You’re Invited to Join the Peggy Browning Fund Panel Discussion This Tuesday, 4:00 PM

October 28: Social Justice Tuesday – The ROOTS Project: Good News from Africa

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Tuesday, Oct. 28, 2014
12:30-1:20 PM
Gates Hall, RM 127

Presented by Frank and Pam McKulka

2005 marked the end of a 21 year civil war in Sudan, which left more than 2 million dead. 2011 was the year that South Sudan became an independent country; tragically in December 2013 a rebellion began and many again have died or been displaced.

After working as a human rights investigator for the United Nations, Anyieth D’Awol, a South Sudanese woman established the ROOTS project in 2009. The organization’s mission is economic empowerment of women and preservation of traditional arts and crafts. More information at http://www.rootsofsouthsudan.org

Traditional and contemporary jewelry made at the Centre in Juba, South Sudan will be available on this date.

If you would like lunch please RSVP via Symplicity or gatespsl@u.washington.edu by 12:00 pm Monday, October 27. No RSVP for lunch accepted after 12:00 pm.

October 28: Peggy Browning Fund Panel Discussion & Networking Reception – Advocating for Workplace Justice

Peggy Browning Fund

Tuesday, Oct. 28, 2014
4:00-5:00 PM Panel Discussion
5:00-6:00 PM Networking reception with panelists, students and guests active in protecting workers’ rights
Gates Hall, RM 127

  • Learn about the Peggy Browning Fund’s Summer Fellowships
  • Hear what it’s like practicing law for a union, a law firm representing workers or a government agency regulating the workplace
  • Find out how to get a job promoting workplace justice

Free admission to Seattle law school students. Webcast available to students of Gonzaga University School of Law. Information on where to watch the webcast will be provided after you register.

Panelists:

  • Carson Flora | Schwerin Campbell Barnard Iglitzin & Lavitt, LLP | Moderator
  • Judy Krebs | General Counsel, SEIU Healthcare 775
  • David Mark | Attorney, Law Office of David N. Mark
  • Andrea Schmitt | Staff Attorney, Columbia Legal Services — Working Families Project
  • Ann Marie Skov | Field Attorney, NLRB Region 19 | PBF ’00

REGISTER by October 21 with the Peggy Browning Fund here.

October 29: Careers in Public Policy

public policy

Wednesday, Oct. 29, 2014
3:30-4:20 PM
Gates Hall, RM 119

Meet the practitioners and learn about their career paths and strategies in:

  • Legislative advocacy
  • Policy reform
  • Non-partisan policy work
  • Community relations
  • Non-profit management

Featuring:
Sumeer Singla, Precinct Liaison Attorney, Seattle City Attorney’s Office
Janet Varon, Executive Director, Northwest Health Law Advocates
Rep. Gerry Pollet, Executive Director, Heart of America NW &
46th District, WA State House of Representatives

November 14: 14th Annual Oregon Students of Color Conference

OSSC Conference

Reclaiming our Humanity and Redefining our Narratives: Telling our own Stories
Friday, Nov. 14, 2014 – Sunday, Nov. 16, 2014
Lane Community College, 4000 E. 30th Ave., Eugene, OR 97405

This year’s conference theme “Reclaiming Our Humanity and Redefining Our Narratives: Telling Our Own Stories” speaks to the ways in which communities of color are negatively portrayed in our society. How people of color are often so narrowly depicted and the ways in which mainstream media dehumanizes people of color. The conference seeks to educate participants about the social and political inequalities facing students color as well as focus on the need for people of color to reclaim themselves as full human beings. We must embrace all of our identities and push back on spaces of dichotomy – when it comes to race as well as gender, sexuality, and class. The Oregon Students of Color Conference provides a space where students of color and their allies can come together to develop the skills and critical analysis needed for the advancement of students of color socially, economically, politically, and emotionally.

REGISTRATION

Registration for the 14th Annual Oregon Students of Color Conference is now open!

REGISTRATION FEES AND DEADLINES

Early Bird Registration Deadline is October 17th:

    • Oregon Student Association Member Campus: $70/ per person
    • Non-Members: $80/ per person

Late Registration Deadline: October 24th:

      • Oregon Student Association Member Campus: $75/ per person
      • Non-Member Campuses: $85/ per person

Information and Registration: Click here.

November 14: Save the Date! Seeking Community Input Racial Justice Initiative: Racial Impact Statements

Equal Justice

Friday, Nov. 14, 2014
8:45 – 11:00 AM
Tukwila Community Center, 12424 42nd Ave. S., Tukwila, WA 98168

A joint Commission meeting between the Washington State Supreme Court Minority and Justice Commission & The Washington State Sentencing Guidelines Commission

Listen, Learn, & Participate ~ We want to hear from you!

