Want some money and a trip to D.C.? Need tips for upcoming job fairs? Want to be a racial justice advocate? Check these out!

Going to the Public Service Career Fair on February 6? Not Sure How You Can Prepare?  Check Out These Table Talk Tips & Career Fair Interviewing Tips!

NW PS Career Fair logoAttention all students! Planning on attending the NW Public Service Career Fair? Whether you have an official interview or not, don’t miss your chance to do table talk (informational interviews) the morning of the fair. Remember, organizations and agencies participate in table talk because it is an effective prescreening tool to recruit interns. There have been many instances where students were successful in securing internships through table talk so don’t miss  out! Center for Public Service Law staff will be at the fair for support and advice

See employers registered for Seattle

When: Friday, February 6, 2015

10-10:30—Student & Employer Check-in

10:30-12 noon—Table Talk

12:40-5:00pm – Pre-scheduled Interviews

Where:  LeRoux in the Student Center at Seattle University

Whether you’ve got an official interview lined up or not NW Public Interest Career Fair, here are some helpful tips to guide you on being a savvy table talker or interviewee.

Read more about table talk tips here.
Read more about career fair interviewing tips here.

Forget to register for the NW Public Interest Career Fair?  You can still register here. View a sample list of participating employers this year here.

Don’t miss this opportunity! Make sure to register for new online Racial Justice Training Institute trainings 

With recent events in Ferguson, Staten Island, and elsewhere, our nation is at a pivotal moment in understanding and addressing issues of race, implicit bias, and the structural barriers that marginalize communities of color. It is more important than ever for equal justice advocates to refocus their efforts to affirmatively advance racial equity.

Following the success of the inaugural 2014 Racial Justice Training Institute, the Sargent Shriver National Center on Poverty Law is pleased to announce the 2015 Racial Justice Training Institute. By placing the most up-to-date racial justice tools in the hands of front line advocates, the Institute provides real opportunities to address the impacts of structural racialization and ensure that race is front and center in our efforts to eradicate poverty in the communities we serve.

The Institute will cover a wide range of equity best practices ranging from traditional litigation and policy advocacy, to media and messaging, to the latest debiasing strategies. Working in teams, and with support from skilled faculty and facilitators, participants will use new racial justice knowledge and skills in their daily work and in the race-equity initiatives that teams will pursue throughout the Institute.

Taking place over six months (June—November 2015), the Institute includes three parts:

PART 1: Online (June 1—June 19, 2015)

PART 2: Onsite in Chicago (June 23-26, 2015)

PART 3: Online (July – November 2015)

Up to 35 advocates will be selected for the second Institute cohort based on a variety of factors, including experience, interest, goals, capacity, and racial and geographic diversity.

Learn more about the Racial Justice Training Institute

Application Deadline: February 27, 2015

Get your your materials ready for the 2015 Law Student Legal Writing Competition!

Eligibility:
Open to all students currently enrolled in an ABA Accredited Law School.

Topic:
Papers should address any legal issue regarding affordable housing and/or community development law.

Submission Requirements:

Entries must be original, unpublished work. Articles should be between 25-50 double-spaced pages and should include footnotes in Bluebook format. There is no entry form of any kind. Articles should be submitted in Word format. All author-identifying information should be removed from the article. A separate title page should be attached and must contain the article’s title, the student’s name, and the student’s contact information including street address, phone number(s), and email address.

Award:
Submissions will be blindly evaluated by a committee of Forum members. A single winning paper, as judged by the selection committee, will be awarded a prize of $1,000 and a trip to attend the Forum’s Annual Conference, May 20-22, 2015, in Washington, D.C., airfare and lodging included*. The winner is responsible for any taxes on fair market value of full award, including travel, registration and lodging. Winner will be required to submit a completed 1099 as a condition of receiving award.  The decision of the judges is final.

The winning essay may be published in the Journal of Affordable Housing and Community Development Law. If selected for publication, winner will be required to sign a standard publication agreement giving the ABA the right of first publication.

Date: All entries must be postmarked or emailed by March 6, 2015.

Send entries to the Journal’s Editor-in-Chief: 

James J. Kelly, Jr., Clinical Prof. of Law, Notre Dame Law School; J.Kelly@nd.edu. Please contact Dawn R. Holiday at dawn.holiday@americanbar.org, if you have any questions.

Fellowships, Clerkships, Internships, Oh My! Explore new opportunities from Anchorage to NY

Legal Counsel for the Elderly – Summer 2015 Law Clerks

AARP Legal Counsel for the Elderly (LCE) champions the rights of seniors by providing free legal services to low-income DC residents age 60 and older. LCE provides assistance with civil legal matters, including landlord/tenant matters, consumer issues including property tax cases, and public benefits.

The D.C. Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program at LCE advocates for residents of nursing home, assisted living facilities, community residence facilities and residents in their private homes. Ombudsmen work to resolve complaints of residents and to bring about resolution, including changes at the local, state and national levels to improve residents’ quality of care and quality of life.

Summer law clerks are sought to work on the following projects:

Legislative Reform

Schedule H Case Handling

Ombudsman Legal Assistance

Nursing Homes and Alternatives Manual

To apply, submit a resume and cover letter indicating your area(s) of interest to Rochelle Bobroff, Senior Attorney for Systemic Reform, Legal Counsel for the Elderly, rbobroff@aarp.org

Rolling Deadline!: NARAL PRO-CHOICE NEW YORK – Summer Legal Intern

NARAL Pro-Choice New York is the leading pro-choice political and advocacy organization in New York State. The National Institute for Reproductive Health, the sister organization of NARAL Pro-Choice New York focuses on research, education, and policy work in states and localities to promote reproductive rights and expand access to reproductive health care, reduce unintended pregnancies, and empower youth to make healthy sexual and reproductive decisions. The National Institute’s focus is on building support for a proactive agenda for, and unapologetic approach to, reproductive rights, health, and justice. We do this by helping to strengthen a decentralized yet interconnected movement, based on authentic partnerships founded on mutual respect and learning, capacity building, and information sharing in strategic cities and states across the country. To that end, the National Institute offers strategic guidance, hands?on support, and funding to help state and local leaders and organizations build a public base of support, engage policymakers, change public policy, and remove barriers to health care.

The law clerk/legal intern should expect to engage in policy analysis of key pieces of state legislation across the country; perform legal research and draft legal memoranda to advance our policy priorities; and gain experience working in state and national coalitions working to advance reproductive rights.

