address these challenges while still facilitating a process with self-determination about the outcome for the disputing parties.   Concepts from narrative theory are applied to equip mediators with additional tools for effectively understanding the dispute and building agreements.

For more information about the training, click here.

Equal Justice Works, Skadden, Echoing Green, AmeriCorps… Oh My! Navigating Public Interest Fellowships

March 31: Global Mondays: Truth, Justice and Reparation in Northern Ireland

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Monday, Mar. 31, 2014
12:30-1:20 PM, Gates Hall RM 117 (unless noted)

Hosted by UW Law Graduate Program in Sustainable International Development and the PhD Program, and the Comparative Law & Society Studies (CLASS) Center

“Dealing with the Past: Narrating Truth in Northern Ireland”

Dr. Kathleen Cavanaugh, Irish Center for Human Rights, National University of Ireland

In truth telling processes in transitional societies, such as Northern Ireland, mechanisms established to find the truth, such as truth commissions, endeavour to find a common narrative emerging about the causes of conflict. At the same time, there is now evidence that such processes also create silences; some narratives are not fully represented. This lecture will provide some background on the conflict in Northern Ireland and how such a meta-conflict situation has given rise to conflicts over memories of state.

Image courtesy of Stockvault and Nicolas Raymond.

April 1: Social Justice Tuesday: Public Interest Post Graduate Fellowships

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Tuesday, Apr. 1, 2014
12:30-1:20 PM, RM 133

Speaker: Aline Carton-Listfjeld, Center for Public Service Law

Equal Justice Works, Skadden, Echoing Green, AmeriCorps…Oh my!

Trying to make sense of the all the fellowships out there? Get vital resources and learn about the different types of fellowships for recent law grads with experience and passion for social justice and public interest law. 1Ls and 2Ls are strongly encouraged to attend.

If you would like lunch please RSVP via Symplicity or Email by 12:00 pm Monday, March 31.

April 2-3: Clinics Information Fair

2014 Clinic Info Week Schedule

April 7: Global Mondays, LGBT Rights Internationally: Russia, India, Uganda, Nigeria and Beyond

Monday, Apr. 7, 2014
12:30 – 1:20 PM, RM 127
Speakers from the International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission:

Jessica Stern

Jessica Stern is the Executive Director of the International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission. As the first researcher on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) human rights at Human Rights Watch, she conducted fact-finding investigations and advocacy around sexual orientation and gender identity in countries including Iran, Kyrgyzstan, South Africa, and the United Arab Emirates. She holds a masters degree in human rights from the London School of Economics. She is frequently quoted in the Mail & Guardian, Al Jazeera English, the Associated Press, Reuters, Agence France Presse, Deutsche Welle, Voice of America, The Guardian and The BBC.

Grace Poore

Grace Poore, from Malaysia, has been the Regional Program Coordinator for Asia and the Pacific Islands at the International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission (IGLHRC) since 2007.  She develops the work in Asia, oversees multi-country projects on human rights documentation and advocacy in Asia, and conducts trainings.  She co-wrote the video “Courage Unfolds” about LGBT activism in Asia and the Yogyakarta Principles.  Ms. Poore holds a Masters degree from Syracuse University, Newhouse School of Communications.  She is currently working on a report about violence against lesbians, bisexual women, and transgender people in five Asian countries.

May 5: Gates Public Service Law Speaker Series: Professor Thomas Buergenthal Speaking on “Becoming an International Judge via the Holocaust”

Thomas Buergenthal

Monday, May 5, 2014
4:30 – 5:30 PM, RM 133
Reception to follow at the Burke Museum

Thomas Buergenthal is the Lobingier Professor of Comparative Law and Jurisprudence at George Washington University. He came to the United States at the age of 17. He spent the first 11 years of his life in various German camps and is one of the youngest survivors of the Auschwitz and Sachsenhausen concentration camps. Considered one of the world’s leading international human rights experts, Professor Buergenthal was a Judge and President of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights as well as President of the Administrative Tribunal of the Inter-American Development. He was a member of the UN Human Rights Committee and UN Truth Commission for El Salvador. He is a member of the Ethics  Commission of the International Olympic Committee and the honorary president of the Inter-American Institute of Human Rights in San José.

Co-Sponsors: The Jackson School, the UW Center for Human Rights, Hillel, and the  Jewish Studies Department. 

Reception Sponsored by the Gates Public Service Law Program and the UW Center for Human Rights. (Sponsorship of this event by the University of Washington School of Law and the W.H. Gates Public Service law Program does not imply endorsement.)

RSVP via Symplicity or email.

Celebrating International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination

March 21: Today is International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination

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March 21, 2014– By USHRN. Photo courtesy all-images.org.

Today as we celebrate the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, we share Dr. Carol Anderson’s keynote address to the USHRN 2013 Biannual National Conference.

Dr. Anderson argues that the Civil Rights Movement “did not have the frame in order to deal with the depth of degradation that had happened from centuries of slavery and Jim Crow. And so as one victory after another led to greater exposure of the human rights remains in the black community, it became clear that the root of systemic inequalities remained even after all of the blood, all of the struggle, and all of the martyrs.”