Racial Impact Statements can be used as a tool for policymakers to address the potential racial impact of proposed legislation prior to enactment in order to reduce the scale of unwarranted disparities.

Please RSVP by emailing Cynthia.Delostrinos@courts.wa.gov. If you need any special accommodations, please send an email to the address listed above. Light refreshments and snacks will be provided.

Need A Good Laugh? Join SCLC For Its Annual Comedy Fundraiser!

October 18-30: Social Justice Film Festival

Preempting Dissent

UW Ethnic Cultural Theater
3931 Brooklyn Ave NE
Seattle, WA 98195

October 20: Civil Liberties Post 9/11 – Criminalizing Activism

Join us for a night of film and discussion to explore how post-9/11 protest policing and laws challenge the civil liberties of activists and citizens. Watch the movie Preempting Dissent, followed by a discussion with journalist Will Potter. Potter focuses on animal rights and environmental movements and will speak about the shocking movement to criminalize non-violent protest.

Schedule:
7:30 pm – Screening of Preempting Dissent
8:30 pm – A Conversation with Will Potter

Cost:
Suggested Donation of $5

Click here to buy tickets.  Click here for more information.

October 18: Film Screening of Documented with Jose Antonio Vargas

Documented

Doors at 5:30
Saturday, Oct. 18, 2014
Wing Luke Museum, 719 S King Street, Seattle
RSVP is required: click here.

Please join us for a screening of the film: “Documented”, by Filipino undocumented American filmmaker and activist Jose Antonio Vargas.

This is an excellent film and we’re thrilled that Jose will be joining us in-person for Q&A panel, joined by Jill Mangaliman of Gabriela Seattle.

The event is free and open to the public, hosted by the Filipino American community as a part of the Carlos Bulosan Centennial Celebration.

October 20: Global Mondays Lecture – “Think Global, Act Local – Supporting Immigrant & Refugee Communities in Seattle”

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Sahar Fathi, Policy Analyst, City of Seattle Office of Immigrant & Refugee Affairs
Monday, Oct. 20, 2014
12:30-1:20
William H. Gates Hall, RM 117
*Lunch served*

The City of Seattle Office of Immigrant and Refugee Affairs promotes a citywide culture that understands and values the contributions of immigrant and refugee communities. It partners with the Seattle Immigrant and Refugee Commission, other City departments, community organizations and members of the private sector to improve services for the Immigrant and Refugee communities and to ensure a consistent implementation of principles of social justice issues. Under Sahar’s lead, OIRA just launched the Refugee Women’s Institute, an innovative program designed to build understanding and trust between refugee communities in Seattle and the Seattle Police Department (SPD). The institute, the first of its kind in the nation, aims to build a grassroots network of refugee women leaders while increasing the cultural competency of the female officers who participate.

Sahar Fathi (JD ’08) is a policy analyst for the Seattle Office of Immigrant and Refugee Affairs. She has served as a legislative aide to Councilmember Mike O’Brien on the Seattle City Council and as a legal clerk for the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. Sahar earned a JD and a Masters in International Studies from the University of Washington, and graduated cum laude from USC with a dual BA in French and International Relations. She attended the Sorbonne Université in Paris, France on exchange, and received a diploma in International and European Law from the Université Jean-Moulin in Lyon, France.

Hosted by UW Law Global Affairs, Gates Public Service Law and the Immigrant Families Advocacy Project (IFAP)

October 30: U-Visa Certification Program at the US Department of Labor

DOL Seal

U-VISA CERTIFICATION PROGRAM at the U.S. Department of Labor

INFO SESSION // Meet and Greet
Thursday, October 30, 2014, 1:30 PM – 3:30 PM
300 Fifth Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104
11th Floor, Room 1125

Jennifer Tse, the Western Region U-Visa Coordinator for the Wage and Hour Division of the U.S. Department of Labor will be here to share information about the U-Visa and the Department’s certification process and protocols.