Please email a resume, cover letter, and legal writing sample to internships@prochoiceny.org with subject line “Legal Intern.” People of color, people with disabilities, women, and LGBT candidates are strongly encouraged to apply. Applications will be considered on a rolling basis.

Feb. 02, 2015: ROBERT F. KENNEDY CENTER FOR JUSTICE & HUMAN RIGHTS – Donald M. Wilson Fellowship

The Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice & Human Rights (RFK Center) was founded as a living memorial to Robert F. Kennedy in 1968. Ever since, the RFK Center has honored journalists, authors, and human rights activists who, often at great personal risk and sacrifice, are on the frontlines of the international movement for human rights and social justice. Partnering with these courageous and innovative human rights defenders, RFK Partners for Human Rights is the litigation, advocacy, and capacity-building arm of the RFK Center. Combining a rights-based approach and extended multi-year partnerships with the RFK Award Laureates and other human rights activists, RFK Partners for Human Rights leverages its legal expertise, resources, and prestige to advance social justice goals around the world.

In 2011, the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights established the Donald M. Wilson Fellowship program to provide a position at the RFK Center to one outstanding recent law school graduate each year. Donald M. Wilson and his family recognized the need for greater support for recent graduates who wish to devote their professional lives to public service and generously endowed the Fellowship program at the RFK Center. The Fellowship provides invaluable training and experience for a recent law school graduate preparing for a career in human rights.

The Fellowship carries the name of the prominent magazine journalist who developed a close friendship with Robert Kennedy during John F. Kennedy’s presidential campaign. A LIFE magazine correspondent for twelve years, Donald M. Wilson covered the Korean and Vietnam wars for the magazine and afterward led LIFE’s Washington, D.C., bureau, where he met Robert Kennedy. Following the campaign, Donald M. Wilson was appointed deputy director of the United States Information Agency (USIA) and served under presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson. In 1989, he retired as Corporate Vice President-Public Affairs at Time Inc. In 1991, with James L. Greenfield, a former assistant managing editor at The New York Times, he founded the Independent Journalism Foundation, a non-profit organization committed to promoting free and independent media in Eastern and Central Europe and Southeast Asia.

Qualifications

The ideal candidate will have experience with regional and international human rights law and norms; working knowledge of the United Nations treaty body system and/or the regional human rights mechanisms (e.g. Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights, etc.); working knowledge of domestic legislative and human rights systems; an ability to maintain active contacts with international civil society as well as key stakeholders in the aforementioned systems; an ability to master complex human rights issues under tight deadlines; and excellent written and verbal communication skills.

A Juris Doctor (J.D.) degree (or foreign equivalent) is required. We particularly encourage recent law school graduates (2013-2014) and those graduating in Spring 2015 to apply.

Fluency in Spanish, French, and/or Arabic is helpful but not required.

Application Instructions:

Please e-mail a cover letter, resume, brief writing sample (preferably related to international human rights law), and a list of 3 references to:

Hiring Manager
Subject line: Donald M. Wilson Fellow
jobs@rfkcenter.org 

Feb. 13, 2015: Criminal Division (CRM) OFFICE OF ENFORCEMENT OPERATIONS – LAW STUDENT VOLUNTEER, SUMMER (Washington, D.C.)

OEO is a non-litigating section of the Criminal Division. OEO provides investigative and prosecutorial support, legal advice, and review and approval required by statute or policy in almost 40 distinct subject areas. OEO oversees the use of the most sophisticated investigative tools at the federal government’s disposal, including electronic surveillance, the Federal Witness Security Program, subpoenas to members of the news media in federal cases, subpoenas to attorneys, applications to search the premises of attorneys, and requests to immunize witnesses. OEO provides legal advice to federal prosecutors and agencies on the above-mentioned programs and investigative techniques, and assists in developing Department policy on emerging technologies and telecommunications issues. OEO also responds to requests made to the Criminal Division for disclosure of information under the Freedom of Information Act and Privacy Act, and serves in a coordinating role for the Criminal Division with regard to victim and witness assistance. In addition, OEO supervises the International Prisoner Transfer Program.

Legal interns will be responsible for research/writing projects on diverse, complex legal issues in highly-sensitive matters, working under the supervision of OEO attorneys.

Qualification:

All applicants must be United States citizens and currently enrolled in law school. Applicants must have a strong academic background, excellent writing skills, experience or a demonstrated interest in criminal law and/or a commitment to public service, and mature judgment. Because interns may be reviewing sensitive documents and confidential information from law enforcement and intelligence agencies, it will be necessary for interns to obtain a security clearance. The security background check requires a fingerprint submission and takes two or three months. Any offer is contingent on clearing the background investigation.

Feb. 13, 2015: U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS – Summer 2015 Law Intern

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Alaska District, Office of Counsel, located in Anchorage, Alaska, is looking for a law intern for Summer 2015. The Alaska District is a full service district that maintains a wide spectrum of programs including military construction, civil works construction, and environmental cleanup and regulation.

Surrounded by the picturesque Chugach and Alaska Ranges, Anchorage is Alaska’s largest city with more than 250,000 people. Our office is located on Joint Base Elmendorf Richardson, which is adjacent to Anchorage. Anchorage is well known for its long, cool summer days during which hiking, bicycling, kayaking, and fishing are within an easy driving distance after work and on the weekends.

The Alaska District Office of Counsel is a busy office with five attorneys and three paralegals. The law intern selected for this position will primarily assist our attorneys in a diverse array of practice areas such as litigation and government contracts, real estate, fiscal law, employment law, and environmental law and regulations.

Qualifications

The selected law clerk will be scheduled to work ten 40-hour weeks, between May and August 2015 with the exact start and end dates to be negotiated.

If you are interested, please apply by submitting a cover letter, resume, and a copy of your law school transcript for completed semesters or quarters through December 2014 to Carl Olson at carl.f.olson@usace.army.mil.

If you have any questions concerning the duties of this position, please contact Carl Olson or Brendan Davis at 907-753-2532.

For more information about the Alaska District, see our website at http://www.poa.usace.army.mil/About/Offices/Legal.aspx

Feb. 20, 2015: VERA INSTITUTE OF JUSTICE – Summer 2015 Internship, Legal Orientation Program Law Student Intern 

The Vera Institute of Justice runs an annual summer internship program for undergraduate, graduate, and law school students. Interns typically work full time in one of Vera’s departments or centers and programs; some part-time positions may be available. In addition to working on individual assignments, all interns participate in events organized by the internship coordinator. For example, in previous summers interns visited Sing Sing Correctional Facility; observed hearings at the New York City Immigration Court; lunched with executive-level management; and visited Vera demonstration projects.

