Have an Interest in Pursuing a Career in Elder Law? The UW Retirement Association Seeks Applicants for $4,000 Scholarship

Are a you a UW Law student? Have an Interest in Pursuing a Career in Elder Law? The UW Retirement Association Seeks Applicants for $4,000 Scholarship! Applications Due Feb. 3

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Each year, UWRA awards scholarships to UW undergraduate, graduate and professional students who are preparing for careers related to aging. Students from a wide variety of disciplines have received these scholarships, which are awarded in Spring quarter each year. UWRA has also endowed a Graduate Fellowship in Aging that is awarded each year by the Graduate School. Learn about the Graduate Fellowship here. Each year’s Scholarship and Fellowship recipients join with UWRA members for a scholarship celebration in the spring.

For more information, click here.

Want to Join the Fight to End the Criminalization of Homelessness?  National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty releases report on, Human Rights to Human Reality

NLCHP

A 10 Step Guide to Strategic Human Rights Advocacy

Working consistently for the past two decades, the Law Center is achieving unprecedented success in getting federal agencies to address the criminalization of homelessness as a human rights violation. This guide presents ten steps as a case study of our experiences that we believe can help others achieve broader respect for, and implementation of, human rights.

Click here to access the report.

Interested in Exploring Global Health Law and Policy Issues? Join the Legal and Policy Solutions to Improve the Global Health of Women, Children & Adolescents Lecture Series

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If you are interested in exploring global health law and policy issues from a multidisciplinary perspective, please join us for Legal and Policy Solutions to Improve the Global Health of Women, Children & Adolescents, a lecture series and course that meets Tuesdays from 5:30 – 7 pm Winter Quarter.

Each Tuesday, we invite three expert practitioners –one from medicine/public health/health science, one from law/policy, and one from a community organization/NGO –  to discuss health topics that impact women, children and adolescents in the US and around the world.  We have some amazing speakers lined up so far, ranging from a pediatrician from Kenya who works to prevent mother-child HIV transmission to a Seattle City Councilwoman who has led advocacy for a paid parental leave ordinance.

Feel free to attend any session.  The series is also open to all UW students and the public, so you can attend any session that is of interest without enrolling for course credit.

Enrollment/grading.  You can also enroll to receive one course credit for attending the speaker series (LAW H518 A/B) or two credits for attending both the speaker series and a small discussion group that meets beforehand from 4:20 – 5:20 pm (LAW H518 C/D, meeting in Room 115).  Both sections will be graded on a credit/no credit basis.  Students of the speaker series (LAW H518 A/B) receive credit for attending the lectures – readings are optional.  Students of the discussion group (LAW H518 C/D) receive credit for reading the assigned articles and participating in the discussion.

Course organizers:  Jennifer Lenga-Long, JD; Tanya Karwaki, JD, LLM; Brandi Shah MD, MPH; and Jennifer Slyker, PhD

Click here for the scheduled topics.

Clerkships, Fellowship, and Internship Opportunities for Social Justice

U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants Seeking Program Intern in Spring 2015, Due 1/5/15

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U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants (USCRI), a non-governmental, not-for-profit national organization dedicated to addressing the needs and rights of refugees and immigrants, seeks interns to provide support to USCRI’s Immigrant Children’s Legal Program (formerly the National Center for Refugee and Immigrant Children). Our office is located in Crystal City, part of the Washington D.C. metropolitan area.

The Immigrant Children’s Legal Program (ICLP) assists undocumented immigrant children ages 0-18 who are in removal proceedings. ICLP screens children for eligibility for legal relief from deportation; recruits and trains volunteer attorneys; and matches children with attorneys.

For more information on the internship, click here.

Attention 1Ls and 2Ls! Litigation Judicial Intern Opportunity Applications Now Open, Due 1/9/15

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The American Bar Association Section of Litigation will begin accepting applications for its Summer 2015 Judicial Intern Opportunity Program on November 3. Applications for first-year law students will be accepted December 1, 2014, in accordance with NALP guidelines. The program is a full-time (32 hours per week), six-week minimum, summer internship program open to all first- or second-year diverse law students. Screening interviews will begin in December and will continue through the application process.  The first 500 applicants will be guaranteed at least one interview.

Please review detailed program information or frequently asked questions prior to applying to the program. Students do not need to be an ABA member to apply, however they will be required to join the ABA and the Section of Litigation if selected to the program.   Applications must be submitted by the January 9, 2015 deadline. Screening interviews will be used to better determine student qualifications.  Screening interviews will begin in December and will continue through the application process.  The first 500 applicants will be guaranteed at least one interview.  Additional applicants will be interviewed on an as needed basis.  We will make every attempt to interview students where they attend school and in person.  Students will be contacted by their assigned screener to set up the interview.

Only qualified students will be sent on for judicial interviews.  Students will be notified when they are sent on for a judicial interview.  Judicial interviews will continue until all positions are filled.  All applicants will be notified when the program or certain locations have closed for the year and all positions are filled.

The program is only open to students who have not previously participated as an intern in the program. 

For more information, click here.