Jennifer Tse is the U Visa Coordinator for the Western Region in the Wage and Hour Division of the U.S. Department of Labor.  Her region covers eight states and three U.S. territories, including Guam, American Samoa, and the Northern Mariana Islands.  In her position as the U Visa Coordinator, she works with exploited workers and makes recommendations whether to certify immigrant victims of labor crimes for immigration relief.  Of the labor crimes, she works especially with victims of trafficking crimes.  Prior to her position with the Department of Labor, Jennifer was an attorney at the Immigrant Justice Project of the Southern Poverty Law Center in Atlanta.  She worked both as an immigration attorney and in litigation primarily involving class-action labor trafficking, workers’ rights, and civil rights cases. She has provided technical legal support and trainings related to immigration relief on behalf of victims of human trafficking, including U and T visas, to federal government officials, national civil rights organizations, advocates, and private firm attorneys.  She is also a member of the White House Initiative on Asians and Pacific Islanders’ Regional Interagency Working Group for Region IX.  A California native, Jennifer received her J.D. from Santa Clara University School of Law and her B.A. from UCLA.

November 5: 4th Annual LOL for SCLC Comedy Fundraiser!

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Wednesday, Nov. 5, 2014
6:30-8:30 PM
Parlor Live! Comedy Club in Downtown Seattle

The Seattle Community Law Center provides accessible legal advocacy to people living with physical and mental disabilities so that they may obtain the resources necessary to overcome barriers to financial and medical stability. Simply put, SCLC helps break the cycle of homelessness. Seattle has the highest population of people in Washington living with disabilities that need help with legal problems.  If we want a strong safety net to ensure all people can achieve economic and medical stability, we all have to do our part.

Join us in celebrating and supporting the great work of the Seattle Community Law Center and share a few good laughs at our upcoming 4thAnnual Comedy Fundraiser LOL for SCLC comedy event on Wednesday, November 5th! The show starts at 6:30 and will end around 8:30.  It will be held at Parlor Live! Comedy Club in Downtown Seattle.  Pat Cashman [Almost Live!] and his son Chris Cashman [the 206] will be hosting this event.

Attendance at the event is free this year, and the suggested donation is $100 but no one will be turned away for lack of funds.

Please see the RSVP here and join us for a few laughs, raffle items, great company, and of course to support a good cause. Bring your friends-You can RSVP for them too!

June 12-14: Save the Date for the Access to Justice Conference in Wenatchee, WA

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The Access to Justice Board and our Conference Co-Chairs, Hon. Ann Schindler and Colleen Kinerk, are pleased to announce that the Washington State Access to Justice Conference is back by popular demand!  Please mark your calendars for three days of community, skills and leadership development in sunny Wenatchee and look for registration materials in early April.

If you would like to be involved in the conference planning or have questions or comments, please contact Terra Nevitt, Access to Justice Board Manager at terran@wsba.org.

Gearing up for 2015? Many Fellowships Now Accepting Applications!

Ella Summer Internship Program with the Center for Constitutional Rights Now Accepting Applications, Due 10/24 for 2Ls and 12/19 for 1Ls

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The Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR) is a non-profit legal and educational organization dedicated to advancing and protecting the rights guaranteed by the United States Constitution and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

CCR created the Ella Baker Summer Internship Program in 1987 to honor the legacy of Ella Baker, a hero of the civil rights movement, and to train the next generation of social justice lawyers. Our program uses a combination of theory and practice to train talented and committed law students on how to work alongside social movements, community organizations, and impacted individuals. Through our program, interns gain practical litigation experience and sharpen their theoretical understanding of the relationship between social change, organizing and lawyering.

The Ella Baker Program is sponsored by the Bertha Foundation which hosts law students and emerging lawyers at legal organizations across the world. As a result, Ella Baker Interns are connected to a global community of social justice law students and lawyers through the Bertha Legal Network.

For a complete job description and application details, click here.

 

Attention 3Ls and Recent Grads! Roderick and Solange Macarthur Justice Center at New Orleans Seeking Attorney, Due 10/31

Roderick and Solange MacArthur Justice Center

The MacArthur Justice Center is seeking an attorney for its office located in New Orleans, Louisiana. The Center is a public interest law firm that brings high-impact cases targeted at reforming the criminal justice system.

The Center is looking for a talented, dedicated attorney to fill an attorney position. Applicants should have a minimum of two years of experience in criminal or civil litigation, high academic qualifications, exemplary writing and oral argument skills, ability to work in a team, and a demonstrated commitment to the rights of poor persons in the criminal justice system. Membership in the Louisiana Bar is preferred, but persons eligible to take the bar examination within 6 months of hiring may apply.

For a complete job description and application details, click here.

American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) Offering Fellowship Program Beginning September 2015, Due 11/17

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The Legal Department of the America Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (“AFL-CIO”) is offering a one-year fellowship beginning in September 2015.  The fellowship offers an excellent opportunity for recent law school graduates to work with experienced union-side lawyers on a wide variety of issues.