Vera’s Center on Immigration and Justice collaborates with government, nonprofits, and communities to develop evidence-based justice solutions for systems affecting immigrants and their families. The Center also addresses the challenges presented by the increasing convergence of the criminal justice and immigration systems. The Center on Immigration and Justice seeks a law student intern to work on the Legal Orientation Program (LOP).

The LOP was created to inform detained immigrants about their rights, and the immigration court and detention processes. On behalf of the federal government’s Executive Office for Immigration Review, Vera staff work with nonprofit legal service agencies to provide detained people at 30 sites nationwide with basic information about forms of relief from removal, how to represent themselves in immigration court, and how to get legal representation.

Responsibilities: The intern duties may include: conducting background legal and/or policy research; interviewing experts and others; drafting best practice memos and short reports; assisting in developing trainings and presentations; analyzing data collected to inform programs and help develop program plans; and researching potential funders and writing grant proposals. Students interested in the internship should note that while all of the work will be law-related, much of it will be supporting policy and technical assistance.  Vera does not provide direct legal services to immigrants.

Qualifications

The ideal candidate will have strong communication skills, excellent initiative, genuine flexibility, as well as a demonstrated interest in immigration, law/public policy, and/or criminal justice. Fluency in Spanish or another second language is a plus.

Salary

Prospective interns are encouraged to seek independent funding either through their law schools, colleges, universities or public interest foundations, or through fellowship grants or internship programs.

Application Instructions:

Please submit a resume, dates of availability and cover letter.

Electronic submissions in PDF format are preferred; however if necessary, materials may be mailed or faxed to:

Summer Internships: CIJ LOP Internship

Vera Institute of Justice
233 Broadway,12th Floor
New York, NY 10279
Fax: 212-941-9407

Feb. 27, 2015: International Summer Internship Programme – International Law Institute (Uganda) 

ILI-ACLE IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR ITS 2015 INTERNATIONAL SUMMER INTERNSHIP PROGRAMME SCHEDULED FOR JUNE 1 – July 31, 2015. THE CLOSING DATE FOR APPLICATIONS IS FEBRUARY 27, 2015 OR WHEN ALL INTERNSHIP SEATS HAVE BEEN FILLED. EARLY APPLICATION ARE HIGHLY ENCOURAGED.

Each year ILI-ACLE draws a talented pool of students and young professionals in its competitive Internship Programme. Over the years we have drawn interns from Harvard Law School, Georgetown Law Center, NYU Law School, Vanderbilt Law School, Temple Law School, Case Western Reserve School of Law and Pacific McGeorge School of Law, among others.

Responsibilities

Internships at the Institute are rewarding experiences for law students with drive and interest in legal and judicial reform and project implementation – with a focus on the African continent. Interns take part in any number of activities that are being implemented at their time of internship. These include assisting with the preparation of seminars (including curriculum development) and gaining insight into project implementation and management by assisting with ongoing technical assistance projects. Interns assist in conducting research, drafting reports, attending meetings and engaging in related administration. They also have an unparalleled opportunity to meet legal and other professional specialists at the forefront of public and private development in sub-Saharan Africa and across the globe.

Qualifications

Must be a law student.

Application Instructions:

To apply for an internship with ILI-ACLE, please email Ms. Keita Rose-Atkinson, Senior Associate Attorney/Public Sector Liaison at krose@ili.or.ug, copying administrator@ili.or.ug with a detailed letter of interest, current CV, academic/professional letter of recommendation and a writing sample. Shortlisted candidates will be interviewed via telephone, videoconferencing or in-person (for Ugandan applicants). Please note that only shortlisted applicants will be contacted.

Mar. 2, 2015: Attention recent grads! 2015 SANFORD HEISLER PUBLIC INTEREST DIVERSITY FELLOWSHIP – Foundation for Advocacy, Inclusion & Resources (FAIR)

The Foundation for Advocacy Inclusion and Resources (FAIR) is accepting applications for its second annual Sanford Heisler Public Interest Diversity Fellowship, which will enable a new attorney to work full-time for two consecutive six-month terms at the (1) Legal Aid Society-Employment Law Center and a (2) law practice affiliated with the California Employment Lawyers Association (CELA), an organization of more than 1100 workers’ rights advocates around California. Sanford Heisler, LLP, a leading national public interest firm, has donated the funds to FAIR to provide a Fellow with salary and benefits during the first six months the fellow is working at Legal Aid Society-Employment Law Center. The applicant will then be matched with a CELA affiliated firm for the second six month term and be paid a salary and benefits by that entity.

Applicants must have superior academic qualifications, be members of the California Bar (or anticipating becoming members by fall 2015), be committed to a career in social justice, and have 0-3 years of legal experience. Preference will be given to applicants with diverse backgrounds, demonstrated interest in employment law, clinical and/or pro bono and social justice interests, and plans to practice in California. Foreign language abilities and judicial clerkships/externships are also valued.

It’s winter time, so warm up with some with these upcoming community events!

Jan. 24, 2015: Body-worn cameras: Will they increase police accountability? 

The Seattle Police Commission will be hosting a panel discussion about the initiation of Seattle Police Department’s body cameras to answer the community’s questions about the new initiative, in light of recent events. Panelists will include: Jay Hollingsworth (John T. Williams Organizing Committee), Marissa Johnson & Dan Bash (Outside Agitators 206), Andrew Myerberg (Assistant City Attorney of Seattle), Jennifer Shaw (ACLU), Detective Ron Smith (Seattle Police Officers’ Guild), and Mike Wagers (Seattle Police Department). The event will be moderated by Fe Lopez. The meeting will be held on Saturday, January 24 from 9:30am to 12:00pm at 7054 32nd Ave South. If you have any questions feel free to contact Tracy Whitlatch at (206) 233-2664 or tracym.whitlatch@seattle.gov.

Jan. 28: Job Search Strategies for People with Disabilities from 12:30-1:20 pm (Room 127)

What kinds of questions can employers ask regarding an applicant’s disability? Should you mention that you have a disability in a cover letter or interview? If so, how do you discuss it? Join the Disability Law Alliance, Diversity Committee, Center for Professionalism and Leadership Development, and Center for Public Service Law for a panel discussion on navigating some legal, professionalism and etiquette issues for people with disabilities seeking employment!