Clerkship Opportunities with Institute for Justice, Preferred Submissions Before 1/9/15

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The Institute for Justice, the national law firm for liberty, is currently hiring for spring and summer clerkships.  Clerkships are a great way to get a foot in the door at IJ and make direct contributions to cutting-edge public interest litigation.  Clerks are an integral part of our team—we rely on them for help with our current casework in addition to legal research that will factor into our strategic litigation for years to come.

The application for our highly-competitive summer clerkship is live now.  Students are encouraged to apply well before the January 9th deadline.  We’ll begin interviews in early January with rolling offers until all positions are filled.  The clerkships last for 10 weeks.

Is your law school near our headquarters office in Arlington, Virginia or one of our chapter offices in Bellevue, Tempe, Austin, Minneapolis, or Miami?  Our limited number of spring clerkship positions offer students the unique opportunity to work closely with our attorneys on a flexible schedule 15-20 hours per week.  We’re accepting applications now and will conduct interviews through mid-December.

To apply, and for more information about all of our student opportunities, click here.

Attention 1Ls! Public Counsel Now Accepting Summer 2015 Clerkship Applications

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For law students who want to spend their summer practicing law in one of the country’s most prestigious public interest law settings – this opportunity is for you!

Public Counsel, the nation’s largest pro bono law firm, is now accepting applications from 2L’s for its 2015 Summer Clerkship Program. Applications from 1L’s will be accepted beginning December 1, 2014. Any questions regarding the summer program should be directed to Public Counsel Summer Program Coordinator, Sandra Madera.

For complete information on the summer program, including how to apply for a clerkship, interested students should visit Public Counsel’s 2015 Summer Clerkship Application page here

Public Knowledge Seeking Summer Law Clerks, Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis

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Public Knowledge is a nonprofit technology policy organization. Public Knowledge promotes freedom of expression, an open internet, and access to affordable communications tools and creative works. We challenge barriers to people’s rights to fairly create, access, own, and use innovative technologies by providing resources to policy makers and the public.

Public Knowledge is currently hiring summer law clerks for 2015. Applicants must be current law students. Applicants should have a demonstrated interest in public interest technology policy, including issues arising under telecommunications, copyright, patent, privacy, and international law.

Public Knowledge is committed to ensuring that all interns are compensated for their work. We will work with exceptional candidates who do not receive funding from their schools to help secure alternate third-party sources of summer funding.

For more information, click here.

Americans United for Separation of Church and State Seeking Constitutional Litigation Intern for Summer 2015, Due 1/15/15

Americans United for Separation of Church and State

Americans United for Separation of Church and State – the nation’s leading church-state advocacy organization – is seeking first-year, second-year, and third-year law students to work as interns in our legal department in Washington, D.C. Full-time positions are available during the summer; both part-time and full-time positions are available during the fall and spring.

Americans United has a diverse litigation and amicus curiae practice addressing a wide variety of church-state issues. We challenge religious activities in the public schools, public financing of religious institutions, and government-sponsored prayers and religious displays. We defend women’s, LGBT, and other civil rights against religion-based discrimination and deprivation. Most of our cases involve novel, cutting-edge First Amendment and other constitutional issues.

The duties of legal interns include assisting with ongoing litigation by conducting legal and factual research and writing; drafting demand letters to resolve constitutional violations without filing suit; and analyzing potential new cases. Legal interns may also draft pleadings, briefs, or discovery.

For more information, click here.

Sierra Club in Portland, Oregon Seeking Chapter Director

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Founded by legendary conservationist John Muir in 1892, the Sierra Club is now the nation’s largest and most influential grassroots environmental organization — with more than two million members and supporters. Our successes range from protecting millions of acres of wilderness to helping pass the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, and Endangered Species Act. More recently, we’ve made history by leading the charge to move away from the dirty fossil fuels that cause climate disruption and toward a clean energy economy.

The Chapter Director, implements policies and programs adopted by the Chapter Executive Committee.  Manages the staff budget and operations of more than one of the following operational areas: conservation and legislative program, fundraising, volunteer development and member services, budgeting and financial management, and media relations.

For more information, click here.

Legal Foundation of Washington Seeking Education Director, Open Until Filled

The Legal Foundation of Washington (LFW) seeks an Education Director to staff the Equal Justice Coalition and support our efforts to maintain and increase public funding for civil legal aid at the federal, state and local levels. The Education Director works closely with the Access to Justice Board, a core workgroup, an advisory council, stakeholder organizations, and more than 3000 friends of equal justice that include lawyers, judges, community leaders, law students and members of the public committed to making equal justice for all a reality in Washington state.

The Education Director educates the public, elected officials and the media about the importance of civil legal aid for low-income people. The Education Director works closely with key partners, stakeholders and our Olympia-based lobbying team to develop and implement communication strategies, education efforts, and media outreach to preserve and increase funding for civil legal aid in Washington. The work is challenging and fast-paced, and requires someone who works well both on a team and independently.

For more information, click here.