The AFL-CIO Fellow will work with lawyers in the AFL-CIO Legal Department and with other union lawyers around the country on a wide range of activities.  The Fellow will assist experienced lawyers working on cases and regulatory matters that affect the legal movement and the rights of workers.  The AFL-CIO’s litigation caseload includes cases in the U.S. Supreme Court, the U.S. Court of Appeals, the NLRB and a small number of state appellate suits.  In addition, the AFL-CIO Legal Department frequently presents the views of the labor movement on federal regulatory initiatives affecting workers.  Whenever possible, the Fellow will be given the opportunity to participate in meetings with union lawyers and to attend oral arguments. The AFL-CIO Fellow will also participate in Lawyers Coordinating Committee activities, including preparation for attorney conferences, outreach to new labor lawyers and law students, and regular opportunities to attend LCC meetings and conferences.

For a complete job description and application details, click here.

Kitsap County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office Offering Temporary Position

Kitsap County Prosecuting Atty Office

The Kitsap County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office is soliciting applications for an extra help deputy prosecuting attorney in the Civil Division to perform work in the areas of land use, real estate, public contracting, and Washington general municipal law.

To apply, please submit a résumé, cover letter, and writing sample to Jacquelyn M. Aufderheide, Kitsap County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office, 614 Division Street, MS-35A, Port Orchard, WA  98366, or apply online here

Tom Steel Post-Graduate Fellowship, Due 1/15/15

Pride Law Fund

The Tom Steel Post-Graduate Fellowship provides funding for a new lawyer to work in the United States on an innovative, public interest law project that serves the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community.

The Fellowship will help ensure that unmet legal needs are recognized and prioritized on an on-going basis, and that the next generation of legal advocates for the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community develops the critical skills necessary to secure civil rights into the future.

Pride Law Fund seeks to fund “cutting edge” projects with the potential to make a lasting impact. Persons are eligible to apply if they are law students eligible to graduate in the Spring semester, or are lawyers within three years of their graduation from law school. Additional requirements are set forth in the application materials.

For a complete description and application details, click here.

MENA Human Rights Advocacy Fellowship Seeking Applicants, Fluency in Arabic Required

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The Gender Law and Policy Project (GLPP) is seeking applicants for a one year Middle East and North Africa (MENA) Human Rights Advocacy Fellowship Position working on gender-based violence and LGBT violence and discrimination in the MENA region. The fellow will also work closely with MADRE, an international women’s human rights organization.

Our project works to promote the rights, protection and physical security of marginalized and at-risk populations. We integrate advocacy and capacity building, with documentation and reporting of LGBT and women’s human rights violations in order to bring accountability and redress for these crimes in transitional justice processes. We also aim to increase participation of women within national and international venues charged with upholding human rights and building peace.

For a complete description and application details, click here.

Lambda Defense and Education Fund Offering Fair Courts Project Internship for Fall, Spring, and Summer

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Lambda Legal’s Education and Public Affairs Department seeks a law student for Fall, Spring and Summer semester internships.

Lambda Legal is the nation’s oldest and largest legal organization committed to achieving full equality for lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, transgender people and people with HIV through impact litigation, education and public policy work. Founded in 1973 and headquartered in New York City, Lambda Legal has regional offices in Los Angeles, Chicago, Atlanta and Dallas. Lambda Legal’s law reform, policy and education work encompasses a wide range of areas, including federal and state constitutional law issues, discrimination in employment, benefits, housing, insurance, schools and other areas, harassment and violence, antigay ballot initiatives, access to healthcare and HIV-related treatments, child custody, visitation and adoption, the freedom to marry and sodomy law reform.

For a complete job description and application details, click here.

Earthjustice’s Seattle Office Seeking Externs for Winter & Spring 2015

EarthJustice Logo

The Northwest office of Earthjustice is currently accepting applications for externships for Winter and Spring 2015, with a preference for at least 20 hours per week.

Earthjustice is a nonprofit environmental law firm, representing—without charge—hundreds of public interest clients, large and small.  Earthjustice works through the courts to safeguard public lands, national forests, parks, and wilderness areas; to defend the right of all people to a healthy environment; to reduce air and water pollution; to prevent toxic contamination; and to preserve endangered species and wildlife habitat.  Founded in 1971 as Sierra Club Legal Defense Fund, Earthjustice has played a leading role in shaping the development of environmental law.

Externs will have an opportunity to work with several attorneys on case development and litigation.  Students may draft pleadings, briefs, and other legal documents; perform legal research and prepare legal memoranda; develop strategy and legal theories; and attend court proceedings, full-office argument moots, meetings with clients, and conferences with opposing counsel.

 For a complete job description and application details, click here.