Jan. 27: Homeless youth in Seattle

Presented by: Street Youth Legal Advocates of Washington

SJTThe panel will discuss the challenges of working with homeless youth in the Seattle area. Their experiences include running programs for homeless youth, the mental health aspects of homelessness, and legislative advocacy. They will speak about the legal and non-legal issues facing homeless youth in Seattle, the organizations they work with, and how we as students can help.

Panelists:

  • Ellen Sims, Divine Roots Wellness
  • Hickory Gateless, Center for Children and Youth Justice
  • Katara Jordan, Columbia Legal Services

Jan. 29: Debt and Democracy – How the collection of civil fees and fines contributed to the unrest in Ferguson

This webinar will discuss the levying and collection of unfair fees and fines by municipalities and their courts. According to The New York Times, unjust municipal fee and fine practices were one of the “simmering” issues underlying tensions in Ferguson, Missouri following the killing of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown by a Ferguson police officer. According to The Times, “Young black men in Ferguson and surrounding cities routinely find themselves passed from jail to jail as they are picked up on warrants for unpaid fines.” The webinar will present an overview of the causes, consequences and pervasiveness of the problem, and impact on the community, both in Missouri and around the nation. The webinar will also discuss steps to address the problem, including policy advocacy, legislation and litigation. Register for the webinar here.

Jan 30-31: Arctic Encounter Symposium 

The second annual Arctic Encounter Symposium will challenge participants to tackle the shared interests and concerns of the United States and the global community as we look north to the last emerging frontier – the Arctic. Leading experts, CEOs, and thought leaders from the science, technology, maritime, and energy sectors, will gather to challenge the status quo dialogue, critically address challenges to realizing the Arctic’s full potential and collaborate on solutions. Participants will include key industry leaders, policy makers, and regional stakeholders.

This year’s symposium will focus on the role of the U.S. as an arctic nation and the challenges it will confront in its upcoming chairmanship of the Arctic Council, including: climate change, natural resources, investment opportunities, and international relations. The goal of the 2015 Arctic Encounter is to facilitate a creative environment for the development of a proactive agenda, short and long-term domestic and international priorities, and a strategic execution plan.

The two-day program includes complimentary continental breakfast, coffee, and keynote luncheons on both Friday and Saturday. Participants will enjoy a networking reception and seated dinner at the Museum of History and Industry (MOHAI) at Lake Union on the evening of Friday, January 30. A closing reception will take place at the conclusion of the program on Saturday, January 31.

CLE credit is available to attending attorneys. Please direct questions to mgavin2@uw.edu

The AES Committee is pleased to announce the following committed speakers at this time:

  • Senator Lisa Murkowski, United States Senate – Alaska State Legislature
  • Vice Admiral Charles W. Ray, Pacific Area Commander, U.S. Coast Guard Defense Force West
  • Fran Ulmer, Chair, U.S. Arctic Research Commission
  • Rear Admiral Daniel B. Abel, Commander, 17th Coast Guard District
  • Edward Itta, U.S. Arctic Research Commission, former Mayor of the North Slope Borough of Alaska, former President of the Barrow Whaling Captains Association and the Inuit Circumpolar Council – Alaska
  • Brigadier General Guy Hamel, Royal Canadian Air Force, Deputy Director, Strategy, Policy and Plans, North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) and United States Northern Command (USNORTHCOM)
  • Representative Bob Herron, Co-Chair, Alaska Arctic Policy Commission, Alaska
  • Mikå Mered, Managing Partner, POLARISK Group – London
  • Marilyn Heiman, Director, U.S. Arctic Program, The Pew Charitable Trusts
  • Brendan Kelly, Chief Scientist, Monterey Bay Aquarium, former Assistant Director for Polar Sciences, The White House
  • Rick Fox, President & General Manager, Edison Chouest Offshore
  • Senator Lesil McGuire, Co-Chair, Alaska Arctic Policy Commission, Alaska State Legislature
  • Dr. Lawson Brigham, Distinguished Professor of Geography & Arctic Policy, University of Alaska Fairbanks; and Fellow, U.S. Coast Guard Academy Center for Arctic Studies & Policy
  • Mead Treadwell, Owner, Treadwell Development; Lieutenant Governor of Alaska, 2010-2014; Advisor and Former Chair, U.S. Arctic Research Commission
  • Adrianna Muir, Ph.D., Deputy Senior Arctic Official, U.S. Department of State
  • Alice Rogoff, Publisher, Alaska Dispatch News; Co-Founder, The Arctic Circle
  • Dr. James Kendall, Regional Director, Alaska OCS Region, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management
  • Michael K. Young, President, The University of Washington
  • Kellye Testy, Dean, UW School of Law
  • Craig H. Allen Sr., Judson Falknor Professor of Law; Director, UW Arctic Law & Policy Institute
  • Reggie Joule, Mayor, The Northwest Arctic Borough
  • Rachel Kallander, Founder & Executive Director, Arctic Encounter Symposium; Manager, Kallander & Associates LLC
  • John Iani, Partner, Perkins Coie LLP
  • Chris Gregorich, Chief of Staff, The Office of Mayor Murray, City of Seattle
  • Steve Wackowski, Operations Manager, Tulugaq, LLC
  • Captain John Reeves, USCG Cutter HEALY

Feb. 4: Panel on the Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act

The Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act (PTFA), which offered important protections to tenants in  residential property subject to foreclosure, expired at the end of 2014. Housing advocates are invited to join us for a free webinar to discuss strategies to protect tenants post-PTFA. Five panelists, including Jeremy Bergstrom of the Shriver Center, Kent Qian of the National Housing Law Project, Tristia Bauman of the National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty, Matt Hill of the Public Justice Center, and Linda Couch of the National Low Income Housing Coalition, will discuss the implications of the PTFA’s expiration and state initiatives to pass similar protections.Feb. 4: Panel about the Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act

Upcoming scholarships and new racial justice resources

Due Feb. 1, 2015: Charles Z. Smith Scholarship

The Charles Z. Smith Scholarship honors WA state Supreme Court Justice Charles Z. Smith for his commitment to promoting diversity for all people of color in the legal profession. Establishment of this scholarship recognizes that people of color, particularly African-Americans, are underrepresented in the legal profession and recognizes the pivotal role that effective legal advocacy plays in protecting the rights of minorities both individually and collectively. The recipient(s) will receive $500 to be applied towards their next quarter’s tuition and fees.