A staunch advocate for human rights, in her seminal work, Eyes Off the Prize, Dr. Anderson reminds us that the struggle for human rights – the struggle for adequate healthcare, education, housing, decent work and our civil and political rights – is the path to ending racial discrimination in the U.S.

As we prepare for the review of the U.S. Government record to end racial discrimination in all of its forms by the UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD) in August of this year, we are reminded of the work ahead to ensure that the Obama administration adopts a National Plan of Action for Racial Justice. A National Plan of Action would address persistent contemporary forms of racial discrimination and race disparities in almost every sphere of life in the U.S. Click here for more information on why we need the National Plan of Action. Click here to access the US Human Rights Network’s Template for a National Plan of Action to learn how activists and advocates can provide input into developing a National Plan of Action.

On the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination join us in our fight to end racial discrimination in the U.S. If you are interesting in learning more about the upcoming work on CERD, please join the ICERD Listserve.

Job Positions in Civil Rights, Juvenile Justice, Human Rights and More

RESULTS Accepting Applications for Real Change Fellow, Due 3/21

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RESULTS is taking applications for our REAL Change fellowship, which includes a scholarship that covers almost the entire costs of coming to our conference this summer along with training and support throughout the year. More on the program:

As A REAL Change Fellow You Will:

  • Receive training and support over 12 months to become a powerful advocate for the end of poverty.
  • Learn how to lobby your member of Congress on everything from tax policies that can lift millions of low-income Americans out of poverty to global health initiatives like GAVI (Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunizations).
  • Become a skilled organizer who mobilizes your community to fight poverty.
  • Attend the RESULTS International Conference (IC) featuring speakers like World Bank President Dr. Jim Kim.
  • Write pieces that get published in the media.
  • Start your own RESULTS chapter or help a local RESULTS chapter grow and thrive.

For a full description and application details, click here.

Call for Applications for the Immigrant and Refugee Commission, Due 3/21

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The City of Seattle is opening up the application process for new commissioners to serve on the Immigrant and Refugee Commission. The Office of Immigrant and Refugee Affairs was created in January 2012 and this commission is one of the many important ways in which the City ensures that they are actively engaging and working with  immigrant and refugee communities.

With the unprecedented growth in the foreign-born population since the 1980s, Seattle has become an increasingly multi-cultural city, rich with diversity. In keeping with the Race and Social Justice Initiative, Mayor Edward B. Murray and the Seattle City Council want to ensure that city government provides high-quality customer service to all, including immigrants and refugees living and working in Seattle, and that residents are engaged in all aspects of Seattle’s civic, economic and cultural life. To this end, the Immigrant and Refugee Commission was created in 2008.

For more information and application details, click here.

Landesa Seeking Graduate Legal Intern, Due 3/21

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he Landesa Internship Program is part of Landesa’s broader efforts to incrase the number of professionals who work on and/or have an understanding of land rights, whether in the land right field specifically, the wider development community, the government sector, or elsewhere. Graduate Legal Interns will have the opportunity to increase their understanding of Landesa’s strategies and methodologies by attending project and staff meetings. They will also take part in periodic Q&A sessions with Landesa’s land tenure experts who can speak to land rights issues, specific projects, and careers in the international development field. Upon completing this internship at Landesa, Graduate Legal Interns will be invited to join an alumni network comprised of previous interns and fellows.

The Graduate Legal Intern conducts research and supports the research efforts of others on a variety of topics relevant to Landesa’s work. Past Graduate Legal intern assisgnments include: compiling case studies of large-scale corporate land acquisitions; identifying and analyzing the particular effects of climate change on women’s land rights; conducting a legal review of Rwandan land laws; helping to write a concept note (a Landesa project design tool) for a project proposing to use mobile technology in Kenya; and identify and analyzing Myanmar’s resettlement practices and laws on takings and compensation.

The Graduate Legal intern will be supervised by a land rights attorney and will work with Landesa program staff requesting research including Program Directors and project leads.

For more information and application details, click here.

Attention Recent Grads & Post Grads! Department of Education Office of Civil Rights Seeking General Attorney, Due 3/24

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The Department of Education Office of Civil Rights is seeking a full time attorney at entry level and experienced level positions.  As the General Attorney, you will have the responsibility for participating on a civil rights compliance and enforcement team that supports the mission of the Department of Education and the Office for Civil Rights’ (OCR) Strategic Plan. This position is located in a regional civil rights office. OCR operates under the jurisdiction of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, and their implementing regulations.

For a full description and application details, click here.

National Juvenile Justice Network’s Leadership Institute Offers Fellowship for Juvenile Justice Advocates, Due 4/7

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Picture somebody in your mind — someone you know — who wants to set the juvenile justice world on fire.  Someone who’s fed up with seeing kids get kicked out of school for minor misbehavior, locked up without due process, or any of a hundred other unjust, unfair things that can blight young people’s lives.

Chances are this army-of-one you’re picturing in your mind is ready to apply to the Youth Justice Leadership Institute, a robust, year-long fellowship program run by the National Juvenile Justice Network that focuses on cultivating and supporting professionals of color. Our goal is to create the foundation for a more effective juvenile justice reform movement by developing a strong base of advocates and organizers who reflect the communities most affected by juvenile justice system practices and policies.