Need to Learn the Ins and Outs of Getting Funding? Look No Further!

Post Graduate Short Term Public Service Funding 2014

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The Post-Graduate Fellowship Program was initiated in 2013 and seeks to support new UW law graduates who are seeking employment, and who wish to provide legal services for underserved populations, by providing limited financial support while Fellows continue to search for permanent positions after the bar exam. This support will allow Fellows to continue to develop skills, contacts, and professional experience through short-term volunteer work, enabling them to better compete for permanent positions once they become available.

Each fellow must volunteer with an eligible sponsor organization, doing work that requires a JD or draws heavily on the Fellow’s legal education and training. Eligible work may include, for example, legal advocacy, direct legal services, impact litigation, or community education and organizing.

Fellowship awards will consist of a maximum of $1500 per Fellow, renewable on a monthly basis, for a maximum of four months (up to $6000 total). Fellowships must begin between August 1, 2014 and September 30, 2014, and may end no later than January 31, 2015. Fellowships will end when the Fellow finds a permanent position or at the end of the four-month fellowship period, whichever comes sooner. Recipients and sponsoring agencies will be required to certify that they will adhere to each of the goals and guidelines of the Fellowship program.

The University of Washington School of Law is accepting applications from June 2014 graduates for a limited number of short-term, post-graduate Fellowships. Applications can be accessed on Symplicity and must be uploaded to Symplicity no later than Sunday, May 4, 2014 at 11:59 p.m.

Questions?  Contact Dean Storms.

Social Justice, Conflict Resolution, and Reconciliation: An Introductory Workshop to Kingian Nonviolence on May 1-2

Martin Luther King Jr.

Hosted by: University of Washington and Bellevue College

Kingian Nonviolence is a framework for transforming and reconciling conflict that was developed out of the teachings of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and the organizing strategies of the Civil Rights Movement. The goal is to prevent violence, yes, but its ambitions are even bigger: to pursue reconciliation by putting strength and agency in the hands of those who choose to act, talk, and think in healthy, humanly-connected ways that pursue a common higher ground. An approach of nonviolence, as a result, has wide applicability for how people set goals, declare values, and interact with others. In this workshop we will study the nature of human conflict, the roots of violence, the principles of nonviolence, and the “six steps of Kingian Nonviolence,” which will discuss the role of direct action, education, negotiation, and other steps critical in movement building. Specifically, we will address strategies and principles on how to respond to both interpersonal conflict as well as larger social conflicts.

Dates and Cost

We ask participants to commit to both days of the workshop.

May 1 @ Bellevue College: 4:00 – 4:30 PM sign-in, 4:30 – 8:30 PM
May 2 @ University of Washington, 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM

Cost is $25 per person, to be paid in cash or check at registration sign-in. An introductory manual is included in this fee. Specific room details will be provided after registration; sandwiches and snacks will be provided each day.

For more information, click here.

Working in Civil Legal Aid, Public Defense or Gov’t Agency this Summer? Still Looking for Summer Funding? Americorps JD May be Right for You! Deadline Extended to May 2

EJW Logo

The deadline for students to apply to our AmeriCorps JD program to receive a $1,175 Segal AmeriCorps Education Award has been extended through May 2.

We have more spots available for students working with various populations in any area of law in addition to funding for students providing legal services to veterans, including those serving at legal aid, public defender, other nonprofit organizations, or local, county or state government agencies.

These funds are currently underutilized, so please take advantage of this invaluable opportunity!  By completing a simple application and consenting to a background check, students have the opportunity to earn additional funds for the work they are already doing this summer and throughout the school year while still being able to receive outside funding up to $4,300.

For a step by step guide on the application process, click here.  Click here to apply online.

Show me the money! Resources and Tips for Grant writing from the Gallagher Law Library

Dubs

Photo courtesy of Ghallagher Blogs

Want to start your own legal services or social justice organization? The Gallagher Law Library has compiled some fabulous resources for public service startups.

Check it out here.

 

 

Final Reminder! Report Pro Bono Hours by Monday, April 28!

Wouldn’t it be amazing if we could say 100% of UW Law students, faculty and staff give back to the community!?   

  • Did you volunteer for IFAP, IMAP, SYLAW, ITMP, ELS, research project  NW Detention Center Project or a community-based legal organization between April 2013 and March 2014?

 

    • Did you volunteer as a case manager or leader for one of these student-led pro bono projects?
  • Did you intern last summer for a public interest organization and didn’t get a summer grant, stipend or externship credit?

 

If you can answer YES to any of these questions you are likely eligible to participate in the Pro Bono Honors Program!