To apply, applicants: (1) must be a student of color admitted to the UW School of Law;
(2) must submit 2 letters of recommendation reflecting the applicant’s demonstrated involvement with and commitment to servicing one or more of the ethnic specific communities. The letters of recommendation must disclose the applicant’s relationship to the recommending party and include an appraisal of the applicant’s commitment to the goal of the scholarship;
(3) must have financial need (determined through OSFA) and
(4) must submit a personal statement describing the applicant’s demonstrated commitment and ties to the minority community. This personal statement should not exceed 2 type-written double-spaced pages. All application materials must be sent via e-mail to: lawadm@uw.edu by February 1, 2015 at 5PM PST.

Due Feb. 1, 2015: McKinley Irvin Family Law Scholarship

The McKinley Irvin Family Law Scholarship will be awarded each year to a UW law student with an interest in the field of family law. McKinley Irvin is the largest law firm in the Pacific Northwest focusing exclusively on divorce and family law. McKinley Irvin has protected the rights and responsibilities of families since 1991—handling all family attorney practice areas, as well as complex cases including high asset divorce, child custody and international family law matters.

To apply, applicants must submit: (1) a cover letter explaining the applicant’s interest in the practice of family law and (2) their resume to William H. Gates Hall Room 231 (Office of Admissions & Financial Aid) or via email to: lawadm@uw.edu by February 1, 2015 at 5PM PST.

Due Feb. 1, 2015: Ralph W. Johnson American Indian Law Scholarship

The Law School’s Native American Law Center was founded to carry on and expand the work of Professor Ralph W. Johnson. For forty-four years, Professor Johnson taught thousands of students at the UW Law School and provided direct assistance to the tribes in Washington State and across the nation. Professor Johnson’s scholarly work in the field of Indian Law is nationally known, his writings have been cited more than 300 times by the United States Supreme Court as well as by lower federal and state court judges. He was the first professor in the United States to teach a class in federal Indian law. It was in honor for Professor Johnson that his wife, Anne Johnson, established this scholarship for students with a demonstrated interest in studying and practicing American Indian law.

To apply, applicants must submit the following: (1) Documentation of your tribal affiliation and/or descent; (2) A personal statement (no more than 700 words) describing your commitment and ties to the Native American community; and (3) One letter of recommendation describing and appraising your involvement in the Native American community and dedication to principles that further the interests of the community. The letter must be in a sealed envelope and can be delivered to the Office of Admissions & Financial, Room 231 by February 1, 2015 at 5PM PST.

Want to Access More Skills and Tools to Achieve Racial Equity? Check out this Extraordinary Resource!

Whether you are student, staff, faculty or UW law grad, you have an opportunity to learn about and take action to achieve racial equity and justice. RacialEquity Tools is designed to support individuals and groups working to achieve racial equity. This site offers tools, research, tips, curricula and ideas for people who want to increase their own understanding and to help those working toward justice at every level – in systems, organizations, communities and the culture at large. Check it out!

On this MLK day look through new social justice and public interest positions!

HIRING: For spring and summer 2015 – Disability Rights CA is seeking law clerk (rolling deadline)

Disability Rights California (DRC) is a nonprofit public interest law firm which is federally mandated to protect the legal, civil and service rights of persons with disabilities. Established in 1978, DRC served persons with developmental disabilities, such as intellectual disabilities, autism and other severe disabilities. In 1986, DRC expanded its services topersons with psychiatric disabilities. DRC now serves all Californians with disabilities—physical, psychiatric,and developmental.

Law clerks will carry a diverse workload that will help develop traditional legal skills as well as skills beneficial to working with clientele in a legal services environment. Law clerks will also gainsubstantive knowledge regarding the systems and laws that affect the lives of individuals with disabilities.

Law clerks at DRC will have the opportunity to:

  • Interview clients and consumers
  • Provide information on self-advocacy
  • Conduct legal research and produce legal writing
  • Represent clients in mediations and at administrative hearing
  • Provide assistance to people with disabilities who areincarcerated to ensure the enforcement of their legal rights
  • Assist clients in filing disability-based complaints with appropriate state and federal agencies
  • Investigate serious and systemic abuse and neglect instate and private facilities serving people with disabilities
  • Conduct trainings on disability law.

Although some DRC positions are available, preference is given to work-study and volunteer students. Attorneys at DRC are willing to assist students develop grant proposals and fellowship applications.

 

Jan. 21, 2015: U.S. Dept. of Justice – Federal Bureau of Prisons

This attorney will have the opportunity to work with Central Office, regional and institution management and line staff with respect to litigation affecting the Bureau of Prisons, as well as attorneys in the Solicitors General’s Office and other attorneys in the Department of Justice (DOJ) and in the U. S. Attorney’s Offices. The incumbent’s responsibilities include: analyzing adverse decisions against the BOP and drafting recommendations to DOJ for the Assistant Director/General Counsel’s signature, this includes cases before the Supreme Court; analyzing adverse decisions against other correctional agencies and developing a position for the Bureau on amicus participation by the United States in the Supreme Court; developing an expertise in the Prisoner Litigation Reform Act, Religious Freedom Restoration Act, and constitutional issues affecting Bureau litigation; providing training to Bureau and DOJ attorneys on issues affecting Bureau litigation; and participating in moot courts with assistant U.S. attorneys and DOJ attorneys.

The primary duties of the incumbent will be to respond to legal issues involving conditions of confinement arising out of specialized housing units, to include but not limited to, administrative remedy responses, requests for information under the Freedom of Information Act, replies to official correspondence, and manages litigation, to include discovery issues, affecting the Bureau of Prisons.

QUALIFICATIONS:

  • Applicant must possess a J.D. degree, be an active member of the bar (any jurisdiction), and have at least 1 year of post-J.D. experience
  • Preferred qualifications: Some litigation experience is desired.

 

Jan. 22, 2015: Assistant Attorneys General- Criminal Justice Division (Oregon)

The Oregon Department of Justice is seeking applications for an Assistant Attorney General to serve as a critical member of the Attorney General’s Criminal Justice Division. This position is based in Salem and will require periodic travel throughout the state.