Applications are due April 7, 2014.

For more information, click here.  Click here to download the application packet.

The Opportunity Agenda Seeking Summer 2014 Law and Advocacy Intern, Due 4/21

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The Opportunity Agenda is a non-partisan public interest organization that promotes opportunity and human rights in the United States, bringing together legal and policy advocacy, social science research, and communications strategies.  Our mission is to build the national will to expand opportunity in America.  The Opportunity Agenda focuses on issues that incorporate racial justice, women’s rights, immigrant rights and economic justice for all.

The Opportunity Agenda is seeking candidates with a demonstrated commitment to social justice and equal opportunity, strong research and writing skills, and the initiative to take on new and innovative assignments. A sense of humor and a dose of modesty are essential.

Law students will assist in legal research and writing to support The Opportunity Agenda’s Law and Advocacy work.  This summer, the focus would be on immigration policy, racial justice, human rights, and economic opportunity.  Past research topics have included the application of international human rights laws to state constitutional and statutory jurisprudence, analysis of, and advocacy around, existing state and federal policies to promote equality across race, gender, income, and other characteristics; new approaches to addressing subconscious and structural bias in the law; and promising policies for promoting immigrant rights and economic opportunity.  The work will be supervised by The Opportunity Agenda’s Robert L. Carter Fellow and Director of Law and Advocacy.

For complete details and application information, click here.

OBMICA Seeking Summer Intern to Work in Dominican Republic, Spanish Fluency Required

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OBMICA, a forward-looking think tank based in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, is seeking a summer legal intern to assist in ongoing research and monitoring of human rights of migrants and their descendants in the DR. Potential projects in which the intern would participate include gender needs in the deportation process, monitoring the implementation of the national regularization plan for migrants, or others.   The intern’s work will focus on identifying the legal issues and their social implications, paying attention to human rights violations under regional and national, and international jurisprudence.

The experience will most likely involve client interaction and fact gathering with persons directly affected, as well as a heavy legal writing component, working in conjunction with OBMICA and other organizations on the ground.  The goal of the internship is to draft a legal memo that may be made public through OBMICA and their national and international partners.  A full work program will be drawn up by mutual agreement upon commencement of the internship.

For complete information and application details, visit Symplicity.  For more information on OBMICA, visit their website here.

Two Summer Clerk Positions Still Available at Public Counsel in Los Angeles, CA

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Adoptions Project

The Adoptions Project provides free legal representation to foster parents who are adopting children out of foster care, and also advocates for additional services and benefits for the children being adopted. The Adoptions Project has an available position for a summer law clerk. Summer interns generally have the opportunity to: (1) acquire practical skills working with professionals from different fields; (2) conduct client interviews and help to identify gaps in clients’ services or benefits; (3) work on an adoption case from start to finish under the supervision of an attorney; and (4) conduct legal research applicable to the Project.

Date Needed: May 27, 2014 – August 1, 2014, but looking to interview candidates as soon as possible

Community Development Project

Public Counsel’s Community Development Project (CDP) strives to build healthy, inclusive, economically stable communities through the delivery of pro bono legal services to community-based nonprofits and small businesses in Los Angeles County. CDP provides transactional legal services to nonprofits that assist lower income people and neighborhoods and to entrepreneurs located in, and employing residents of, low income neighborhoods. CDP also advances community driven planning, development and litigation strategies to promote affordable housing and equitable development, create jobs and encourage child care facilities. Our clients include neighborhood based community development corporations, housing advocacy and organizing groups and coalitions, health care clinics, small businesses and child care providers serving areas in need in Los Angeles, including Boyle Heights, South LA, Pico Union, Wilmington, San Gabriel Valley and Skid Row.

Public Counsel’s Community Development Project has an available position for a summer law clerk. The bulk of the work will involve legal research, policy analysis, writing memos, and reviewing planning documents regarding extremely low-income communities of color in Los Angeles and all over the U.S. The clerk’s work will include efforts to understand, investigate, and engage processes and policies around transit-oriented development which may result in the displacement of low-income communities. The clerk may also help support CDP’s transactional and litigation programs to advance affordable housing, child care and job creation strategies.

Date Needed: May 27, 2014 – August 1, 2014, but looking to interview candidates as soon as possible

For complete information and application details, here.

Support Students in Public Service, Job Fairs & More!

January 28: Social Justice Tuesday -Voting Rights After the Shelby County Decision: New Challenges for Voting Equality Today

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Room 133
Date: Tuesday, 1/28/2014
Time: 12:30 – 1:20 pm
Speaker: Matt Barreto, Associate Professor, Political Science

Please RSVP by Monday, January 27, 2014 at 12:00 pm Symplicity or gatespsl@uw.edu.

January 29: You’re Invited to the Attorney General’s Info Session

WA AGO seal William H. Gates Hall, UW School of Law
Room 119
Date: Wednesday, 1/29/2014
Time: 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM

Jessica Creighton and Lisa Keeler from the Attorney General’s Office will be here to discuss the opportunities within their offices both during and after law school. Bring your questions and your lunch for an informative presentation. Please RSVP in Symplicity.