APRIL 28 IS FAST APPROACHING! And, it’s the last day to submit the online form so that you can be recognized with fellow students, faculty and staff with a Pro Bono Service Award! Don’t forget the program recognizes student leaders pro bono legal assistance projects as well as legal assistance hours. 2Ls, 3Ls and LLM students with 30 hours (10 hours for 1Ls) of qualifying pro bono service will be recognized.

Your efforts are greatly appreciated and you will be recognized at the May 8 PILA TGIT!

 Not in it for the award? We get it. The Pro Bono Honors Program though gives us the opportunity to tell the story of UW Law and what our commitment to public service really looks like.  We are also able to pull together resources to help future generations of students connect to the volunteer opportunities that resonate for them.  So please take the time to do this!

Law Student Checklist:

For First-Time Student Participants

  • Tie your UWNet ID to a GMail account if you haven’t already.
  • Make sure your pro bono work qualifies or contact acarton@uw.edu if you’re not sure.
  • Attend the Annual Core Competencies Training on October 12, 2013. Missed a training? Go to our training page for resources and podcasts.
  • Keep track of your hours (download optional tracking log):
    • We’ll need you to tell us if you you’re providing direct legal assistance and/or if you’ve been in a pro bono leadership role.
    • You’ll need a minimum of 30 hours performed between April 1, 2013 and March 31, 2014.
  • Draft Essay: Write a 600-1000 word reflective essay about your pro bono work experience, observations made about the clients you’ve served or the organization you worked for and/or reflections about your professional path in public service law.
  • Certify training attendance, report hours and submit essay by Monday, April 28: Complete the online web form.

For Returning Student Participants

  • Tie your UWNet ID to a GMail account if you haven’t already.
  • Make sure your pro bono work qualifies or contact acarton@uw.edu if you’re not sure.
  • Keep track of your hours (download optional tracking log):
    • We’ll need you to tell us if you you’re providing direct legal assistance and/or if you’ve been in a pro bono leadership role.
    • You’ll need a minimum of 30 hours performed between April 1, 2013 and March 31, 2014.
  • Report hours by Monday, April 28: Complete the online web form.

Looking for a Career in Public Service or Simply More Direct Client Work? Check Out These Announcements

Are You Primarily Interested in a Career in Public Service Law? Has it Been a While Since you Last Met with Your Public Service Career Coach?

CPSLlogo.

Whether you’ve got summer plans lined up or not, now’s a great time to reconnect with your public service career coach. We can help you strategize and discuss internships, externships, fellowships, pro bono, clinics, post grad planning and beyond, not to mention interview and networking tips. Not sure who you should be meeting with? 1Ls and 2Ls should contact Assistant Director Aline Carton-Listfjeld or schedule directly in Symplicity. 3Ls should contact Assistant Dean Michele Storms.

Youth Opportunities Act Opens Doors to Thousands of Young Adults across Washington State

By Columbia Legal Services

hands encircling sun

Photo courtesy of Abdullah üsame Deniz and StockVault.

OLYMPIA – Governor Jay Inslee plans to sign the Youth Opportunities Act (HB 1651) into law tomorrow, after years of negotiations resulted in overwhelming, bipartisan support for the bill from the Washington State Legislature. The Act will result in the sealing of 6,000-10,000 young adults’ juvenile offense records each year, allowing them to receive greater opportunities in housing, education, and employment. Championed by Rep. Ruth Kagi (D-32), and negotiated by Sen. Jeannie Darneille (D-27) and Sen. Steve O’Ban (R-32), the bill received near unanimous support in the Legislature.

“The Youth Opportunities Act eliminates a major barrier for many rehabilitated youth who can now contribute fully to their communities,” said Casey Trupin, Attorney with the Children & Youth project at Columbia Legal Services (CLS). “By supporting one of the biggest juvenile justice reforms in decades, the Legislature has offered a path for young adults to pursue education, employment, and housing.” For four years, CLS has worked closely with partners such as Friends of YouthFaith Action NetworkMockingbird SocietyChildren’s Alliance, and many other strong advocates to ensure this bill passed.

Continue reading here.

Looking for a Chance to Work with Clients?  The Moderate Means Program is Recruiting Interns for Spring and Summer Quarters, Applications Due 4/11

Coins

Photo courtesy of StockVault.

The Statewide Moderate Means Program (MMP) is a joint venture between the Washington State Bar Association and the Washington State law schools. The goal of the program is to increase access to civil legal services by people of moderate means who cannot afford an attorney but make too much money to qualify for traditional legal aid services. The program is focused on the areas of Family, Housing and Consumer law.