The Criminal Justice Division is looking for an experienced prosecutor who is enthusiastic about working with federal, state and local law enforcement across the state to actively investigate and prosecute organized criminal enterprises, public corruption, internet crimes against children, and human trafficking.
Applicants will be expected to evaluate and pursue cases that will result in arrest and conviction. Applicants will also be expected to provide advice and support for District Attorneys and Deputy District Attorneys across the state, and to present at trainings. Additionally, applicants will be expected to prosecute conflict cases and specialty cases at the request of District Attorneys.
 
Experience prosecuting significant cases in a District Attorney’s office (or equivalent experience) is required. Experience prosecuting RICO cases and directing large-scale grand jury and criminal investigations is preferred, but not required.
This position will be filled at either the Assistant Attorney General or the Senior Assistant Attorney General level depending on experience and other factors. Questions regarding this position should be directed to Darin Tweedt, Chief Counsel of the Criminal Justice Division, at (503) 378-6347, (800) 735-1232 TTY.
QUALIFICATIONS:
  • All final candidates for employment must pass a thorough criminal background investigation.
  • Applicants must possess a certificate of admission to the Bar of the State of Oregon and be eligible to practice law before the courts of the State of Oregon at the time of appointment.
  • Experience prosecuting significant cases in a District Attorney’s office (or equivalent experience) is required. Experience prosecuting RICO cases and directing large-scale grand jury and criminal investigations is preferred, but not required.
  • Candidates from diverse backgrounds are encouraged to apply.  The Department of Justice is an equal opportunity employer, does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, religion, age or disability, and is committed to workplace diversity. The Department of Justice is an Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action Employer.

Jan. 29, 2015: Northwest Immigrant Rights Project seeks a new staff attorney

The Northwest Immigrant Rights Project (NWIRP) seeks a Spanish-speaking bilingual attorney to
provide direct representation, community outreach and education to survivors of domestic
violence and sexual assault and others who qualify for humanitarian protections. The staff attorney will provide legal assistance to community members through: (1) direct
representation (2) individual consultations; and (3) community education. The attorney will
focus on providing representation on cases involving U visa petitions, VAWA self-petitions,
adjustment of status applications and other forms of immigration relief. The attorney will also
provide representation in removal proceedings before the immigration court. The staff attorney
may also be assigned work relating to other immigration matters.

QUALIFICATIONS:

  • Law degree;
  • Admission to the bar of any state in the U.S., but will consider an applicant who has taken the bar exam and is awaiting results
  • Demonstrated commitment to immigrant rights and willingness to support NWIRP’s mission, vision and values;
  • Excellent written and oral communication skills;
  • Commitment to working in a diverse working environment;
  • Fluent in English and Spanish;
  • Prior experience working with survivors of domestic violence or sexual assault preferred;
  • Strong organizational skills and ability to work independently; and
  • Proficiency in use of web-based software, MS Word and MS Excel.

Feb. 1, 2015: New York Lawyers for Public Interest seeking staff attorney

New York Lawyers for the Public Interest (NYLPI), a nonprofit civil rights law firm committed to advancing equality and civil rights is seeking applicants for the position of Staff Attorney in
its Health Justice (HJ) Program to provide immigration representation and lead legal and policy
campaigns to increase health access for marginalized communities

QUALIFICATIONS

  • Must be an attorney in good standing.
  • Must either be licensed to practice law in the State of New York or be eligible for admission to the New York bar at the time of hiring (must be admitted within one year of hire).
  • A minimum of two years of experience with legal, policy and/or administrative advocacy.
  • A minimum of one year of experience representing clients in affirmative immigration applications and petitions such as asylum, I-130 and I-485 petitions, U- and TNonimmigrant status, and deferred action. Exceptional candidates with less experience will be considered.
  • Excellent strategic judgment and the drive to originate and effectuate challenging campaigns.
  • Experience working with coalitions of community members and community-based organizations.
  • Excellent writing, analytic and public speaking skills.

Feb. 6, 2015: Columbia Legal Services summer internship opportunities for law students!

Columbia Legal Services (CLS) is a statewide legal aid program in Washington State representing low-income people and vulnerable groups with critical civil legal needs. We represent clients in a wide variety of civil cases including class actions and legislative rule-making advocacy from five statewide offices: Seattle, Olympia, Wenatchee, Yakima and Kennewick. We offer several summer internship opportunities for law students. Summer Interns are expected to commit to full-time work for a minimum of 10 weeks. Most positions are for school credit, are paid under work-study, or are fellowship/public interest grant funded. The following positions are offered for 2015:

  • Basic Human Needs (Seattle) [Preference given to Seattle U and Gonzaga students]
  • Children & Youth Project (Seattle)
  • Institutions Project (Seattle)
  • Laurel Rubin Farmworker Justice Project (Olympia, Wenatchee, Yakima) [PAID position]
  • Working Families Project Foreclosure Work Group (Olympia) [Policy intern]
  • Working Families Project Foreclosure Work Group (Seattle)
  • Working Families Project Immigrant Workers Group (Seattle)

Feb. 13, 2015: 2015 Michael Maggio Immigrants’ Rights Summer Fellowship – CENTER FOR HUMAN RIGHTS AND CONSTITUTIONAL LAW

The primary mission of the Michael Maggio Immigrants’ Rights Fellowship is to strengthen law students’ long-term commitment to promote justice and equality for vulnerable immigrant groups.

The Fellowship will be awarded to one law student each summer to work on a student-initiated project. Students must submit a project proposal with an organization willing to host the student for 10 weeks and provide a $1,500 stipend (the Maggio Immigrants’ Rights Fellowship will provide a $2,500 stipend). The Fellow will be required to provide reports half way through and at the conclusion of the Fellowship, regarding his or her progress in meeting the goals of the project. The host organization must be willing to supervise and provide all logistical needs of the Fellow including office space and supplies. Host organization will also be asked to provide a brief report at the end of the Fellowship.

QUALIFICATIONS:

  • Law student (1L, 2L, or 3L) in good standing at any accredited law school program in the United States.
  • Demonstrated commitment to social justice and/or immigrants’ rights issues.

Mar. 1, 2015: Northwest Immigrants Rights Project – Intern for 1Ls, 2Ls, and 3Ls!

NWIRP’s Seattle Office services low-income immigrants and refugees in Western Washington. The office provides direct legal representation, referrals to pro bono attorneys, pro se assistance, and workshops on immigration matters ranging from asylum, citizenship, family petitions, and protections for immigrant children and victims of crimes.