Attention 3Ls! American Constitution Society Seeking 2015-2016 Law Fellow

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The American Constitution Society for Law and Policy (ACS) seeks a talented recent law school graduate to fill a position in ACS’s national headquarters. The Fellowship will begin in September 2015 and end in August 2016. The Fellow will serve as part of ACS’s Department of Policy Development and Programming staff, which is led by a group of experienced attorneys who coordinate and facilitate ACS’s rapidly expanding output of innovative, highly relevant legal and public policy work. He or she will work with the Department staff to implement an ambitious multi-year effort to engage scholars, practitioners, public officials, and law students in the articulation and dissemination of a progressive vision of the Constitution, law, and public policy.

The Fellow will have the opportunity to work on a range of progressive issues that are reflective of the ACS Issue Groups, which include Access to Justice; Criminal Justice; Economic, Workplace and Environmental Regulation; First Amendment; Separation of Powers and Federalism; Constitutional Interpretation and Change; Democracy and Voting; Equality and Liberty; and Judicial Nominations.

For more information, click here.

Attention 1Ls and 2Ls! National Lawyers Guild Offering 2015 Haywood Burns Memorial Fellowship for Social and Economic Justice, Due 1/12/15

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The Haywood Burns Fellowships are designed to encourage students to work in the NLG’s tradition of “people’s lawyering.” The program exists to help students apply their talents and skills to find creative ways to use the law to advance justice. Burns Fellowships provoke law students to question traditional notions of how one must practice law and to provide a summer experience that will enrich and challenge them.

Over the years, the Summer Projects program has expanded to place hundreds of students with public interest organizations working to protect and further the civil rights of oppressed people in the United States. Although providing legal work under the direction of their attorney-organizers is important, the primary mission of the summer projects is to strengthen each student’s long-term commitment to promote justice and equality. Fellows have worked with groups to provide legal, political, and educational support on a wide variety of issues, including voting rights; union democracy; workplace health and safety; the death penalty and prison reform; lesbian/gay/bisexual/trans rights; defense of protesters from police harassment and criminal sanctions; and international human rights.

For more information, click here.

Advocate for Housing for the Homeless! Register Now for Advocacy Day!

December 19: Asian Bar Association of Washington (ABAW) Holiday Party and CLE

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Please join the ABAW for its final social event of the year on Friday, December 19th at the House of Hong, 409 – 8th Ave S, Seattle, WA 98104.   First, join us for a free CLE from 4:00 – 5:30 PM presented by our very own Serin Ngai (“Nuts and Bolts of Family Law – How Parenting Plans are Developed”).  Then stay for the festivities from 5:30 PMonward.  As always, we will be hosting a White Elephant style gift exchange ($20 or less please).  Members only!  Please RSVP to christopher.wong@kingcounty.gov by Monday, December 15, 2014 so we can have an accurate headcount.  Also, please let us know if you are intending to attend the CLE, the dinner, or both.

CLE Details: 

  • Date/Time: 4:00 -5:30 on December 19, 2014
  • Topic: Nuts and Bolts of Family Law-How Parenting Plans Are Developed
  • Speaker: Serin Ngai
  • CLE Credits: 1.0 for General and 0.5 for Ethics; pending approval
  • Description:  This CLE provides the general practitioner with basic knowledge of the practice of family law in King County beginning with the procedural nuts and bolts, such as how to file motions and the motions practice. The seminar will then primarily focus on parenting plans – how they are developed, what GALs review and consider when performing investigations and making recommendations to the court, and tips and suggestions on how to fine-tune and finesse a parenting plan that works for various relationships and unique situations. Finally, the seminar will touch upon the ethical obligations that may arise for a family law attorney.
  • Speaker’s Bio:  Serin Ngai is the Managing Member of Sound Family Solutions, PLLC. Ms. Ngai is a certified Title 26 Guardian ad Litem on the King County GAL Registry and is also certified in Collaborative Law. She has also served as an ABAW board member for the past 7 years in various positions, and is currently the Pro Bono Chair and manages the ABAW’s two legal clinics. She also volunteers in the Family Law Clinic with the King County Bar Association SW Legal Clinic in West Seattle. She was recently awarded one of the Top 10 Family Law Attorneys Under Age of 40 in Washington state by the National Academy of Family Law Attorneys.

January 30-31: Arctic Encounter Symposium 2015

Arctic Encounter Symposium

Charting a Path to US Leadership in the Far North

Friday-Saturday, Jan. 30-31, 2015
8:00 AM – 6:30 PM
University of Washington & Museum of History and Industry (MOHAI), Seattle, WA

The second annual Arctic Encounter Symposium will challenge participants to tackle the shared interests and concerns of the United States and the global community as we look north to the last emerging frontier – the Arctic. Leading experts, CEOs, and thought leaders from the science, technology, maritime, and energy sectors, will gather to challenge the status quo dialogue, critically address challenges to realizing the Arctic’s full potential and collaborate on solutions. Participants will include key industry leaders, policy makers, and regional stakeholders.

This year’s symposium will focus on the role of the U.S. as an arctic nation and the challenges it will confront in its upcoming chairmanship of the Arctic Council, including: climate change, natural resources, investment opportunities, and international relations. The goal of the 2015 Arctic Encounter is to facilitate a creative environment for the development of a proactive agenda, short and long-term domestic and international priorities, and a strategic execution plan.