January 31: Don’t Miss the NW Public Service Career Fair! 1/31 in Seattle, 2/1 in Portland

NW PS Career Fair logoDon’t forget to register for the NW Public Service Career Fair this Friday, 1/31 in Seattle, and Saturday on 2/1.  For over two decades, the NW Public Service Career Fair has linked law students & alumni with opportunities to make a difference.  More than 75 non-profits & government offices and more than 600 students & alumni from our 11 schools participated in 2013.  Click here to view a sample list of participating employers.

Register at the door or online here.

Check out these table talk tips here and these career fair interviewing tips here.

February 1: Support Students’ Commitment to Public Service!  Donate to PILA

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Whether you can make to this year’s PILA Auction on Saturday, February 1 or not, now’s a great time to make a special donation to ensure the sustainability of its summer grant program for law students working in public service!

When you give this year, remember two things:  (1) this year, your gift will have “triple effect” because of the Dean’s match and will support a permanent—rather than a single year—grant (with the dean’s match, the faculty/staff has already funded three grants for this summer!); (2) because of rising tuitions costs, a difficult legal job market, and dwindling budgets for legal aid and public defense, there has never been a time of greater need.
To learn more about PILA and make a donation online, please click here

February 6: The Sustainable International Development LLM Program Celebrates 20 Years

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Striving for a World of Shared Prosperity

Please join us for a celebration to commemorate the 20th Anniversary of the Sustainable International Development Graduate Program at UW School of Law.

Date: Thursday, February 6, 2014

WILLIAM GATES HALL, UW SCHOOL OF LAW
Reception: 4:30pm
Formal Program: 6:00pm

The SID graduate program builds upon the groundbreaking work of founder Roy Prosterman who pioneered land reform as a means to secure prosperity for the rural poor.  His legacy is an innovative graduate program designed to provide students with the skills needed to face the international development challenges of the 21st century. The SID 20th Anniversary celebration commemorates the past and celebrates the future.

Remarks by: Roy Prosterman, Founder, Landesa and the Sustainable International Development graduate program; Jeffrey Riedinger ‘80, Vice Provost for Global Affairs, University of Washington; Tim Hanstad ‘88, ‘95, President and CEO, Landesa; Yoichi Shio, SID LL.M. ‘04, Director, Law and Justice Division, Governance Group; Anita Ramasastry, UW Law Foundation Professor of Law and Director, Sustainable International Development graduate program.

RSVP Here.

February 21: Join the Social Reception Featuring Members of the Washington Supreme Court at the 28th Goldmark Award Luncheon

Logo for the Legal Foundation of Washington

Date: Friday, February 21, 2014
Time: 12:00 – 1:30 PM
Location: Seattle Sheraton Hotel, 1400 6th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98101

Followed by the ATJ Forum Celebration of Leadership which includes a panel featuring members of the Washington Supreme Court plus a social reception to bestow the Rainier Cup! https://2014atjforum.eventbrite.com

Register here.

Positions in Public Defense, South African Constitutional Court and More!

Attention 3Ls and Recent Grads! Constitutional Court of South Africa Seeking Foreign Law Clerks

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The Justices of the Constitutional Court of South Africa are pleased to invite applications from outstanding recent law graduates and young lawyers interested in serving as foreign law clerks. Candidates may be appointed to start as soon as 1 July 2014.

Background: South Africa continues to be regarded as one of the most intriguing and compelling examples of constitutionalism in the transition to democracy. Its Constitution is viewed as one of the world’s most progressive founding charters.

The Constitutional Court, the country’s highest court, is the guardian of that promise. It has, in a range of ground-breaking decisions, given content to the Constitution’s guarantees by, for instance, ruling the death penalty unconstitutional; upholding full equality for gay and lesbian people; declaring that resident non-citizens are entitled to social benefits; and ordering the government to make anti-retroviral treatment available to pregnant mothers living with HIV/AIDS.

About the Position of a Foreign Law Clerk: Each year, six to ten young lawyers from around the world serve as foreign law clerks to the Constitutional Court. Working alongside two South African law clerks, foreign law clerks assist a specific judge in performing his or her duties.

The responsibilities of foreign law clerks are essentially the same as those of their South African counterparts and similar to judicial clerks elsewhere in the common law world. These include extensive legal research and writing, as well as the formulation, drafting, and editing of judgments. The Court itself is highly collaborative, allowing for substantial engagement among clerks from all Chambers.

Foreign clerks are generally appointed to serve one six-month term. Some may, however, serve for longer and sometimes in more than one Chambers.

Foreign law clerks are not remunerated by the Court. So, it is essential that they seek their own funding to cover their expenses, including food, accommodation, travel to South Africa, visas and travel to and from work.

For complete description and application instructions please click here.

Snohomish County Public Defender Association Seeking 1L & 2L Summer Interns/Externs

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The Snohomish County Public Defenders Association is seeking  2L Summer interns for  2014 Rule 9 positions and 1L Summer interns for legal research positions.  The Snohomish County Public Defenders Association represents indigent individuals in the Superior and District Courts of Snohomish County.  Currently the office has a Felony unit, Misdemeanor unit, Civil Commitment unit, and a Predator unit.