Law students serving as MMP volunteer interns will interview potential clients by telephone to collect information and evaluate their cases. Qualifying cases will be referred by the MMP interns to participating attorneys who have agreed to represent Moderate Means Program clients for a reduced fee. MMP interns will be expected to commit to a minimum of five hours a week for the duration of spring quarter and this summer (one hour is a weekly staff meeting).

Click here for more information.

America’s Growing Inequality: The Impact of Poverty and Race Publication Explores Poverty & Race

Americas Growing Inequality Impact Poverty Cover

America’s Growing Inequality: The Impact of Poverty and Race, edited by Chester Hartman is now available in hardcover – includes the best articles and essays from Poverty & Race; with a foreword by Congressman Luis Gutierrez. The book is a compilation of the best and still-most-relevant articles published in Poverty & Race, the bimonthly of The Poverty & Race Research Action Council from 2006 to the present. Authors are some of the leading figures in a range of activities around these themes. It is the fourth such book PRRAC has published over the years, each with a high-visibility foreword writer: Rep. John Lewis, Rep. Jesse Jackson, Jr. Bill Bradley, Julian Bond in previous books, Rep. Luis Gutierrez of Chicago for this book. The
chapters are organized into four sections: Race & Poverty: The Structural Underpinnings; Deconstructing Poverty and Racial Inequities; Re(emerging) Issues; Civil Rights History.

Order here at the PRRAC discounted rate; see the Table of Contents here.

Missed the Recent SJT on Public Interest Post Grad Fellowships? Don’t Fret. We’ve got all of the info right here!

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Download our presentation slides here and watch the podcast here. You’ll find all of the essentials on the nuts and bolts of organizational and project based public interest post grad fellowships, how to find them and some strategies for successful applications.

Kirwan Institute Releases Second State of the Science: Implicit Bias Review 2014

Kirwan Institute Logo

With the results in the Zimmerman and Dunn trials, introducing people to Implicit Bias research seems more important than ever. The Kirwan Institute is excited to be able to continue to support the field with this new edition of State of the Science: Implicit Bias Review. Chapter 1 serves as a primer to introduce the topic, capturing some of the key ideas that were discussed at length in the 2013 edition. The next two chapters focus on the newest scholarly literature from 2013 (Chapter 2 reviews many of these recent publications, and Chapter 3 takes a step back to reflect on some of the larger trends occurring in the field). Chapters 4 and 5 delve into the concept of implicit racial bias as it operates within particular domains, specifically employment and housing (building on the sectors discussed in last year’s edition: Education, Health and Criminal Justice). The publication closes with materials in the appendices that we thought might be useful to those who are seeking to educate others regarding implicit racial bias, including “A Conversation with an Implicit Bias Skeptic.”

Click here to download the report.

Hunger Strikers Released from Solitary Confinement at the Northwest Detention Center

Activists rally outside the ICE Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma, Washington on March 11, 2014

Photo of activists rallying outside the ICE Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma, Washington on March 11, 2014, courtesy of Reuters and Jason Redmond.

By Columbia Legal Services & American Civil Liberties Union

Federal immigration authorities have released hunger strikers from solitary confinement at the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma, Washington. The action came after the ACLU of Washington (ACLU-WA) and Columbia Legal Services (CLS) filed a lawsuit seeking a court order to prohibit U.S. Immigration and Enforcement (ICE) from retaliating against detainees who engage in First Amendment-protected activities by placing them in solitary confinement.

“Our clients are very grateful to be out of solitary confinement after 6 days in it. This is a victory for free speech and fair treatment,” said Melissa Lee, Attorney and Institutions Project Coordinator with CLS.

“We’re very pleased that ICE has stopped retaliating against detainees engaged in peaceful protest. Punishing hunger strikers by putting them in isolation cells was an unlawful attempt to chill free speech rights” said ACLU-WA Legal Director Sarah Dunne.

Continue reading here.

Mediation Training from a Social Justice Perspective Conducted by the Social Justice Mediation Institute, May 19-23

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Hosted by the City of Seattle Alternative Dispute Resolution Program.

$450 if registration completed before April 15.  $500 after April 15.  Some fee reductions available.

35.0 CLEs (5.0 ethics) approved.  (There will be a charge of $25 for members of the Washington State Bar Association asking for CLEs.)

For application and more information, please send an e-mail to Vivien.sharples@seattle.gov

This institute prepares trainees to mediate while applying a social justice lens to their own techniques.  We explore how mediation can routinely replicate inequalities despite our intensions to the contrary.  Trainees gain strategies to address these challenges while still facilitating a process with self-determination about the outcome for the disputing parties.   Concepts from narrative theory are applied to equip mediators with additional tools for effectively understanding the dispute and building agreements.