The two-day program includes complimentary continental breakfast, coffee, and keynote luncheons on both Friday and Saturday. Participants will enjoy a networking reception and seated dinner at the Museum of History and Industry (MOHAI) at Lake Union on the evening of Friday, January 30. A closing reception will take place at the conclusion of the program on Saturday, January 31.

Register online here.  For more information, click here.

February 17: Registration for Housing and Homelessness Advocacy Day 2015 Now Open

Housing and Homelessness Advocacy Day

Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2014
8:00 AM – 4:00 PM
United Churches, 110 Eleventh Ave. SE, Olympia, WA

Join hundreds of fellow advocates from across Washington on Tuesday, February 17 for Advocacy Day. This is an important day for the statewide affordable housing and homelessness movement to come together, get energized, and learn more about the latest legislation and policies creating more opportunities for safe, healthy, affordable homes.

Last year, the 600+ voices at Advocacy Day set the stage to help pass homelessness legislation, in the 11th hour, that had been initially killed in a Senate committee.

This year, an immense $4.5 billion budget shortfall means we’re facing several mandates that have the potential to de-fund crucial safety net services and investments in affordable homes. But on the bright side, there are important advances to be made in tenants rights and supportive housing.

We have to make sure these issues are front-and-center in Olympia because everyone needs a home. And coming together during Housing and Homelessness Advocacy Day is a great way to start!

Register online here.  For more information, click here.

Have you Already Secured a Summer Internship doing Social Justice Work? Don’t Miss Out on an Early Application for Funding

On Human Rights Day, UN Official Calls for Member States to ‘Stamp Out Torture’

Jean-Marc Ferre

By: UN News Centre

10 December 2014 – Governments must ramp up their efforts in eradicating the practice of torture and compensate the victims of this “most vicious of crimes,” the top United Nations human rights official has urged, as he marked the 30th anniversary of the adoption of the Convention against Torture.

In a press statement issued today following the release of two “ground-breaking” reports – one from the United States and another from Brazil – on the use of torture by both Governments, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, called on all Member States “to act unequivocally” in stamping out the practice.

“Today is not only Human Rights Day,” Mr. Zeid said, as he recalled the UN-backed observance commemorating the date on which the General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, “it is also the 30th anniversary of the adoption of the Convention against Torture on 10 December 1984.”

“Yet, as yesterday’s US Senate Select Committee on Intelligence report shows, torture is still taking place in quite a few of the 156 countries that have ratified the Convention against Torture and have domestic legislation making it illegal.”

Continue reading here. Photo credit: UN Photo/Jean-Marc Ferré

2015 Haywood Burns Memorial Fellowship for Social and Economic Justice, Applications Due 1/12/15

Haywood Burns

The Haywood Burns Fellowships are designed to encourage students to work in the National Lawyer’s Guild’s tradition of “people’s lawyering.” The program exists to help students apply their talents and skills to find creative ways to use the law to advance justice. Burns Fellowships provoke law students to question traditional notions of how one must practice law and to provide a summer experience that will enrich and challenge them.

Over the years, the Summer Projects program has expanded to place hundreds of students with public interest organizations working to protect and further the civil rights of oppressed people in the United States. Although providing legal work under the direction of their attorney-organizers is important, the primary mission of the summer projects is to strengthen each student’s long-term commitment to promote justice and equality. Fellows have worked with groups to provide legal, political, and educational support on a wide variety of issues, including voting rights; union democracy; workplace health and safety; the death penalty and prison reform; lesbian/gay/bisexual/trans rights; defense of protesters from police harassment and criminal sanctions; and international human rights.

For more information, click here.

Human Rights Essay Award: Call for Submissions, Due 2/1/15

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Are you interested in attending an all-expense paid 3 week summer program on Human Rights and Humanitarian Law taught by over 39 world-renowned practitioners and academics at American University Washington College of Law? Well, now is your chance! Submit an essay to the Human Rights Essay Award Competition and you could be the lucky winner to receive a scholarship to attend the 2015 Program of Advanced Studies in Human Rights and Humanitarian Law. This year’s topic is “Transitional Justice, International Human Rights and Humanitarian Law” and the deadline to submit is February 1, 2015. Participants have the flexibility to choose any subject related to the assigned topic. The best articles may be published in the American University International Law Review.

This annual competition sponsored by the Academy on Human Rights and Humanitarian Law seeks to stimulate the production of scholarly work in international human rights law. The Academy will grant two Awards, one for the best article in English and one for the best article in Spanish. The Award in each case will consist of: a scholarship to the Academy’s Program of Advanced Studies, travel expenses to Washington D.C., housing at the university dorms and a per diem for living expenses.

For detailed guidelines about the award, click here.

Attention US Citizens! David L. Boren Fellowship, Applications Due 1/27/15

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The David L. Boren Fellowship provides a unique funding opportunity for U.S. students to study in world regions critical to U.S. interests (Africa, Asia, Central & Eastern Europe, Eurasia, Latin America, and the Middle East).  Boren Fellows receive up to $24,000 for overseas study or up to $30,000 for a combination of overseas and domestic study.

Deadline: January 27, 2015 at 2:00 PM (PST)

For UW Information Session Webinars: December 9, 2014 and January 6, 2015.  Register online here.