Rule 9 Positions: The Rule 9 positions will be in the Misdemeanor unit at the office.  Each intern will be paired up with a supervising attorney who will assign tasks as needed. After an initial training period, which will last approximately two weeks, the position will require frequent court appearances, meeting with clients, possible interviews at various correctional facilitates, motions practice, and any other task assigned by a supervising attorney.  The position will likely require a significant amount of time in court.  Only those interested in working with indigent people and who are interested in trial work should apply.  Positions are unpaid.  Externship credit is possible but will require the student to coordinate with the school.

Legal Research Positions: Generally the interns will be responsible for conducting research and writing projects as assigned by a supervising attorney with specific projects coming from any of the above units.  Additionally other projects may be assigned as needed and depending on the interns’ interest.

The 1L interns will go through a portion of the training that the 2L Rule 9 interns will go through.  After that training period the interns will generally be assigned research and writing projects.  These projects will come from, at least historically, all units within the office.

For complete descriptions and application instructions please visit Symplicity. Applications accepted through February 7th, 2014.  

Yakima County Department of Assigned Counsel Seeking Entry-Level Public Defender

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There is one opening for an attorney with Yakima County Department of Assigned Counsel.   Assignment and duties will depend on experience and the needs of the Department and are subject to change. Initial assignment will be in the Juvenile  Court for representation of juveniles in offender proceedings and juveniles in ‘Becca’ proceedings .   Applicants who have at least two years of prior experience and otherwise qualify for a position may be hired in either the Attorney I or Attorney II classification.  The hiring salary range for the Attorney I classification $51,074 – $59,764 per year and the hiring range for the  Attorney II classification is $63,460 to $74,744 per year.  This position is “at will” and serves at the pleasure of the Director of the Department of Assigned Counsel.

Essential Functions: Attorney I positions are given assignments and cases at the entry to moderate level of complexity and seriousness.  Functions listed below are a representative sample.

Criminal Matters:  Provides legal advice and representation for accused at in-custody arraignment proceedings.  Responds to individuals arrested who wish to consult with an attorney at critical stages of proceedings, which may involve on-call rotation work. Interviews and confers with clients regarding facts, plea discussions, trial, sentencing and progress of case. Evaluates each case assessing its factual and legal sufficiency under the law at each stage of a criminal proceeding by reviewing police and other reports and analyzing all information available. Evaluates strengths, weaknesses and facts of each case for purposes of additional investigation, plea negotiations, development of case strategy and trial preparation. Coordinates or conduct case investigation for trial preparation as necessary.  Arranges for tests of physical evidence, testimony of expert witnesses and interview or direct interviews of witnesses as required. Instigates or responds to plea bargaining negotiations with opposing counsel and represent the interest of the client. Represents clients at preliminary appearances, arraignments, pre-trial motions, pleas of guilty, sentencing hearings and post-trial matters such as restitution hearings and sentence reviews/amendments.  Conducts all trial actions, including: selection of jury, opening arguments, direct and cross examination, introduction of evidence and exhibits, preparation of jury instructions, closing arguments and post trial motions.

Civil Matters:  Represents clients at all stages of civil commitment proceedings, Involuntary Treatment Act hearings (mental), child support proceedings, paternity proceedings, contempt proceedings, child dependency proceeding, truancy  and other ‘Becca’ proceedings, and drug forfeiture proceedings. Performs case evaluation, additional investigation, trial preparation, settlement negotiations, pre-trial motions, trials and appeals as required. Performs other job-related duties as required.

Applications accepted though January 23. For complete description and application instructions please click here

U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Majority Oversight & Investigations Office Seeking Spring Externs (Unpaid Law Clerks)

US Senate

The U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Majority Oversight & Investigations Office is seeking unpaid Law Clerks for spring 2014. The position offers law students or recent graduates the opportunity to gain substantive experience while participating in the legislative process. Law Clerks will assist Committee staff in conducting document review, policy and legal research, drafting memoranda, contributing to reports and preparing for hearings.

Qualifications: Applicants must be current law students or recent graduates. Applicants must also demonstrate outstanding research abilities, work well in a fast-paced environment and possess excellent written and oral communication skills. Previous experience in government is not required, but candidates should have a general understanding of the legislative process. Applicants available full-time through the spring are preferred, though candidates available part-time may also be considered.

Applications: Interested applicants should apply for this position by emailing a cover letter, resume, writing sample and availability to alyssa_mowitz@help.senate.gov with “Law Clerks” in the subject line as soon as possible. Applications will be accepted until the positions have been filled. The office is an equal opportunity employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, gender identity or sexual orientation.

Asian American Legal Defense & Education Fund Now Accepting Applications for Summer Intern Program

AALDEF

Founded in 1974, the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund (AALDEF) is a national organization that protects and promotes the civil rights of Asian Americans. By combining litigation, advocacy, education, and organizing, AALDEF works with Asian American communities across the country to secure human rights for all.