For more information about the training, click here.

Equal Justice Works, Skadden, Echoing Green, AmeriCorps… Oh My! Navigating Public Interest Fellowships

March 31: Global Mondays: Truth, Justice and Reparation in Northern Ireland

Northern Ireland Flag

Monday, Mar. 31, 2014
12:30-1:20 PM, Gates Hall RM 117 (unless noted)

Hosted by UW Law Graduate Program in Sustainable International Development and the PhD Program, and the Comparative Law & Society Studies (CLASS) Center

“Dealing with the Past: Narrating Truth in Northern Ireland”

Dr. Kathleen Cavanaugh, Irish Center for Human Rights, National University of Ireland

In truth telling processes in transitional societies, such as Northern Ireland, mechanisms established to find the truth, such as truth commissions, endeavour to find a common narrative emerging about the causes of conflict. At the same time, there is now evidence that such processes also create silences; some narratives are not fully represented. This lecture will provide some background on the conflict in Northern Ireland and how such a meta-conflict situation has given rise to conflicts over memories of state.

Image courtesy of Stockvault and Nicolas Raymond.

April 1: Social Justice Tuesday: Public Interest Post Graduate Fellowships

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Tuesday, Apr. 1, 2014
12:30-1:20 PM, RM 133

Speaker: Aline Carton-Listfjeld, Center for Public Service Law

Equal Justice Works, Skadden, Echoing Green, AmeriCorps…Oh my!

Trying to make sense of the all the fellowships out there? Get vital resources and learn about the different types of fellowships for recent law grads with experience and passion for social justice and public interest law. 1Ls and 2Ls are strongly encouraged to attend.

If you would like lunch please RSVP via Symplicity or Email by 12:00 pm Monday, March 31.

April 2-3: Clinics Information Fair

2014 Clinic Info Week Schedule

April 7: Global Mondays, LGBT Rights Internationally: Russia, India, Uganda, Nigeria and Beyond

Monday, Apr. 7, 2014
12:30 – 1:20 PM, RM 127
Speakers from the International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission:

Jessica Stern

Jessica Stern is the Executive Director of the International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission. As the first researcher on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) human rights at Human Rights Watch, she conducted fact-finding investigations and advocacy around sexual orientation and gender identity in countries including Iran, Kyrgyzstan, South Africa, and the United Arab Emirates. She holds a masters degree in human rights from the London School of Economics. She is frequently quoted in the Mail & Guardian, Al Jazeera English, the Associated Press, Reuters, Agence France Presse, Deutsche Welle, Voice of America, The Guardian and The BBC.

Grace Poore

Grace Poore, from Malaysia, has been the Regional Program Coordinator for Asia and the Pacific Islands at the International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission (IGLHRC) since 2007.  She develops the work in Asia, oversees multi-country projects on human rights documentation and advocacy in Asia, and conducts trainings.  She co-wrote the video “Courage Unfolds” about LGBT activism in Asia and the Yogyakarta Principles.  Ms. Poore holds a Masters degree from Syracuse University, Newhouse School of Communications.  She is currently working on a report about violence against lesbians, bisexual women, and transgender people in five Asian countries.

May 5: Gates Public Service Law Speaker Series: Professor Thomas Buergenthal Speaking on “Becoming an International Judge via the Holocaust”

Thomas Buergenthal

Monday, May 5, 2014
4:30 – 5:30 PM, RM 133
Reception to follow at the Burke Museum

Thomas Buergenthal is the Lobingier Professor of Comparative Law and Jurisprudence at George Washington University. He came to the United States at the age of 17. He spent the first 11 years of his life in various German camps and is one of the youngest survivors of the Auschwitz and Sachsenhausen concentration camps. Considered one of the world’s leading international human rights experts, Professor Buergenthal was a Judge and President of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights as well as President of the Administrative Tribunal of the Inter-American Development. He was a member of the UN Human Rights Committee and UN Truth Commission for El Salvador. He is a member of the Ethics  Commission of the International Olympic Committee and the honorary president of the Inter-American Institute of Human Rights in San José.

Co-Sponsors: The Jackson School, the UW Center for Human Rights, Hillel, and the  Jewish Studies Department. 

Reception Sponsored by the Gates Public Service Law Program and the UW Center for Human Rights. (Sponsorship of this event by the University of Washington School of Law and the W.H. Gates Public Service law Program does not imply endorsement.)

RSVP via Symplicity or email.