For more information, click here.

 

Interested in Getting Some Experience at a Foreign Firm? Check Out the Brigard & Urrutia Summer Internship

Center for Economic and Social Rights (CESR) Seeking Graduate-Level Research Intern for Spring 2015

Center for Economic and Social Rights

Interns contribute substantively to the Center’s work in one or more of program areas. In particular, interns carry out research that analyzes trends in global policy. They also contribute to the Center’s research documenting deprivations of economic and social rights in specific country contexts; this interdisciplinary research deploys social science and statistical methods alongside traditional techniques of human rights reporting, such as legal analysis and narrative testimony. Interns are also involved in preparing reports and other advocacy materials based on the findings of such research, to present to relevant institutions at the national, regional and United Nations level. As a small NGO, the Center has established robust partnerships with national, regional and international organizations that allow for mutual exchange of expertise. Interns may also interact with our partners, including by attending meetings and workshops, preparing or delivering presentations, authoring blogs posts and opinion pieces, etc.

For more information, click here.

ACLU Seeking 2015 Summer Law Clerk in Washington DC

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The ACLU of the Nation’s Capital is the Washington, D.C. affiliate of the American Civil Liberties Union, a national nonprofit organization devoted to the protection of civil liberties and civil rights. Founded in 1961, the ACLU of the Nation’s Capital is one of the District’s premier public advocacy organizations, focusing exclusively on issues that arise within the District of Columbia in areas such as police practices reform, racial justice, freedom of speech and religion, LGBT rights, gender equality and prisoner rights. We advance civil liberties through litigation, legislation and public education.

The summer law clerks at the ACLU of the Nation’s Capital gain a comprehensive, hands-on introduction to the legal work of one of the nation’s major advocacy organizations. Virtually all work involves civil liberties and constitutional law.

When possible, law clerks attend trial or appellate proceedings involving staff or volunteer attorneys, as well as depositions and legislative hearings. Law clerks are also encouraged to take part in the many programs for summer interns in Washington, D.C.

For more information, click here.

Family Equality Council Seeking Law Fellow

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Family Equality Council connects, supports, and represents the one million parents in America who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender, and the two million children that they are raising. Over the past 30 years we have built an approach that strengthens families in three ways: building our community to support parents and children; sharing our stories to open hearts and minds; and raising our voices to create social justice for all families.

FEC is seeking legal interns for both Spring and Summer 2015 in their Washington, DC office. Interns will work with onsite legal staff to pursue legislative, regulatory, and policy goals as advocates for LGBTQ parents and families. Legal interns will have the opportunity to learn about legislative and regulatory drafting, law and policy affecting LGBTQ families, and the legislative process.

All interns will work in FEC’s Washington, DC office. Spring interns are expected to make a commitment of at least twelve hours a week. Summer interns are expected to make a commitment of 35 hours a week for at least 10 weeks.

Legal interns will have a range of day to day responsibilities including drafting advocacy memoranda, direct advocacy with agencies and congressional offices, contributing to social justice coalition meetings, and other legal research and writing projects.

For more information, click here.

Associate Director, Center for Professional Development at the Seattle University School of Law

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Seattle University has an exciting, dynamic opportunity for an Associate Director, Center for Professional Development to join our community.

Reporting to the Director of the Center for Professional Development, this position will counsel and coach law school students and alumni/ae to identify their career interests and goals. Develop skills and strategies for their job searches and professional development.

Seattle University School of Law educates ethical lawyers who distinguish themselves through their outstanding professional skills and their dedication to law in the service of justice. Faculty, students and staff form a vibrant, diverse, and collaborative community that promotes leadership for a just and humane world. The Law School’s commitment to academic distinction is grounded in its Jesuit Catholic tradition, one that encourages open inquiry, thoughtful reflection and concern for personal growth. Innovation creativity and technological sophistication characterize our rigorous educational program, which prepares lawyers for a wide range of successful and rewarding careers in law, business and public service.

For more information, click here.

Attention Rising 1Ls and 2Ls! Deborah T. Poritz Summer Public Interest Legal Fellowship Offers Paid Internships

LSNJ

The Deborah T. Poritz Summer Public Interest Legal Fellowship program awards paid summer internships to rising 1L and 2L law students at New Jersey public interest legal organizations. This program is available to those who seek a paid fellowship, as well to those who would like to pursue an opportunity for public interest work, but have other funding available to them. Applications will be considered and hiring decisions will be made on a continuing basis until all positions are filled (usually by mid-April). Interested students are strongly encouraged to apply as early as possible. The program particularly seeks people who have demonstrated their commitment to helping the disadvantaged through their prior work, extracurricular activities during school and volunteer efforts, and give evidence of strong commitment to a public interest career. Grades, honors and personal achievements are also important.

For more information, click here.  To apply, click here.

International Bar Association Offering Legal Internship Programs

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Intern positions are available for undergraduate law students, postgraduate law students, and newly qualified lawyers at the International Bar Association’s offices in London and Washington DC.

Established by the IBA in 1995, the International Bar Association’s Human Rights Institute (IBAHRI) works with the global legal community to promote and protect human rights and the independence of the legal profession worldwide.