Under the supervision of attorneys, interns will assist with case matters before the Immigration Court and the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). Depending on unit placement, interns’ responsibilities may include: Conducting legal research and drafting briefs in support of applications for relief; researching country conditions in support of claims for asylum; preparing and submitting filings with the Immigration Court and USCIS; and working directing with clients, such as conducting intakes and drafting client declarations in support of
applications for relief.

QUALIFICATIONS

  • The internship is open to first, second, and third year law students. Applicants should have excellent written and oral communication skills, an interest in immigration law, an ability to work in a diverse and fast-paced work environment, and a commitment to advancing and defending the legal rights of low-income immigrants and refugees.
  • Applicants proficient in Spanish are strongly preferred.
  • The internship is unpaid, but NWIRP will work with applicants to secure outside funding or academic credit.

 

National Center for Youth Law (NCYL) seeking juvenile justice attorney in their Oakland office (rolling deadline)

The National Center for Youth Law (NCYL) (www.youthlaw.org) is a non-profit organization that for more than four decades has used the law to ensure that low-income children have the resources, support, and opportunities they need for a fair start in life. NCYL’s primary areas of focus are child welfare, juvenile justice, and health/mental health.

NCYL seeks an attorney to lead projects aimed at improving the educational outcomes of probation-involved youth. The work will focus on serving youth who have been adjudicated delinquent and remain under the jurisdiction of the probation agency, but are not in a locked facility. The attorney will be supervised by NCYL attorneys with expertise in juvenile justice and foster youth education.

The attorney’s primary responsibilities will include, but are not limited to:

  • Adapting FosterEd’s model, strategies, program materials, and technology tools to meet the needs of probation-involved youth;
  • Partnering with state and local agency partners to implement programs serving probation-involved youth;
  • Developing measurable project objectives and detailed workplans; and
  • Ensuring implementation of program goals and outcomes.

This job will not involve providing direct legal representation to juveniles.

QUALIFICATIONS

  • Law degree
  • Ability to work with probation, child welfare, education, and judicial agencies, and with at-risk youth and their families; to manage complex projects; to pay close attention to details and manage multiple assignments; and to work in a fast-paced nonprofit environment
  • Excellent writing, speaking, and interpersonal skills
  • Demonstrated commitment to improving the lives of at-risk youth

Desired Qualifications:

  • An understanding of the education, child welfare, probation, and juvenile court systems
  • Significant experience working with the juvenile probation system and/or the juvenile court system
  • Experience forming and participating in cross-system collaborative teams; working directly with at-risk children and youth; and working with data

 

January 16 is the Last Day to Get Your Discounted PILA Auction Tickets!

January 20: Social Justice Tuesday- Working for Workers: A Career in Labor and Employment Law

SJTlogo12:30 – 1:20 p.m. – Room 127

Hosted by: Students for Labor and Employment Justice

The panel will offer insight into the various areas of Employment Law practice. Representing private plaintiff practice, federal agency, state agency and union practice, our diverse panel will discuss the many ways for attorneys to advocate on behalf of workers.

Panelists:

  • Marc Cote – Partner at Terrell Marshall Daudt & Willie, PLLC
  • Abigail Daquiz – Trial Attorney at the U.S. Department of Labor
  • Katy Dixon – Assist. Attorney General at the Washington Attorney General’s Office
  • Dmitri Iglitzen – Partner at Schwerin Campbell Barnard Iglitzin & Lavitt, LLP

January 21: Law and Leadership: The New Generation of Women General Counsel

Women LeadTime:    5:00 – 7:00 pm (reception 5-5:30pm; panel  presentation to follow)

Where: Law Offices of Stoel Rives, 600 University St., Suite 3600, Seattle 98101

Co-sponsored by UW Women’s Law Caucus and CPLD

Panel members:

Melanie Curtice (Moderator), partner at Stoel Rives LLP, Seattle office.

Deirdre Runnette, General Counsel to Zulily

Denali Kemppel, General Counsel to Arctic Slope Regional Corp., Anchorage, Alaska

Lorena González, General Counsel to Seattle Mayor Ed Murray

Open to all students! Please RSVP in Symplicity.

January 21: UW Law Grad Sahar Fathi Speaking at Leadership Firesides: Storytelling and conversation with inspiring leaders

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Sahar Fathi
Policy Changer & Immigrant/Refugee Rights Activist

Sahar Fathi is an international lawyer turned policy analyst who is a powerhouse of social change on a mission to shakeup how city policy is made.  Fathi currently serves as a policy analyst for the Seattle Office of Immigrant and Refugee Affairs and was formerly a legislative aide to Councilmember Mike O’Brien on the Seattle City Council and a legal clerk for the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda.

HUB Fireplace Lounge, 1st floor
Register

The Husky Leadership Initiative and Starbucks present:

The popular Leadership Fireside series is an ongoing opportunity for students to engage in meaningful dialogue with a diverse range of civic, educational, corporate and campus leaders in an informal setting. These leaders will share their personal journeys and perspectives on leadership and become momentary mentors for students attending the event. The diversity of guest speakers means that each Fireside will be unique. Students who want to reflect and engage in a dialogue about leadership and further develop the skills and knowledge to be effective leaders on and off campus will want to be sure to attend. 

The winter 2015 Leadership Firesides feature diverse perspectives from an immigrant/refugee rights activist, sexual violence warrior, lieutenant general, poet, geologist, computer scientist and theologian. The setting is intimate and informal and space is limited for each program. Registration is strongly encouraged so you don’t miss out! Register for winter quarter Firesides here. You may enter the registration system as many times as necessary.

January 22: What You Need to Know About Loan Forgiveness- Free Education Debt Relief Webinar led by Equal Justice Works

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3:00 pm4:10 pm EST

A must attend for anyone with student debt, this free webinar explains how to reduce your monthly student loan payments and qualify for Public Service Loan Forgiveness.

Register now here.

For further information on borrowing, repaying and earning forgiveness on student loans, download our free e-book, “Take Control of Your Future.”

 

February 20: Get Your Discounted PILA Auction Tickets Here! Deadline is Jan 16 for Discounted Tickets!

PILA 20th Auction Benefit

To celebrate 20 years of funding public interest, we’re

ROLLING OUT THE RED CARPET

Join us for a night of Old Hollywood Glamour!