Internships for the summer of 2014 are available in the following program areas: Anti-Trafficking, Community Health Care Initiative, Economic Justice for Workers, Educational Equity, Housing Justice Project, Immigrant Access to Justice, Voting Rights

Description of Summer Internship Program:  The summer program is ten weeks, from approximately June 2 through August 8Interns work full-time and are supervised by attorneys in specific program areas.  Depending on the program area, interns will work on litigation, legal and policy advocacy, community outreach and education, or client intakes; each program area differs in emphasis.  Summer interns attend weekly brown bag lectures on a range of public interest legal topics along with interns from other legal defense funds and civil rights groups.  The position is unpaid.  However, in previous years many AALDEF interns have been successful at securing independent funding.  Academic credit can be arranged.

For complete description and application information please click here. Applications will be reviewed through January 31.

The CPSL is Hiring! Want an Interview at the NW Public Service Career Fair? Don’t Delay- Monday, January 13 is the App Deadline

Monday, January 13: Application Deadline to Interview at the NW Public Service Career Fair!

NW PS Career Fair logoFor over two decades, the NW Public Service Career Fair has linked law students and alumni with opportunities to make a difference.  More than 75 non-profits and government offices and more than 600 students and alumni from our 11 schools participated in 2013.

Check out the list of employers participating at the Seattle fair on Friday, January 31. Check out the list of employers participating at the Portland fair on Saturday, February 1. Learn more about the application and interview process here.

The Center for Public Service Law is Hiring! Seeking a Communications Assistant- Work Study Position

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About the CPSL: The Center for Public Service Law at UW Law aims to educate, empower and inspire all of our students, graduates and broader law school community to incorporate public service into their lives, regardless of where they work or what kind of position they hold.

The Center works to nurture the culture of a service-oriented legal education, career and community as a key component of the UW Law mission to be Leaders for the Global Common Good. To that end, we provide programming, opportunities and connections to help UW Law students and graduates realize this vision of generous public service.

Position Overview: The Center for Public Service Law at the UW School of Law is the hub of public interest and social justice activities and career support at the law school. The communications assistant will provide support to the CPSL with its online outreach and marketing primarily through its blog (commongooduw.org) and weekly online newsletter. The blog provides the latest local, national and international news, announcements, events, job and internships postings related to public service law. It is updated three times per week. The weekly newsletter recaps the last week’s blog postings and directs its over 350 recipients to the blog.

For complete job description and application instructions please click here. For more information about federal work study at UW please click here.

Act fast! Applications reviewed on a rolling basis. Position open until filled.

Applications for Human Rights Institute Now Accepted

Human Rights Institute at the Urban Justice Center will be held from April 2- 4, 2014 in New York City.

The Institute is a three-day professional development conference that brings select human rights advocates and policymakers from across the country to network, share ideas, and collaborate with others who are working to advance domestic human rights. Participants will be able to learn about the international human rights framework, apply it to their local organizing efforts and become contributors to the growing domestic human rights movement.

Previous presenters have included:

  • Laila Bourhil,Human Rights Officer at the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights;
  • Jamil Dakwar,Director of the American Civil Liberties Union’s Human Rights Program;
  • Risa Kaufman,Executive Director, Human Rights Institute, Columbia Law School;
  • Ann Lehman, San Francisco Department on the Status of Women;
  • Juhu Thukral, Director of Law and Advocacy for The Opportunity Agenda; and
  • Miriam Yeung, Executive Director of the National Asian Pacific American Women’s Forum.

We have also offered an array of programming, such as:

  • The Fundamentals of Human Rights: Economic and Social Rights;
  • Crafting a Human Rights Media Strategy to Advance Your Domestic Campaign;
  • Employing International Human Rights Mechanisms for Domestic Advocacy;
  • A Guided Tour of the United Nations;
  • Reception with members of the Committee on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW);
  • The Arts and Community Organizing.

The Institute application is available on the Human Rights Project website. The application process is open until February 7, 2014. A limited number of scholarships are available for those eligible for financial assistance; those applications are due February 1, 2014.

Announcing the 2014 UW Law Summer Course in Cambodia: Global Health, Human Rights, and the Rights of the Child in Cambodia

Cambodia summer courseUniversity of Washington, Law H516, Global Health GH 590, College of Education EDLPS 600, International Studies JSIS 596

This course offers a unique, multidisciplinary graduate-level study opportunity in Cambodia. Focusing on health and human rights of children, particularly those who have a disability, the course provides a classroom experience and an applied, skills-building practicum that explores the theoretical underpinnings and the practical applications of the rights of the child in the context of Cambodia’s health system. Child rights are studied from legal and health services perspectives, combining methodologies of research and analysis required for quality field work.

The six-week course is approved for a total of 10 credits. Five of the credits are received through the practicum experience. The practicum experience will enable the student to work with NGOs and other health and legal professionals in the investigation and analysis of a faculty-guided and approved practicum project.

The course is open to graduate and professional students from other universities.

Check out the UW Study Abroad website and the program brochure. For questions, contact Beth Rivin (brivin@uw.edu) or course TA, Ashley Paintner (ashley.paintner@uw.edu).