Our core activities include: human rights training and technical assistance for legal practitioners and institutions; international fact-finding, delivering  timely and reliable information on human rights and the legal profession; and supporting lawyers and judges who are arbitrarily harassed, intimidated or arrested through advocacy and trial monitoring. A focus on pertinent human rights issues, including the abolition of the death penalty, poverty, and sexual orientation forms the basis of targeted capacity building and advocacy projects.

For more information, click here.

Attention Recent Grads! Associate Attorney Position Open at EarthJustice in Seattle

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Earthjustice is seeking applicants for an associate attorney to begin work in the Fall of 2015 or sooner.  The Northwest Office opened in 1987 to enable Earthjustice to take a more active role in preserving the unique natural resources and environment of the Pacific Northwest.

Since that time, the Northwest office has undertaken campaigns to protect old growth forests, promote salmon recovery, improve water quality, protect Puget Sound and the communities that depend on it, stop coal-fired power plants, protect farmworkers and their families from pesticides, and respond to climate change, among other things.

Although the primary focus of the Northwest office is representing environmental and citizens’ groups in Washington, Oregon, and Idaho, we often take cases with national and international scope. For example, the Northwest office is involved in cases seeking to stop coal exports to Asia and transport of crude oil to ports along the entire west coast as part of its effort to reduce reliance on dirty fossil fuels.. We also have led nationwide litigation to protect 58.5 million acres of undeveloped, roadless areas on our National Forests. We frequently work in close partnership with Native American Tribes and fence-line communities.

Our office is located in the heart of downtown Seattle near the federal and state courthouses, the waterfront, and historic Pioneer Square. Our goal is to produce the highest quality legal work in a diverse, inclusive, supportive, and collegial environment. The Northwest Office has nine attorneys, including this position.

For more information, click here.

Brigard & Urrutia Seeking Intern for Summer 2015

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We are pleased to announce the Brigard & Urrutia/Brigard & Castro Summer Internship Program (the “Program”).  Our Program is directed to students who are currently pursuing a legal education in foreign law schools and, as such, have obtained outstanding academic results.

The Program is designed to afford students the opportunity to spend 6 weeks of their summer vacation at Brigard & Urrutia/Briggard & Castro, the leading full service law firm in Colombia.  During the Program, students will have the occasion of experiencing work at a Latin American law firm, may rotate among our different legal practice groups, participate in our training activities and be in contact with life in Bogota, a vibrant city with a rich cultural life.

For more information, click here.

Davis, Cowell & Bowe, LLP Seeking Law Clerk in San Francisco, CA

Davis Cowell and Bowe LLP

Davis, Cowell & Bowe, LLP in San Francisco is seeking summer law clerks for its San Francisco office.  We represent unions and workers in a wide-ranging practice, both in terms of geography and subjects.  We have a heavy emphasis on organizing, including representing UNITE HERE throughout the United States in all of its hotel and gaming organizing campaigns.  We also represent local unions from Boston to Orlando to San Diego to Seattle to Honolulu, and in between, in addition to many in California and Nevada.  Our clients include international and local unions representing hotel workers, grocery workers, firefighters, construction workers, doctors, dentists, and others.  We have expanded far beyond traditional labor and employee benefits law in our work for unions, to include First Amendment, corporations and securities, consumer, environmental, election, immigration, antitrust and other areas of the law.  We have pioneered the use of card-check neutrality agreements to organize and have negotiated, and continue to negotiate, hundreds of these organizing agreements.  We also represent plaintiffs in employment class actions.

For more information, click here.

Global Rights Compliance Seeking Business and Human Rights Intern

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Global Rights Compliance is an international group of lawyers specializing in human rights issues. It is led by Wayne Jordash QC, a British barrister, and Scott Martin, an American lawyer.

Global Rights Compliance is seeking motivated and hard-working interns to join an international team that works on matters relating to business and human rights, international humanitarian law, international criminal law and international trade and development.

The internship is remote, which means that the intern can be home-based.

For more information, click here.

Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) Seeking Legal Volunteer Intern at the Office of General Counsel, Spring 2015

CFR Logo

Founded in 1921, the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) is a leading nonprofit membership organization, research center, and publisher, with headquarters in New York, an office in Washington, DC, and programs nationwide. It is dedicated to increasing America’s understanding of the world and contributing ideas to U.S. foreign policy. CFR’s 4,700+ members are leaders in international affairs and foreign policy.

CFR’s volunteer internship in the Office of the General Counsel provides a volunteer intern the opportunity to receive legal training, as well as skills training in areas such as legal writing, research, and client management. This position does not involve areas of international law, but rather issues facing domestic not-for-profit corporations. The position reports to the CFR General Counsel.

For more information, click here.

Celebrate Human Rights Day by Learning More about Homelessness Online!

December 10: How to Make Human & Civil Rights Real – Homelessness and Beyond Webinar

national law center housing

Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014
2:00 – 3:00 PM EST / 10:00 -11:00 AM PST

On Human Rights Day, Wednesday, December 10, the National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty will host a free webinar discussing the criminalization of homelessness as a violation of civil and human rights, and strategies advocates can use to work toward solutions.