Formal attire encouraged.

Friday, February 20, 2015 at 5:30pm.

In the Husky Union Building (HUB)

Reduced PILA auction ticket pricing has been extended to this Friday!

$105 per person ($130 after )

Discount extended through 1/16!

$70 for reduced admission* ($80 after Jan. 16) $790 per table of 8 ($940 after Jan. 16) $540 for reduced price table of 8* ($640 after Jan. 16)

*Available to students, nonprofit employees, government employees, and those otherwise unable to afford a regularly priced ticket. Students may buy 1 additional ticket.

RSVP by FEBRUARY 11TH, 2015 online at pila.ejoinme.org/tickets QUESTIONS? PILA@UW.EDU

 

New Summer Funding, Writing Competition, Attend Citizen University & Board Service News- Just for You!

UW Law & Latina/o Bar Association Announce New Public Interest Summer Grant, Deadline 4/3

UW LBAW Summer Grant

The Latina/o Bar Association of Washington and the University of Washington School of Law Public Interest Summer Grant provides $5000 for one UW Law Latina/o student to intern with a public interest organization and/or any UW law student with a summer internship working with an organization providing access to justice/equal justice to Latina/o communities. This summer grant is a jointly funded initiative by the Latina/o Bar Association of Washington and (LBAW) and the University of Washington School of Law (UW Law).

The purpose of this grant is to support Latina/o UW Law students in pursuit of public interest careers and other UW law students committed to increasing access to justice to Latina/o communities.

Students must first secure an offer of an unpaid summer internship with a public interest employer before applying. For complete information and application instructions please click here.

Funding for UW Law Students is Available for: Citizen University National Conference, Funding Deadline: 1/22!

Citizen University (3.21 conference) Image_Guiding Lights Network

Let’s rekindle citizenship in America! March 20 & 21, 2015

Friday, March 20 at 6:30pm at Fisher Pavilion – Seattle Center

This annual national conference is like no other civic gathering in America. Hundreds of change-makers, activists, and catalysts show up to learn about power, build their networks, and recharge their sense of purpose. They come from across the country, the political spectrum, and a wide range of domains — from immigrant rights to national service, voting reform to veteran re-integration, civic education to Hollywood and tech. They are you.

This is a time when citizens are solving problems in new ways, bypassing broken institutions, stale ideologies, and polarized politics. We are part of a movement to rekindle citizenship in America. We hope you’ll join us

Bring a water bottle, wear comfortable clothing and shoes, and learn how to practice powerful citizenship! http://www.citizenuniversity.us/conference/

If you wish to attend send your request and resume to mestorms@uw.edu by January 22, 11:59 pm.

William L. Dwyer Jury Project Award Writing Competition, Deadline 4/20

William Dwywer

UW Law and the Federal Bar Association of the Western District of Washington are again sponsoring the William L. Dwyer Jury Project Award writing competition. Only UW Law Students (2L/3L/LLM) can enter. 

Judge Dwyer was a respected and beloved Seattle federal district judge who was passionate about protecting the role of juries in our legal system. He cared about this subject so much that wrote an incredible book during his last years of life, called “In the Hands of the People: The Trial Jury’s Origins, Triumphs, Troubles, and Future in American Democracy.” After his death in 2002, his former clerks and the attorneys who appeared before him created this writing competition to honor his legacy. 

To enter, write a paper on the American jury system (including the grand jury system! Papers about Ferguson, New York, and other recent events are welcome). Polish and submit a paper you are already writing for a class, or write a paper specifically for the competition. The paper can be a traditional law-review style scholarly article, an essay or magazine-style article, an empirical analysis (e.g., of jury composition or awards in one or more jurisdictions or types of cases), etc. You can view past winning papers here: http://www.law.washington.edu/Writing/competitions.aspx 

First prize this year is $2,500. A second prize of $500 may also be awarded. The winning paper may also be published in the Federal Bar News. 

Washington State Bar Foundation Seeks Law Student Trustee for Board of Trustees

WSBF

The Washington State Bar Association Board of Governors is currently seeking a law student to fill the position of Student Trustee on the Washington State Bar Foundation Board of Trustees.  The Bar Foundation is the fundraising arm of the WSBA.  Its mission is to provide financial support for WSBA programs that promote diversity within the legal profession and that enhance the public’s access to, and understanding of, the justice system. Bar Foundation funding helps to power vital programs like the WSBA Moderate Means Program, WSBA Call to Duty, and more. 

Candidates must have completed at least one academic year at one of Washington’s law schools.  The ideal candidate will be passionate about diversity and public service within the legal profession, and will have experience with nonprofit leadership and fundraising. 

This Student Trustee’s term will begin upon appointment, will last for the duration of the student’s time in law school, and may be renewed upon graduation. Trustees are stewards of the Bar Foundation, a nonprofit public charity, and are actively involved in all aspects of donor development.  The Student Trustee helps connect students from all three Washington law schools with the Bar Foundation and the WSBA programs it supports. 

To learn more about duties and time commitments, please contact Megan McNally, Director of Advancement, at meganm@wsba.org, or (206) 727-8272. To be considered, please submit a cover letter and résumé by email to foundation@wsba.org.

Newsflash! Millennials are More Likely to Volunteer!

December 29, 2014, The Associated Press

Photo courtesy: Flickr/Alex Pearson
Employees from Yahoo! at a volunteer day in 2011.

WASHINGTON — Tired of hearing people grouse about a tuned-out, apathetic younger generation?

Well, here’s a comeback: Today’s young Americans are more serious about giving back than their parents were.

In fact, those under age 30 now are more likely to say citizens have a “very important obligation” to volunteer, an Associated Press-GfK poll finds.

The embrace of volunteering is striking because young people’s commitment to other civic duties — such as voting, serving on a jury and staying informed — has dropped sharply from their parents’ generation and is lower than that of Americans overall.

Among six civic activities in the AP-GfK poll, volunteering is the only one that adults under 30 rated as highly as older people did.

“I want to make my city where I live a better place,” Morgan Gress, 24, of Washington said after sorting and hanging donated clothes with co-workers who chose to volunteer in lieu of an office holiday party. After you volunteer, she said, “You never walk away feeling you didn’t have a great time, or help someone out, or learn something new.”

Today’s young adults grew up amid nudges from a volunteering infrastructure that has grown exponentially since their parents’ day, when the message typically came through churches or scouting. Continue reading here.