Free Debt Relief Webinar, MLK Events and Save the Date for Mindfulness & the Practice of Law Retreat

December 18: Drowning in Debt? Learn How Gov’t & Non-Profit Workers Can Earn Public Service Loan Forgiveness- Free Webinar

EJW logo

Wednesday, December 18, from 12-1p.m. PST.

Hosted by Equal Justice Works.

To register click here: Drowning in Debt? How Government and Nonprofit Workers Can Earn Public Service Loan Forgiveness. As always, we’ll cover how income-driven repayment plans and Public Service Loan Forgiveness in-depth can help you manage your student debt and control your career and financial future.

A must attend for anyone with student debt, this free webinar explains how to reduce your monthly student loan payments and qualify for Public Service Loan Forgiveness. After the presentation (whether you are able to attend or not), you will be emailed a recording of the session that you can view at any time.

January 20: MLK Celebration Seattle Events

mlksea2014

Don’t miss out on all of the fantastic opportunities to celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s birthday and promote social and economic justice! Learn about all of the day’s activities and how to get involved here.

March 29: Save the Date! Integrating Mindfulness & Legal Practice- Washington Contemplative Lawyers Retreat on Vashon Island

Mindfulness Present Moment logo

Saturday, March 29, 10am-4:30pm

Cost: less than $20

Washington Contemplative Lawyers invites all lawyers, law students, law professors, and judges to join us for a day of basic mindfulness meditation instruction, guided practice, group discussion, and a potluck lunch in the beautiful Mann Studio at Ellisport beach on Vashon Island.

Appropriate for all levels of experience…beginners especially welcome! Instruction is secular and appropriate for persons of all backgrounds and beliefs.

For general information on mindfulness for legal professionals, a suggested resource is “The Meditative Perspective” located at the following link: http://www.spiritrock.org/document.doc?id=2153

For more information and registration please contact Sevilla Rhoads at SRhoads@gsblaw.com and take a look at our website: http://wacontemplativelaw.blogspot.com

Due to limited space at the retreat center, we need advance registration. Costs to be determined, but will be less than $20 per person.

Thank you and we look forward to seeing you in March!

“In this age of unprecedented distraction and information density, every professional needs tools to clear the mind, calm the body and reveal what matters most. It is both a practical, and a personal necessity. “

-Steven Keeva, Transforming Practices: Finding Joy and Satisfaction in the Legal Life

International Human Rights Day News and RSVP Deadline Extended for San Francisco Public Service Visit in January

How About We Celebrate Human Rights Every Day?

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By Anna Crosby, ACLU Human Rights Program

Henry Hill was 16 when he was charged for his involvement in a shooting that took place in a Michigan park. He is now 48 and has spent two-thirds of his life in a prison cell. Although in recent years the Supreme Court has struck down some laws that allow children to be committed to die in prison, the United States remains the last country in the world where children can still be sentenced to serve life without the possibility of parole. While the U.S. has historically provided global leadership on some human rights issues, Henry Hill serves as a grave reminder that we’re still out of step with rest of the world on many of the most fundamental human rights protections.

Sixty-three years ago today, the United Nations General Assembly proclaimed December 10 International Human Rights Day. It celebrates the birthday of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the foundational document expressing our collective will to advance human rights and “strive by progressive measures, national and international, to secure their universal and effective recognition and observance.”

This year also marks the 20th anniversary of the establishment of the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, the principal outcome of the landmark international conference on human rights which took place in Vienna in 1993.

The United States’ track record in some of what the UDHR calls the most basic of rights—the right to life, right to vote, freedom from torture, and economic rights, among others—is greatly in need of improvement. We often don’t practice what we preach. Just last week, at the annual summit hosted by Human Rights First, National Security Advisor Susan Rice publicly criticized the Iranian government for not allowing the U.N. Special Rapporteur on Human Rights to visit the country. The U.S., however, lacks credible leverage to change this policy when it continues to deny U.N. human rights experts unimpeded access to the prison at Guantánamo Bay.

In commemoration of this year’s Human Rights Day, we’re releasing a new fact sheet that provides a critical snapshot of 12 human rights issues the United States is failing to adequately address, including some astounding statistics on persons deprived of their liberty. In 2012, the number of people held in immigration detention reached 410,000 people, an increase of more than 400 percent since 1996. Fueled by over-incarceration policies and discrimination, the incarceration rate in the United States is still the highest in the world. Other issues addressed in our fact sheet include:

  • Women’s Rights
  • Criminal Justice (more specifically, capital punishment, life without parole for children)
  • Voting Rights
  • LGBT Rights
  • Rights of Persons with Disabilities
  • Socioeconomic Rights
  • Racial Profiling
  • Children’s Rights
  • Accountability for Torture

In addition to the areas addressed in the fact sheet, the United States also continues to set a poor example for other countries when it comes to mass surveillancetargeted killings, and more.

As our fact sheet explains:

Without doubt the U.S. continues to provide global leadership on some human rights issues. For example, the current administration provided vigorous leadership in fighting for LGBT equality, combating trafficking, and championing religious freedom and peaceful assembly rights. But while some U.S. laws and policies have been comparatively advanced in protecting civil rights and civil liberties, the U.S. has fallen behind in protecting the universal human rights recognized by the UDHR. Our government has only partially and selectively embraced these rights, ignoring international obligations and widening the gap between the United States’ sixty-five-year-old promise and its own current practice.