The webinar will discuss three forthcoming reports from the Law Center, including:

The webinar will include updates on recent human rights advocacy to address the criminalization of homelessness, methods that individual advocates can employ in their work, and the important role the federal government has in combating criminalization.

To register for the webinar, click here.

January 13: A Panel Discussion on Compensated Surrogacy

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Tuesday, Jan. 13, 2014
6:00 PM
William H. Gates Hall, RM 138

Please join Washington Law Review on Tuesday, January 13, 2015 at 6:00 pm for a panel discussion on Compensated Surrogacy, the subject of our December 2014 symposium issue.

Compensated surrogacy is an arrangement in which a woman carries and gives birth to a child in exchange for money. Such an arrangement affects many parties—the child born, the surrogate, the parents who wish to raise the child, the donors of genetic material, and others. But in the United States, surrogacy remains a largely unregulated area. The December 2014 issue of Washington Law Review is dedicated to scholarship addressing compensated surrogacy and the legal and political implications for groups affected.

THE PANEL INCLUDES:

Peter Nicolas is the Jeffrey & Susan Brotman Endowed Professor of Law at the University of
Washington School of Law. His article, “Straddling the Columbia” discusses his own experiences  as an intended parent of a surrogacy arrangement, before ultimately concluding that surrogacy arrangements merit constitutional protection.

Terry Price is the Associate Director of the Center for Law in Science and Global Health at the
University of Washington School of Law. His article, “The Future of Compensated Surrogacy
in Washington State: Anytime Soon?” discusses the legislative history of attempts to regulate
compensated surrogacy in Washington State.

Sara Ainsworth is the Director of Legal Advocacy at the National Advocates for Pregnant Women. Her article, “Bearing Children, Bearing Risks” approaches the topic of compensated surrogacy from a feminist perspective, with the goal of drawing more feminist voices into this ongoing discussion.

This panel will be moderated by Kellye Testy, Dean of the University of Washington School of Law.

Click here to RSVP.

January 20: Attorney General 8th Annual Open House

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Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2014
3:30 – 5:30 PM
800 5th Ave., Suite 2000, Seattle, WA (Bank of America, Fifth Avenue Plaza Bldg.)

The Attorney General’s Office (AGO) serves more than 230 state agencies, boards, commissions, colleges and universities, as well as the Legislature and the Governor. The mission of the Office is to deliver the highest quality professional legal services to officials, agencies and citizens of the state of Washington. The Office is comprised of over 500 attorneys and 600 professional staff.

Assistant Attorneys General from many of the AGO’s divisions will be in attendance to speak about opportunities that exist within their divisions and the AGO. Information about the Office’s volunteer law clerk recruitment program for first and second year law students will also be available.

Are you a Strategic Thinker Looking for a Service Opportunity? Washington’s Access to Justice Board Could Use Your Help!

Opportunity for Service: Washington State Access to Justice Board

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The Access to Justice Board is seeking a strategic thinker with a demonstrated commitment to equitable justice to fill a seat on the Access to Justice Board.  Established by the Washington Supreme Court in 1994, the Board seeks to achieve equal access to the civil justice system for those facing economic and other significant barriers.  The three-year term begins in May 2015 and the position may be filled by an attorney or other community member.  The Board is especially interested in individuals who can help continue to build collaborative relationships with community-based organizations and the Alliance for Equal Justice.

To apply and/or learn more about the work of the Access to Justice Board, please visit www.wsba.org/ATJApplications are due January 9, 2015 at 5PM PST.

Request for Workshop Proposals: Access to Justice Conference

ATJ Workshop

Wenatchee Conference Center, June 12-14

The Access to Justice Board’s Conference Planning Committee is now accepting proposals for 2015 Access to Justice Conference workshops.  This year’s conference will focus on solutions to address structural impediments to equitable justice and meet the needs of our growing client community.  We encourage and invite you to submit a 90 minute workshop proposal for consideration by the committee.  Proposals should be consistent with the criteria outlined in the attached document.  All workshops will take place on Saturday, June 13, 2015 at the Wenatchee Convention Center.

Proposals must be received by 5 p.m., Friday, January 23, 2015. Submit proposals using the attached form to Terra Nevitt, terran@wsba.org. Electronic submissions only please. The conference planning committee will select the workshops and plenary sessions. You will be notified as soon as the final decisions have been made whether or not your proposal was selected. If your proposal is selected you will receive more detailed information about the conference planning process, procedures, policies and deadlines.  If you have questions, please call Terra at (206) 727-8282.

Washington State Association for Justice Offering Bar Preparation Scholarship for Diversity and Women, Apply Now for Exam Dates in July 2015/February 2016

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The Mission of the Washington State Association for Justice (WSAJ) is to stand up in the courtroom and the halls of government for real people. We defend your Constitutional rights, including the right to have your day in court. We hold corporate and other powerful interests accountable. We are a community creating and sharing resources for our members to secure justice.