As we celebrate Human Rights Day, we cannot forget urgent and ongoing domestic human rights violations, like mass incarceration and juvenile life without parole. For people like Henry Hill, who has spent half of the UDHR‘s history behind bars, paying our respects to human rights once a year won’t get him home.

Twitter link: http://tiny.cc/gcaw7w

Human Rights Report Card Gives U.S. Poor Grades on Housing

NLCHPDecember 10, 2013, Washington D.C. – The National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty released its 2013 Human Right to Housing Report Card today, marked globally as human rights day, reviewing U.S. compliance with the human right to housing in the context of American homelessness over the past year. The report card found that while there were areas of improvement, much more needs to be done.

“In 2010, the federal government released a plan to end and prevent homelessness,” said Maria Foscarinis, Executive Director of the Law Center, “ensuring affordable housing to very low-income people is essential to ending and preventing homelessness, and many of the poor grades we assigned in this year’s report card reflect the failure to prioritize and fund such housing.”

There were encouraging policy developments this year, most notably the Violence-Against Women Act 2013 reauthorization, which significantly expanded housing rights for survivors of domestic violence. Additionally, a federal court mandate upheld the order forcing government compliance with Title V of the McKinney-Vento Act requiring government agencies to make vacant properties available to homeless service agencies.

In another significant development, the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness began holding its member agencies accountable to their human rights obligations, following up on a report it issued with the U.S. department of Justice last year on the criminalization of homelessness and in response to inquiries from the United Nations this year.

“The U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness deserves credit for beginning to hold its member agencies accountable to human rights standards following a question from the UN Human Rights Committee about the criminalization of homelessness in the U.S.,” said Eric Tars, Director of Human Rights & Children’s Rights Programs at the Law Center, “But we have yet to see actions being implemented, and our human rights obligations to our most vulnerable citizens remain compromised.”

In order to improve its grades next year, the Law Center recommends that funds be increased to at least $1 billion per year for federal homelessness prevention programs and $1 billion be devoted to the National Housing Trust Fund. The report also recommends that the Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act become permanent, the right to counsel be assured for all housing cases, and federal agencies develop funding incentives for communities to stop the criminalization of homelessness.

To read the report card, click here. For general inquiries, contact Selam Aberra.

The National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty is a leader in the movement to prevent and end homelessness. To achieve its goal, the Law Center uses three main strategies: policy advocacy, public education, and impact litigation.

Human Rights Essay Award Competition: Persons with Disabilities and International Human Rights Law

Academy of HR & Humanitarian Law

Deadline: February 1, 2014

This annual competition sponsored by the Academy on Human Rights and Humanitarian Law at American University Washington College of Law seeks to stimulate the production of scholarly work in international human rights law.

The 2014 topic is Persons with Disabilities and International Human Rights Law. Participants have the flexibility to choose any subject related to the assigned topic. The best articles may be published in the American University International Law Review.

The Academy will grant two Awards, one for the best article in English and one for the best article in Spanish. The Award in each case will consist of:

  • a scholarship to the Academy’s Program of Advanced Studies
  • travel expenses to and from Washington D.C.
  • housing at the university dorms
  • a per diem for living expenses

For detailed guidelines about the award please click here.

Deadline Extended! RSVP By December 17, 5pm ! San Francisco Public Service Employer Visit

SF

2014 SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SERVICE CITY VISIT: JANUARY 17, 2014

The  Center for Public Service Law has planned our third annual San Francisco  Public Interest Law City Visit for Friday, January 17, 2014.  On that day we will visit 4 public interest/public service agencies – two in Oakland  and two in San Francisco.  This year we will visit a variety of  organizations including the National Council on Crime and Delinquency, the US Citizen and Immigration Services (USCIS), the California Department of Justice (Attorney General’s Office) and the Ella Baker Center for Human Rights.  Over the past two years 13 UW Law students have taken this trip and visited different public service and public interest sites, receiving excellent exposure to public service law in San Francisco.

Who may attend?  UW law students.

Why attend? If you are interested in seeking summer positions in the San Francisco Bay Area or if you think you might practice public interest law in the Bay Area after graduating then this is a great opportunity to get a sense of the lay of the land.  At each place we visit, the  organization will give us a brief presentation and then lawyers on staff will answer our questions.  Meeting the public interest lawyers in these offices will help you to begin building relationships — which is vital to “breaking in” to a new community.  None of the employers we visit can guarantee our jobs for students, but students have created important connections and at least one secured an externship.  Two other organizations we have visited have welcomed collaborative projects with students or hosted Equal Justice  Works fellowship applications, based on us establishing relationships with them through the city visits.

What are the expenses? You must pay for your own airfare and lodging. On Friday we will provide lunch and public transportation fees.  Participants will be eligible for up to $150 reimbursement of documented travel expenses.

How to RSVP:  contact Dean Storms at mestorms@uw.edu if you are interested in attending or if you have additional questions.  Please do so by December 17 5pm as  we will want to confirm a minimum number of participants in order to go forward with the trip.