WSAJ is committed to implementing strategies that will result in significant and measurable progress towards increasing diversity in the plaintiff’s bar. To help achieve this endeavor, WSAJ has pledged scholarship monies to assist diverse individuals in covering the tuition cost of a bar preparation course. Diversity refers to individuals who self-identify with those groups historically discriminated against and or those groups that are historically under-represented in the legal profession based on disability, gender, race, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression. Scholarship recipients will be selected based on several criteria, including (but not limited to) demonstrated interest and intent to practice in the plaintiff’s bar, financial need, academic achievements, extracurricular and community activities, and life experiences. No single criteria is determinative.

Applications are due by Monday, January 12, 2015. 

For more information on the diversity scholarship, click here.
For more information on the scholarship for women, click here.

Lawyers Fostering Independence Offering Free CLE This Friday

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Lawyers Fostering Independence (LFI) provides free civil legal services to young people who have been in foster, group, or kinship care at some point while growing up. With the help of volunteer attorneys, our mission is to improve outcomes for former foster youth by providing them with access to legal services – services that can mitigate the specific adversities experienced by these youth who have been raised in our care.

Our all-day training is on December 5th from 9:00am-3:30pm at Garvey Schubert Barer.

The morning will consist of an introduction to LFI, hearing from former foster youth about their experiences and needs, and our Trauma-Informed Legal Representation CLE (1.5 ethics credits pending). The afternoon will include two training sessions: one on credit and debt issues and the other on sealing juvenile records and vacating adult records. 1.25 CLE credits pending for each of these sessions.

A light breakfast and lunch will be provided.

Contact Serena Holthe to register.  Click here for more information.

The Innocence Project NW  Freedom Fridays

IPNW

Friday, December 5, 2014
12:00 – 4:00 PM 
Dorsey Whitney, 701 5th Avenue, Suite 6100, Seattle, WA

Speakers:

  • Jacqueline McMurtrie is an Associate Professor at the University of Washington School of Law and the founder and Director of the Innocence Project Northwest (IPNW). The only resource of its kind in Washington State, IPNW’s mission is to exonerate the innocent, remedy causes of wrongful conviction and offer law students an outstanding education. Since 1997, IPNW has obtained exonerations of thirteen men and women who collectively served over 90 years in prison for crimes they did not commit.
  • Fernanda Torres is a Staff Attorney and Volunteer Coordinator at the Innocence Project Northwest (IPNW). She helps oversee the screening and review of applications for assistance and leads the litigation of non-DNA cases. She recruits and supervises IPNW volunteers. Prior to joining IPNW, Ms. Torres practiced criminal defense as a public defender and in private practice.

For more information, click here.

Pro Bono Opportunity with the King County Bar Association’s Housing Justice Project and Family Law Program

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The Housing Justice Project is a walk-in legal clinic providing counsel and advice, negotiations with landlords or opposing counsel, and limited representation for low income residential tenants facing eviction in King county. HJP clinics operate at the King County Courthouse in Seattle and the Maleng Regional Justice Center in Kent.

Apply to volunteer as an intern by January 25, 2015. For more information about the Housing Justice Project, click here.

Pro Bono Services family law programs promote family safety and equal access to the legal system by assisting domestic violence survivors, children at risk of abuse or neglect and clients facing barriers to accessing the courts due to language, disability or other factors. Programs include the Family Law Mentor Program, Kinship Care Solutions Project and Self Help Plus Program.

Position is open until filled.  For more information about the Family Law Program, click here.

Pro Bono Opportunity Working with Domestic Violence Survivors

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Your role as a Family Law Legal Support volunteer will be to assist staff attorneys in their representation of the client.

Note that this position is based out of the Domestic Abuse Women’s Network (DAWN) offices in Tukwila, WA to support the ELAP DV Staff Attorney placed on-site at DAWN.

This is a volunteer opportunity provided by VolunteerMatch, in partnership with LinkedIn for Good.

For more information, click here.

Equity and Social Justice Work is Hard. Seriously Hard Work. No, Really it is.

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By: Cultures Connecting Blog

Significant change, whether individual or within an organization can be challenging. Even when we want to change, it doesn’t happen easily. I recently heard implicit bias compared to a habit, albeit a bad one. Think about how hard it is to change a habit…

A couple of months ago, my brother in law was coming over to my house to pick up his dog after work. We’d talked earlier and he reminded me to leave the front door open for him. Then he sent me a text about 15 minutes before I was leaving as a second reminder. “Leave the door unlocked, leave the door unlocked,” I chanted in my head as I gathered my things to go. Then I went through my mental list of what I needed to bring with me, made sure I had it all, walked out, locked the door and left. His poor dog was locked inside.

Even though I wanted to change that habit and was focusing a lot of mental energy on doing something different, the moment I got distracted, I forgot and went back to what I do every day.

Now imagine there are a bunch of individuals trying to change an organization. But they’ve all learned and practiced habits of stereotypes, biases, and institutional oppression for years. Some have even gotten rewarded for this behavior by being told they’re a “good fit” at the company and getting promoted. Some are the founders of the organization or have worked there so long they see any mention of needed change as a personal affront. Others have been going along to get along, trying not to make waves by bringing up experiences of marginalization. They may even be telling themselves they imagined it or making excuses for oppressive behavior such as, “I know he didn’t mean it that way.”

Continue reading here.